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Big Foot wins Perennial powerhouse dominates in opener Page 1C

LG’s Dam

Back to school

Learn about the history of the dam in Flat Iron Park Resorter

Throughout the paper read about changes and proposed changes at area schools. Inside

Chamber honors Larry Magee Former alderman, Lake Lawn and LGRN win awards Page 7A

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Thursday, August 29, 2013

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After veto, council approves pay raise By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net Mayor Jim Connors’ veto of pay raises for the Lake Geneva mayor and city council members will stand. But the council was quick to approve another pay package, designed to ease the mayor’s concerns. The Lake Geneva City Council voted 5-3 on Monday to overturn the mayor’s veto. Six votes were needed to overturn. Voting to uphold the mayor’s veto were aldermen Jeff Wall, Dennis Lyon and Gary Hougen. Voting to overturn were council members Sarah Hill, Sturg Taggart, Ellyn Kehoe, Alan Kupsik and Bill Mott. But the mayor’s successful veto didn’t end debate about a raise for the council members and the mayor. And a new set of raises were approved by the council on a 7-1 vote, with only Wall opposed. What the mayor will do is still pending. At its Aug. 12 meeting, the council members voted 5-

2 with one alderman absent, to mayor’s compensation will be increase the annual salaries for $6,858. council members from $3,500 By law, the raise approved to $4,000 and the mayor from by the council will not begin $6,000 to $7,500. until the next round of municiOn Aug. 14, Connors issued pal elections. his first-ever veto message. Lake Geneva has four Connors did not come out aldermanic districts with two against raises for the council council members each. Council and mayor. members serve staggered twoHis message was that the year terms. Connors Wall Hill raises were disproportionate The mayor’s seat is also up and unfairly weighted toward the mayor. for election in 2014. The council members would have received a 14.3 perThose elected in the 2014 election would be the first cent raise, while the mayor received a 25 percent boost. to get the raises, followed by council members elected in As the council members again discussed the proper 2015. level of city council and mayoral compensation, Kupsik The issue of council and mayoral compensation came successfully proposed that the raises be 14.3 percent across up because neither of the elected positions has seen a pay the board. raise since 2008. Council members’ pay will go to $4,000 a year, and the PLEASE SEE RAISE PAGE 7A

City’s oldest cemetery reopens

The Fair is finally here

By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

ON MONDAY crews were setting up the Walworth County Fairgrounds in preparation for the five day event. The Walworth County Fair begins on Wednesday and runs through Labor Day. For more fair coverage sees this week’s Resorter.

When it was first platted in 1837, Pioneer Cemetery was on the very outskirts of the village of Geneva. Located north of Dodge Street between Maxwell and Warren streets, the venerable burial ground is now in the middle of a quiet residential neighborhood. After years of being locked off, starting in June this year, the cemetery was reopened to the public. In the past, visitors had to call in advance to get into the burial ground. Patrick Quinn, a former Northwestern University history professor and archivist, was handed the key to the cemetery gate by the Lake Geneva Cemetery Commission. Quinn’s job is to be the volunteer sexton, docent and key keeper for the cemetery. He keeps the gates openn from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and keep an eye on things within the cemetery’s fence. Not that there’s much to watch, Quinn said. Visitors are few and the residents don’t move around, he said. PLEASE SEE PIONEER PAGE 8A

Misinformation launches cartoonist’s career LG’s Martin world’s most prolific comic strip artist By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net A longtime Lake Geneva area resident, Joe Martin said his cartoon career began with misinformation. “My friend told me his uncle was the comics editor at the Chicago Sun-Times,” Martin said. “I told him I was going to do a comic strip and send it to (his) uncle. It took me six months to put together a full six weeks of jokes. I brought it to my friend. He said, well, I didn’t realize it but my uncle isn’t the editor. He’s a dispatcher for the trucks.” Martin said he decided to send the work to the newspaper anyway. “I just said, oh, well, it’s done, and I mailed it,” he said. “The odds of anyone reading it was ten thousand to one, but they had a brand new editor there, and he accepted my comic.”

It took another year before Martin’s first comic was published. “Really, I wouldn’t be a cartoonist if that guy hadn’t told me his uncle was the editor,” he said. “I’d still be running my employment agency.” Now, Martin draws seven comic strips for newspapers across the country, and according to the Guinness Book of

OBITUARIES – 3D Nicholas E. Petros, 80, Lake Geneva Henry Rosenthal, 95, Walworth See page 3D

To subscribe call (262) 248-4444

World Records, he is the world’s most prolific comic strip artist. He creates more than 1,300 comics each year. His comic strips include Mister Boffo, Cats with Hands, Willy ‘n Ethel and Porterfield. PLEASE SEE MARTIN PAGE 8A

COMING ATTRACTIONS Civil Air Patrol fundraiser Aug. 29 Champs, 747 Main St., Lake Geneva, will host a pig roast from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 29. The event is a fundraiser for the Southeast Group/Walco Composite Squadron Civil Air Patrol, Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. More upcoming events on 4D

Free shuttle to downtown LG On Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 31 and Sept. 1, a free shuttle will run. Parking/pickup is at the Petco parking lot at Edwards Blvd. and Highway 50 East. Downtown drop-off/pickup is Mill Creek Hotel, Center Street. The shuttle runs continuously every 20 minutes from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

INDEX Editorial .....................1D Police/Court ...............6B TV listings ...............3-4C Community .............3-4D Letters ........................2D Classifieds ..................9B


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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Law enforcement censoring reports Fearing a privacy lawsuit, police are redacting information from the public record By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net In the past, information blocked from police reports involved juvenile offenders and witnesses to crimes. In some cases, victim’s names were also censored from the public record. Now, in some local departments, police are censoring information that once was easily accessible. In some cases, even the names of people who have been arrested have been blocked from the public view. This change wasn’t made because police want to protect the identity of the people they arrest, but instead it is to shield the departments from being sued. The fear of litigation stems from a court case that occurred in Palatine, Ill., when Jason Senne sued the village for leaving a parking ticket on his vehicle that included his name, address, driver’s license number and other personal information. Senne claimed including this information on his ticket violated the 1994 federal Driver’s Privacy Protection Act, which prohibits states from releasing a driver’s personal information. The DPPA was passed when a stalker murdered an actress in 1989 after finding her address through Department of Motor Vehicle records. The Palatine lawsuit occurred three years ago, and a district court tossed the case. The case was reviewed by a 7th Circuit Court panel, and it agreed with the district court. However, the full 7th Circuit Court heard the case and reversed the decision last year. The village of Palatine has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review it. This decision has caused police departments throughout Walworth County to revisit how they release information on police reports. Last November, the League of Municipalities released an article by Claire Silverman, legal counsel, regarding the litigation and potential liability for departments.

“Law enforcement agencies should evaluThe effort it takes to redact informaate all the ways in which they use information can be time consuming, and, legally, tion obtained from DMV records in order the police can’t charge people who request to avoid violating the Drivers Privacy Pro- open records for the time it takes to redact tection Act (DPPA),” Silverman wrote. the information. The DPPA allows law enforcement to The departments can only charge for disclose information in the course of carthe time it takes to locate, print and copy rying out its functions. the documents. The Wisconsin Newspaper Association Lake Geneva Police Chief Michael Rasargues that responding to open records mussen said police are still including the requests is a law enforcement function. names of people who are arrested, but are Silverman disagrees. redacting addresses and dates of birth. “But is the information being disclosed The Lake Geneva police reports that for use by the law enforcement agency in appear in the Regional News include the carrying out its functions? That’s the dif- defendant’s name, age and hometown, ficult question. Based on Senne, I suspect which is information the department prothe answer is no. Moreover, the Seventh vides directly to the paper. Circuit’s statements and obvious concern Rasmussen told a Regional News regarding the ‘very real safety and secureporter that Administrative Assistant rity concerns’ raised by the disclosure of Donna Wisniewski called the process of personal informaredacting information, like someone’s tion “a nightmare.” “This is a matter of statewide home address, sug“Before the 7th concern, it’s not just a matter gests that some or District’s decision, of Walworth County or local all of the personal open records took information needs municipalities,” Walworth County her 20 minutes a to be redacted.” day,” he said. “Now Corporation Counsel Michael In response to it take hours during Cotter said. the Palatine case and the week, she said. Silverman’s article, Recently (Wismany police departments have changed niewski) had a request that took her more how they release information. than five hours to resolve.” This change has meant that numerCity Attorney Dan Draper made the ous Wisconsin papers, including the decision to start redacting information. Lake Geneva Regional News, are left with “We’re not trying to be overly crazy ambiguous police reports. The Regional about it,” Draper said. “On the other hand, News continues to report information as most municipalities are being very cauit receives it, but in some cases the offendtious about what the court of appeals’ ers names, addresses and ages have been decision really means.” redacted from the reports. Central records supervisor for WalPolice departments throughout the worth County, Vicki Runnells, said if county have different policies regarding people are directly involved in a traffic what information is released, and, in some accident, information isn’t redacted from cases, departments have been inconsistent the report. in what information is being redacted. “Right now, if someone is not directly involved in the accident, so if you are not Local response a driver or a victim or something like that, Several of the police chiefs contacted and you make a request for the report, by the Regional News are not in favor of then we redact everything except for the redacting information. name,” Runnells said.

Runnells, Corporation Counsel Michael Cotter, the under sheriff and a sheriff’s captain met and made the decision on what information should be redacted. “The Wisconsin Attorney General’s Office should weigh in on this as well, they are waiting as well,” Cotter said. “This is a matter of state-wide concern, it’s not just a matter of Walworth County or local municipalities.” In 2008, Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen released an informal opinion that states responding to open records requests doesn’t violate the DPPA. However, that opinion was written prior to the Palatine lawsuit. The Wisconsin Newspaper’s Association has filed a lawsuit against the city of New Richmond on behalf of the New Richmond News. That case is pending. Van Hollen won’t opine on the issue until that litigation is resolved. Walworth Police Chief Chris Severt called the decision “a little bit overboard.” “I understand the rationale behind it. It does put a burden on departments when we’re trying to streamline work,” Severt said. “It takes a lot of time to do the proper redact and only giving out the legally allowed information.” The appeals court that ruled on the Senne case has jurisdiction in Wisconsin, Illinois and Indiana. However, so far, only Wisconsin attorneys have determined that police should redact information from police reports. There have been no reports from Indiana or Illinois of information being redacted because of the DPPA. The Regional News attempted to contact the village of Palatine to determine whether it is redacting any information because of the new law. A message left with the village of Palatine’s freedom of information officer was not returned. Chris Schultz and Jade Bolack contributed to this article.

• CORRECTION • Wrong explanation of Genoa City estimate There was an error in the boxed entry titled, “Some estimates already exist,” a breakout box within last week’s article about a special September meeting scheduled in Genoa City. Village President Bill Antti said the first option in that box only includes a plan for dealing with the Americans With Disabilities Act. “It does not correct any of the violations,” he stated in an Aug. 22 email. “The environmental repairs would include an air quality test, removal of the asbestos tiles in the basement and removal of the lead paint on the basement east wall.”


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

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LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Trostel expanding business

Former library employee still owes city money More than $13,000 has been paid By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net

JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS

TROSTEL is making way for additional research and development space, so they took down a portion of their old building on Maxwell Street recently. The new construction is expected to be completed by January, said Terry Wangsness, a senior official at Trostel Ltd. Wangsness said the company will likely be hiring more workers when construction is completed. The company, which has roots dating back to 1852, makes seals.

LAKE GENEVA AREA TIDBITS ‘Swift Night Out!’ set for Aug. 29 Lake Geneva’s second annual “Swift Night Out!” is Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. Held at the Geneva Lake Museum, this natural wonder occurs while watchers gather. Presented by the City of Lake Geneva Avian Committee and Geneva Lake Museum. Swift Night Out is a continent-wide effort to raise awareness about and encourage interest in Chimney Swifts. Chimney Swifts are small, acrobatic birds that migrate from the Amazon Basin of Peru, Brazil and Chile, and come to nest here beginning in mid-April. Easily observed, they are a common sight in many urban areas of Wisconsin. As summer draws to a close and the swifts have finished raising their young, these fascinating aerial acrobats begin to congregate in communal roosts prior to their migration in the fall. Some roosts may consist of an extended family group of a half a dozen birds or so, but the larger sites can host hundreds or even thousands of swifts. Chimney Swift populations in Wisconsin have declined by more than 2 percent annually for the last 28 years, making them one of the target species for pro-

tection under the Bird City Wisconsin program. Event Schedule 6:30 p.m. - Geneva Lake Museum (255 Mill St.) William P. Mueller is back to discuss the changing patterns of bird migration in the Midwest. Refreshments will be served. William P. Mueller is the Project Coordinator of MCAMMP/ Milwaukee BIOME Project, Conservation Chair of the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology, Ornithologist at Western Great Lakes Bird and Bat Observatory and a member of the Wisconsin Bird Conservation Initiative (WBCI) Issues Committee. 7:15 p.m. - Museum Rear Parking Lot Bring a blanket and lawn chair, and watch the show as hundreds of birds swirl into the Geneva Lake Museum chimney in just minutes! For more information, contact Lake Geneva City Hall at (262) 248-3673. Special thanks to Carl Schwartz, Bird City Wisconsin, and William P. Mueller, Milwaukee BIOME Project.

Author presenting at LG library The Lake Geneva Public Library will host Lake Geneva native, author and publisher Barb Krause with a program on historical

summer homes on Thursday, Sept. 12, at 6:30 p.m. Krause is with the At the Lake Magazine. She will present “Lake Geneva: Explore the Lakeshore and its Lineage.” During a Power Point presentation, she will explore the history of prominent mansions on Geneva Lake from Wrigley to Selfridge and Crane. For more than a century, Lake Geneva has been the summer home of Chicago’s richest families and most affluent businessmen. The audience will learn about the histories of some of the patriarchs who first built homes in Lake Geneva near the turn of the 19th century and will discover which descendants still have ties to the lake. A question and answer session and book signing of At the Lake Magazine’s newest publications and recentlyreleased Geneva Lake Shore Path Guide will follow the program. Krause is publisher of Nei-Turner Media Group, a local company that also publishes Experience Wisconsin, Wisconsin Meetings and other regional magazines. She also co-authored Geneva Lake: Stories from the Shore, Geneva Lake Reflections: More Stories From the Shore, and the Geneva Lake Shore Path Guide. She lives in the Maple Park Historic District

tHE 2013 Football Contest Starts Sept. 5 Play and you could win a check for $50! Here’s how you play: Each week pick the winners of the NFL or college football games listed on the participating sponsors. Get the most right and win! 1st place wins a $50 check. 2nd place receives a $25 gift certificate good at any of the participating sponsors. Contest begins Sept. 5th, 2013. The Football Challenge will run weekly in the Lake Geneva Regional News.

with her husband, Todd, and three daughters. Everyone is welcome to attend this program and book signing at no charge. For more information, call the library at (262) 2495299 or visit the website at www.lakegeneva.lib.wi.us.

A former library employee who stole nearly $100,000 from the city has made about $13,000 in restitution payments, according to the Walworth County Clerk of Courts office. In October 2008, Mercedes A. Mogensen, now 49, pleaded guilty to four felony charges, two counts of theft from a business setting and two counts of misconduct in office. The city’s insurance company paid the city for most of the theft, but the city needed to cover its deductible, which was a little more than $1,000. Mogensen pays the Department of Corrections directly, and the state sends money to the victims, the city and its insurance company. The city has seen some of the money, City Comptroller Peg Pollitt said. This year the city received a little more than $50 from Mogensen, Pollitt said. The Regional News filed a formal open records request with the city to receive copies of payments that Mogensen has made. According to city documents, the last payment the city received was for $18.54, which leaves Mogensen’s balance with the city at $877.31. On May 13, 2009, Mogensen was sentenced to five years of probation. As a condition of her probation she had to serve 60 days in the county jail with work-release privileges. She also was ordered to pay $97,546 in restitution. Judge James Carlson ordered that she pay $950 a month toward her restitution. Mogensen has just entered the final year of her probation. If she had followed Carlson order to pay $950 a month, she would have already paid more than $45,000 in restitution. If Mogensen fails to pay back her restitution, her probation could be extended. If her probation isn’t extended, the city and its insurance company can enter a judgment against Mogensen. The judgment would allow the city and its insurance company to collect money from Mogensen until she paid off her debt.


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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Voters to decide on Woods expansion By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net GENEVA — On Nov. 5, voters will decide whether Woods School can spend $5.55 million to add about 22,000 square feet onto its existing building. In an Aug. 21 interview, Woods Administrator Ed Brzinski said if approved, the project will annually cost district property owners $100,000 per $100,000 of assessed value. The last time Woods went to referendum for a building project was in 2001, Brzinski said. “The board was very conscious of the impact on the taxpayers,” he said about the proposed $5.55 million project. “On the other hand, the best time to borrow money is now, because interest rates are low and we can refinance some of our existing debt in 2014.” Four major points to the referendum project are: n To construct a middle school regulation-sized gymnasium, with a 30-foot-high ceiling. n To add six classrooms and storage space. n To revise the main entrance and improve security. n To revamp the kitchen, making it ready to someday allow the school to provide hot lunch. Brzinski said lack of space and security concerns are crucial motivators behind this project, which began when a committee was established in December 2011. “They’ve been looking at these issues for quite a while and we’ve essentially utilized all our existing space for instruction,” he said. “When you’re flipping classrooms all the time, it’s rough.” Flipping? That’s what they call it when they use a room for several different functions. For example, in a previous interview, Brzinski said the gym isn’t just a gym. They use it as a cafeteria, an auditorium and, last year, as a science classroom. But even when used as a gym, Brzinski said despite its beautiful architecture, the room is not big enough. “Our gym right now, we worry about

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ON NOV. 5, the Woods School Board will ask voters to approve this $5.55 million project — a roughly 22,000-square-foot addition that features a new gymnasium and six classrooms. safety constantly,” he said. “There’s no room for spectators, no room for storage.” How is that a safety concern? “Just because, for instance, right now, there’s not a lot of area around the playing surface. It’s a small court already, (with) at most six feet on one side of the edge of the playing surface. There’s less than that on the other.” It’s so small, Brzinski said, that volleyball teams from other schools won’t play there. “We’ll hold our home meets at their schools,” he said. “But I mean, it’s a beautiful room. We’re still going to utilize it as a cafeteria and auditorium.” And what does the public think? Brzinski said one person attended the

Aug. 14 meeting when the board decided to go to referendum. “We’ve had no negative reaction at this point,” he said about the proposed project. History of support In 2001, the majority of Woods residents approved a referendum to add five classrooms and a stage, said Brzinski. Before that, the last time there was a referendum for a building project was in the early 1970s, he said. “The community has always been very supportive,” Brzinski said. But the economy in 2001 was not what it is today. How will that shape the outcome of the Nov. 5 election?

“I think it’s always a concern, and that’s why I think that it’s important to get the message out to the taxpayers,” Brzinski said. That message includes making Woods School more secure, he said. The question is, when other nearby school districts such as Reek experienced difficulty in obtaining approval for projects, how is Woods going to convince taxpayers? Brzinski said the difference between Woods and the Reek referendums is that Reek’s involved fixing problems incurred during a previous building project. “The Woods School referendum is mostly for additional space, and it’s space that is needed,” he said. “And whether we have 200 students or 150 students, we really owe it to the taxpayers to increase the safety of the building.” Two public forums, where information will be discussed and available on the project, have been tentatively scheduled for: n Wednesday, Sept. 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. n Thursday, Oct. 17, from 6 to 8 p.m. Brzinski said he’s not just looking at the proposed $5.55 million project from the standpoint of school administrator. He lives in the Woods School District. “I’m a taxpayer here, and I look at it as money well spent,” Brzinski said. “I look at it as something the community will use for decades to come.”

Project calls for revising school entrance Change will increase security, limit access to building By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net GENEVA — It’s the kind of thing that Woods School Principal Ed Brzinski said keeps him awake at night, a security issue he said the proposed $5.55 million referendum project would address. “When someone enters that front door, they can immediately go into the rest of our building,” Brzinski said.

Truckload Sale

But wait, doesn’t the school have a front entrance which unlocks only when front office staff triggers the unlock button? Yes, but that entrance provides instant access to the school’s main corridor. Students or someone leaving the school can potentially allow a visitor to enter Woods School without going through the front office and signing in. “Even though we tell kids not to open that door, sometimes they might,” Brzinski said. “That’s the wild card. Students are polite. They might recognize a face (but) we should have control over who enters the building.” Or there are situations such as the one Aug. 21. The school floors were being waxed and visitors were directed to enter the school through a door which leads directly into the gym, where volleyball practice was taking place. Brzinski said so far, they have been fortunate. “Since I’ve been here, the only issues have been that we’ve occasionally had someone enter the building and not check into the office,” he said. “So then Kathy (Smiley, who handles office/attendance duties) or myself will have to chase them down and get them to sign in.” Revised entrance plan One facet of the Woods referendum project is revising the entrance so that people who enter have to go through the front office. Basically, another set of double doors would be added in

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Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co. 315 Broad Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Mailing address: Post Office Box 937, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Phone: 262-248-4444 • Fax: 262-248-4476 Periodicals postage paid at Lake Geneva, WI Official Newspaper City of Lake Geneva Lake Geneva Area Elementary (Joint 1) School District Badger High School District Bloomfield, Geneva, Linn and Lyons Townships Village of Genoa City Brookwood School District Traver School District Woods School District Williams Bay School District Village of Williams Bay Village of Fontana Fontana School District Walworth School District Big Foot High School District

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ANOTHER FACTOR in the Woods School referendum project is the redesigning of the main entrance. Principal Ed Brzinski said with this plan, people will have to pass the main office before they can enter the school. the main corridor. Brzinski said the office staff would be able to see who is visiting once they enter the building — a feature that’s lacking currently — and they would have to sign in before they are allowed access through the second set of doors. The new set of doors,however,would not prevent someone from entering what’s used now as the kindergarten classroom, but Brzinski said that space would become a board/community room, if the project were implemented. Other aspects of the proposed referendum project include: n A 22,000-square-foot addition, which includes a new gym, six classrooms and storage space. n Upgrading kitchen equipment to comply with requirements necessary in order to offer a hot lunch program. Voters will decide the fate of the proposed $5.55 million project Nov. 5, Brzinski said. He said he thinks the board will find success if it conveys the message that the school needs extra space and there are safety concerns. The big security flaw right now, he said, is being able to limit access to the building. “We just don’t want anything to happen,” said Brzinski. “We’re trying to be proactive.”


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

5A

LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS

COUNTY REPORT

Judge Koss’ first year on the bench By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net ELKHORN — Judge Philip Koss said he wouldn’t have been ready to take the bench 10 years ago. He isn’t even sure if he could have done the job three years ago. It isn’t the workload or the responsibility that Koss said he couldn’t have handled, but instead he said he would have struggled with the slower pace of sitting on the bench. Koss, who served as the Walworth County District Attorney for more than 20 years, said he also would have missed litigating cases. On Aug. 9, Koss sat down with a Regional News reporter to discuss his first year as judge. In 2012, before taking the bench, Koss also sat down with the Regional News to discuss his career as district attorney. When preparing to exit his secondfloor office to move up to the third floor, Koss said he thought he would miss prosecuting cases when the first big crime occurred in Walworth County. On Aug. 9, Koss said he remembers making that comment, but when the last big case broke, he didn’t feel as if he was missing out. “I thought it would be difficult not to try cases,” he said. “You define yourself as a Wyatt Earp, a gunslinger.” During his last jury trial as a prosecutor, a sexual assault case involving young children, Koss said he felt a sense of relief when the young victim finished testifying.

In criminal court, “It was a heavy “Judges get in during sentencing burden that is no trouble when hearings, defendants longer hanging on me,” often paint themselves he said. they have preIsn’t there a lot of conceived ideas as good people, who made a single mistake. pressure for judges on where a case “In family court, to make correct rulshould go,” Judge it is good people at ings? After all, no judge wants to have a Philip Koss said. their worst,” Koss said. “Criminal court is bad ruling overturned by people at their best.” an appeals court. In the family court system Koss has “That was always around in some heard a lot of cases, in which the judge ways,” he said. “What tactics are used and decides the case based on the evidence. what evidence is presented.” He also had one jury trial. However, as a judge, Koss has never “I can’t image trying to run a jury trial had a decision overturned by an appeals if I never had one,” he said. court. After that occurs, maybe that feelAs a prosecutor, Koss would question ing will change. decisions judges made, especially when those rulings adversely affected his cases. On the bench Now, as a judge, Koss said his underKoss has years of experience in crimistanding of those decisions hasn’t nal prosecution, and when he took the bench he was immediately put in charge changed. “Judges are as good as the informaof family court. He said he took a family law seminar tion that is presented by the attorneys,” Koss said. “Some of the decisions I wasn’t and mentored with other judges. Judge happy about, maybe I didn’t give the judge David Reddy, who oversaw the family court before Koss, and Family Court Com- enough information.” He also is now ruling on cases that are missioner Kristen Drettwan, who worked being argued by assistant district attorfor Koss as an assistant district attorney, neys he hired and worked closely with. also have helped him. “I think they have handled it well when “There is a steep learning curve,” Koss said. “A lot of the decisions are based on I’ve ruled against them,” he said. judging credibility.” What’s different In family court, the stakes may not be As district attorney, Koss supervised a as high for society as they are in criminal staff of 16, and he regularly fielded phone court, but they are every bit as high for calls from police, victims, the media and those involved.

Village OKs lawn ordinance By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net BLOOMFIELD — Village President Ken Monroe said unkept lawns have become a common complaint over the last five years. When banks foreclose on houses, the lawns at those unoccupied residences become shaggy and overgrown. So neighbors would complain. Monroe said he would call the banks and request that they send someone to cut the lawns. And then he’d wait. That used to be all the village and Monroe could do. Until now. On Aug. 5, the village board Monroe adopted an ordinance that enables the village to hire a contractor or have village employees cut those overgrown lawns and charge the property owner for the costs. “So, when we get a complaint, we’ll send a registered letter or hang a notice on the door, and they’ll have, I think, 10 days to take care of it,” Monroe said. “If they don’t respond, our ordinance says we can hire someone to cut the lawn or we ourselves can do it.” He said before the ordinance, he would call banks and, most times, “they’d just ignore us.” Monroe said one foreclosed house was owned by a bank in Texas. “I called them a couple times and never got a response,” he said. Another time, he asked a Realtor to mow the lawn on a property that was for sale.

LOCAL NOTE Travel Club meets Sept. 6 The Friday, Sept. 6 meeting for the Travel Club of Walworth County will be at Matheson Memorial Library Community Room in Elkhorn from 10 to 11 a.m. Signup will continue for the Oct. 21 trip to see the “Magnificent Churches of Chicago” and the threeday trip from Oct. 9 to 11, “Autumn on the Mississippi.” Signup for the Nov. 15 trip to hear Denny Diamond at the White Fence Farms in Romeoville, Ill., will begin. The program for this meeting will be Gary Cox with his live birds of prey. Visitors and new members are always welcome. Call Rachel at (262) 7431555 with questions.

“If the grass is waist-high or better, who’s going to buy it?” Monroe asked. But Monroe said of the eight or so complaints reported last year, only about half of them were addressed. Now, they will be addressed directly — either by the village’s highway department or a contractor, he said. Either way, the property owner of a lawn cut by the village will receive a special assessment on the tax bill, Monroe said.

attorneys. By design, judges interact with all of these groups less frequently. “This is more isolated, the pace is slower,” Koss said. As DA, Koss was responsible for creating a budget and administrating an office. “I miss everyone. I don’t miss supervising 16 people,” he said. As a judge, Koss is more dependent on other people. “Your time is not your own,” he said. Judges wait and watch as attorneys present evidence. “Judges get in trouble when they have preconceived ideas on where a case should go,” Koss said. “I try to be quiet and listen. Everybody who comes into the court system needs to be treated with respect.” Last career stop Short of the president calling him and asking him to serve on the Supreme Court, Koss said it isn’t likely that he will serve on another bench. In Wisconsin, there are two higher courts, the appeals court and the state Supreme Court, which are both elected positions. Neither appeal to Koss. “There is no contact at all with people there,” he said. Appeals court judges review documents, transcripts and motions. They then issue written opinions on the cases. “It’s like writing a term paper every week,” Koss said. “I enjoy being right here, living in the community.”

WHAT’S HAPPENING Open house Aug. 31 GENEVA — The Lake Como Beach Property Owners Association will host an open house Saturday, Aug. 31, at its newly restored clubhouse, W3730 Clubhouse Drive. The free event is from 1 to 3 p.m. Later that night is the association’s End of Season dance. The dance is from 7 to 11 p.m. The Underdogs will perform. Admission is $5.

Some restrictions apply. Ask stylist for details. Expires 9/30/13

Some restrictions apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 9/30/13

Some restrictions apply. Not valid with other offers. Expires 9/30/13


6A

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Building blocks both real and academic Expansion at Eastview, grade Meet the area’s new teachers rearangement, computer changes greet students The expansion of Eastview School is probably the most visible change on the educational landscape this year, but the Lake Geneva district also has other plans as the school year begins. The Eastview expansion will include a new gym. But more significant from an academic point of view is that Eastview and its sister school, Central Denison, are swapping some grades as well. Starting this fall, Eastview will be fourth and fifth grades only and Central Denison will become a 4K through third grade building. Both schools had been 4K through fifth grade. At Lake Geneva Middle School more math has been added to the curriculum. “Students will receive the equivalent of two and one-half more class periods for math in grades six, seven and eight,” district Superintendent James Gottinger said in the district’s Community Report publication. All Lake Geneva elementary schools will be part of a pilot program for Chromebooks this year. The Chromebooks, which cost about $259 each, will be kept in a cart at each building which can be wheeled into classrooms as needed. “In minutes, the room will be converted to a fully functioning computer lab,” said Dan Schmidt, the district’s director of technology. The district will analyze how learning is affected by the use of the Chromebooks, “which might help us fully commit to a one-to-one solution — supplying every learner with a device,” Schmidt said. Expansion in technology will also position the district to deal with a new online assessment program called Smarter Balanced Assessments, which will start in the 2014-2015 school year. The plan is to install a wireless infrastructure that will increase bandwith. This summer the Windows XP operating system was replaced with Windows 7, Schmidt said in a report. “Smarter Balanced online declared that their individual assessments will work on older devices, but we decided to get ahead of the curve and update in order to get away from older operating systems that don’t or won’t have vendor support,” Schmidt said.

NEW BADGER HIGH SCHOOL teachers are, front row: from left, Alexis Rusch, science; Brynn Wessberg, English as a second language instructor; Jaime Knape, school psychologist; and Shannon Previte, science. Back row: Natalie Salkowski, science; Emily Stipek, PE-health; Angela Yager, family and consumer science; Rebecca Slauson, math; Jacob Popanda, tech ed; and Bryan Kaplan, social studies.

STAR CENTER will welcome Heather Robertson, an English as a second language instructor, and Julie Milligan in guidance.

NEW LAKE GENEVA MIDDLE SCHOOL instructors are front row, from left, Tara Wagner, family and consumer science; Cora Hyndman, 8th grade and Alyssa Markunson, 6th grade. Back row Jon Weiss, 7th grade; Aaron Zorn, 8th grade, Jim Gornick, band instructor. CENTRAL DENISON TEACHERS new this year are, from left, Rona Coltman, art; Reyna Nicia and Elizabeth Thompson, both English as a second language instructors; Susan Peterson, speech and language; and Amy Stanfield, music.

PHOTOS BY JOY KOWALD

NEW EASTVIEW TEACHERS are, from left, Naomi Turk, 4th grade; Rona Coltman, art; Kevin Visona, special education; Julie Milligan, guidance; and Stacy Smith, reading.

www.cattreekingdom.org


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

7A

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Magee, Lake Lawn, LGRN to be honored Lake Geneva Chamber of Commerce holding annual meeting

T

hree awards will be handed out by the Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce at its annual meeting Sept. 11. The award for Outstanding Citizen is going to Larry Magee, who died earlier this year. His wife, Vern, will accept the award. Magee lived in Lake Geneva nearly his entire life having moved from Fennimore when he was 10 years old. He went to school, married, raised his family and worked in southeastern Wisconsin for the telephone company. Magee “dedicated much of his retirement years to giving back to the community,” according to a press release from the chamber. “Larry knew every back road (and county letter designation) and ‘shortcut’ through his work in the area,” the press release said. He did telephone work on many of the old lakeshore estates and was involved in the telephone wiring during the building of Grand Geneva (formerly the Playboy Club). Larry enjoyed traveling, but Lake Geneva was always home. “He recognized that a community is a reflection of the people and as such, it was his thoughtfulness and care of the town where he was educated, worked and raised his family that prompted him to run for alderman of the Lake Geneva City Council,” the chamber said. “As anyone who has served in a leadership role for a municipality, a church or any nonprofit, the leadership jobs are labors of love and demand much time and patience with a true long-term vision balanced with a diligence to accomplish results in the short-term. Larry did just this for Lake Geneva and all the citizens.” He served on the city council from 1994 to 1998 and again from 2002-2008. He was the mayor’s aldermanic representative on the utility commission from 2004-2008 and on a variety of city committees. When he was on the council, Magee supported the renovation of the Riviera Beach House, a beautiful new beach entrance building, enhanced sidewalks around Library Park, a new city hall and police headquarters, an additional water tower for the growing population, an attractive and functional business industrial park, numerous public spaces for children and the city’s support of the Geneva Lake Museum.

“He recognized that a community is a reflection of the people and as such, it was his thoughtfulness and care of the town where he was educated, worked and raised his family that prompted him to run for alderman of the Lake Geneva City Council,” the chamber wrote. When Magee’s term ended in 2008, he continued to serve the community and was appointed as a citizen representative on the utility commission acting as the secretary at the time of his death in April. “Larry was conscientious of his responsibilities and duties of the volunteer work entrusted to him,” the press release said. “If you ask those who worked with him or anyone who talked with him about a Lake Geneva topic, he listened, he thought about the varied perspectives and he was always looking toward the benefit of the community now and for the future. Larry was a citizen who enjoyed living in this area and gave freely of his time so others could enjoy it, too.” The 2013 Community Betterment Award recipient is John Halverson/ Lake Geneva Regional News. The chamber press release noted that Halverson, the general manager and editor of the Regional News has spent almost 40 years in the newspaper business. He worked on both daily and weekly papers as a reporter, columnist, editor and general manager. He was general manager of The Week, a Walworth County feature paper, for almost 20 years. Halverson joined the Lake Geneva Regional News in 2009 as general manager. Editor was added to his title in 2012. The Regional News has won several state and national awards, including the general excellence award recognizing it as the best paper in the state of its size when judged against other papers for editorial quality. Besides the general excellence award, it also won first place in its circulation class for “Web Excellence” In addition, the paper’s ReelLifeTV product won two firsts. The 2013 Lake Geneva Convention & Visitors Bureau Hospitality Award recipient is the Lake Lawn Resort. “Since reopening under new management in 2011, Lake Lawn has received more than $7 million in capi-

SUBMITTED

LARRY AND VERN MAGEE at the Geneva Lake Museum in December 2010 standing near his Ford Model A. The late Larry Magee will be honored at the chamber event. tal improvements, renovations and additions,” the press release said. Facilities have expanded to include the full-service Calladora Spa, Isle of Capri Café, and Lakewood complex featuring 48 rooms and suites along with a new outdoor pool and lakeside fire pit. Lake Lawn has also updated its lobby and main entrance, expanded the golf pro-shop, added new pontoons and speedboats to their marina’s fleet, and relocated their fitness center to provide sweeping lake views. Lake Lawn’s grounds have been transformed through beautification efforts such as the addition of 200 new trees, vibrant landscaping along the front drive and planting of colorful flowerbeds throughout. Chamber President John Stensland welcomes the opportunity to join all Lake Geneva area residents and congratulate this year’s award recipients. The event is from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Grand Geneva. It is open to the public; a fee is charged. Evening arrangements include a dinner buffet. Wine and beer are included. Cocktails are available for purchase. Additional information and tickets are available from the Chamber at 201 Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva or by calling (262) 248-4416.

News You Can Share

LAKE GENEVA POLICE REPORTS Aug. 12

Aug. 15

4:03 a.m.: Officers went to the 200 block of Timber Lane for a loud noise complaint. Dakota Corbett Conell, 28, Lake Geneva, was cited for possession of THC and possession of drug paraphernalia.

12:30 a.m.: An officer stopped a vehicle on Mill near West Main streets. Ronald L. Reiter, 45, Bristol, was cited for failure to obey a traffic sign or signal and operating while under the influence, first offense.

Aug. 13 4:09 p.m.: An officer went to the 400 block of Sheridan Springs for a complaint of a theft. After an investigation, Austin J. Sommers, 20, Lake Geneva, was cited for theft and operating a vehicle after suspension and released.

Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews

Aug. 18 12:29 a.m.: Officers were dispatched to the 700 block of West Main Street for a report of a fight. Timothy Charles Schlitz, 24, Lake Geneva, was cited for disorderly conduct - involved in a fight.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Raise/Connors said pay is to defray costs of job During the Aug. 5 committee of the whole meeting, City Clerk Mike Hawes presented a pay study of city council and village boards, mayors and village presidents in Wisconsin municipalities with populations between 5,000 and 15,000. He found that the median pay for mayors and village presidents was $7,200 and $3,600 for council members and trustees. Hill said she didn’t relish hashing out the reasons for increasing council and mayor compensation again. But she pointed out that those who sit around the council table bring a great deal of experience to city policy making. “Some of us at this table have skill sets that are providing $80,000 to $100,000 in services to the city,” Hill said. And the amount of compensation is small, she said. “We’re talking about real money here, but we’re not talking about real compensation,” Hill said. “You do more than $7,500 worth of work,” she said to Connors. Lyon argued that going five years without considering the level of compensation for council members and the mayor is unacceptable. He said the city needs a systematic method of reviewing pay for the mayor and council and determining reasonable raises in a reasonable amount of time. Wall argued that the state median for council and village board pay stands at $3,600, which puts the raises approved by the council out of line with the state. He said the council gave staff a 3 percent raise and a 2 percent stipend. “I don’t think we need to go beyond 5 percent,” Wall said.

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Mott said that when he ran for alderman, he didn’t realize council members were paid. However, he said that if the raises approved for the council and mayor were averaged out over the past five years, they would come to less than 5 percent per year. Taggart said the raises would have a small impact on the city budget, and they seemed in line considering it was the council that set the pay for other city employees. Connors said he doesn’t see the council and mayor’s pay as a “salary.” Rather, said Connors, it is a stipend paid to defray the costs of travel and working as an elected city official.

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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Pioneer/Some believe the city used old headstones as riprap for lake On the surface, Pioneer Cemetery looks half empty. But just under the grass, it is hallowed ground through and through. A map of gravesites, put together by the Lake Geneva Girl Scout Troop in 1976, indicates that nearly anywhere a visitor walks in the cemetery is a grave site, Quinn said, as he unfolded a copy of the Girl Scouts’ map on his kitchen table. Quinn, a member of the Lake Geneva Historical Commission, said the commission had been lobbying for years to get the cemetery opened to the public. Genealogists and relatives of those buried there complained to the city council that it was almost impossible to reach anyone to make a reservation to visit the cemetery. Quinn said cemetery commissioner and Alderman Sturg Taggart was instrumental in getting the cemetery commission to change its policy. Past cemetery commissioners said that the cemetery was closed because of some acts of vandalism that occurred in the 1970s. Quinn, however, said he doesn’t believe that any intentional vandalism was done in the park, or if there were, it was very minor. Quinn said he tries to meet with visitors to the cemetery. He doesn’t mind showing a newcomer around the cemetery, and he can pull copious tidbits of information about those buried here directly from memory. Lewis Goodsell and Dr. Phillip Maxwell, two of the original seven founders of Lake Geneva, rest here. Maxwell and his wife, Jerusha, rest under the largest marker in the cemetery, Quinn said.

Also buried here are Asa Farr, a lawyer and Union Army lieutenant killed in action. His home became the city’s first public library, and is now the site of the Lake Geneva Public Library. Known only by their first initials and family names, carpenters A.B. Conant and O.T. LaSalle and his son C.O. LaSalle, rest here. These carpenters built most of what was early Lake Geneva with their own hands, Quinn said. Conant and LaSalle streets are named after them. Why they used only their initials is unknown, Quinn said. It is how they were known in life, and it is how they are identified on their grave markers. Once, Robert Wells Warren, also one of the city’s seven founders, was buried here. But when Oak Hill Cemetery opened in the 1880s, Warren’s remains, and those of a number of other former Pioneer residents, were moved to Oak Hill, Quinn added. The street east of Pioneer Cemetery is named after Warren. Quinn said those who have visited the cemetery were looking for the final resting places of ancestors and relatives. And they didn’t have to be well-known relatives, either. In a very touching gesture, one visitor left a pot of daisies on the grave of a young child named Moon, who died in the 1880s. No one knows who was first buried in Pioneer Cemetery. The last burial there was in 1977, when Evelyn Rich Mahoney was laid to rest. Born in 1893, she lived well into the 20th century.

CHRIS SCHULTZ/ REGIONAL NEWS

WITH KEYS TO THE GATE, Patrick Quinn acts as the sexton for Pioneer Cemetery. He opens the gates daily to historians, genealogists and family members looking for long-departed relatives.

Quinn said burials continued in Pioneer into the 1970s because “if you owned a plot here, you could still get buried here.” If there is any group that permanently changed the face of the cemetery, it was the city itself, Quinn said. Quinn showed a photo of himself as a young child flanked by his late mother and late father. In the background, the cemetery can be clearly seen and a line of headstones is clearly visible. Those headstones are now gone. In the past, when upright tombstones broke off, cemetery or city staff would set the broken markers into the turf, turning them into ground level grave markers.

However, sometime in the 1950s and 1960s, city workers began to pick up the broken markers, which were then stacked on the north side of the cemetery. The stack of broken markers grew into a wall about five feet tall, said Quinn. And then one day, the broken headstones were loaded into a dump truck and taken somewhere. Where they went is now a mystery, Quinn said. One story has the city dumping the headstones into Geneva Lake to act as riprap. But Quinn said he believes they were taken to the old city dump, which is now the Four Seasons Nature Preserve.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Martin/Local artist is behind Mister Boffo, Cats with Hands and others Martin said he fills two or three notebooks with notes and jokes a week. He gets about 26 jokes out of that. “You have to write every single day,” Martin said. “If I don’t write for even a day, it’s hard to get a joke the next day.”

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Though he spends hours each morning writing jokes, he doesn’t call it work. “I’m one of those crazy people that earn money without really working,” Martin said. “I have one of those jobs that’s not really a job. I’d do it for nothing. I did it for nothing for years.” Martin said before his comics were accepted at the SunTimes, he sent comics to magazines weekly. “I was 27 years old,” he said. “Every week, I would send out jokes to the magazines. I had done that for 16 years. I would send something. I never got any acceptance. I got a lot of rejection letters where they’d ask me to never send them anything again.” Martin’s first comic strip was about a man who ran an employment agency. “I wrote the jokes about myself instead of the off-the-wall things I didn’t have an understanding of,” he said. Today, 90 percent of his jokes are based on real-life situations. “I sit around Starbucks, and I listen to people’s conversations,” Martin said. “I take little snippets from one person and mix that with another person’s. Then I end up with a joke.” Many of his characters are based on exaggerated versions of himself. “Characters really turn out to be warped versions of yourself,” Martin said. “I think all writers do that. They kind of project themselves in their characters. Boffo is the crazy version of myself.” Boffo is the main character in Martin’s long-running Mister Boffo comic strip. “Boffo is always working some plan or thinking someone is conspiring against him. That’s the crazy side of me,” he said. “His dog is looking out at the audience thinking this guy is crazy.” Often Martin will turn a sour situation in his own life into a comic. “I write a lot of jokes where I get even,” he said. “I was on hold recently with Time Warner for about an hour and half. I have a joke coming up about the best thing to chew when your Time Warner correspondent comes back.” Even his lawyer is not exempt from his comic strip jokes.

“I got a lot of rejection letters where they’d ask me to never send them anything again,” Joe Martin said about the start of his career. “This is a great joke,” Martin said. “I recently sold a house, and the lawyer at the closing charged me $575. He didn’t do anything at all. I called and asked him why. He explained why he didn’t do anything, then he sent me a bill for $175 for explaining why he didn’t do anything.” This same situation shows up in Mr. Boffo’s strip. “Boffo’s friend says, ‘Imagine what he would have charged you if he did something’,” Martin said. “That’s all based on a real-life experience.” One of the keys to Martin’s success is his ability to laugh at life. “You have to look at everything in life with a little sense of humor and twist it around,” he said. “I write 26 jokes a week. I have to find humor about every minute and a half of the day.” He never has to fight with writer’s block, either. “All day long, I think I’m writing the funniest jokes in the world,” he said. “Then I get home, and I go over these jokes with my wife at the end of the day. That’s when I find out that I didn’t write anything funny. In effect, I probably had writer’s block, but I didn’t know it.” His syndication company, Neatly Chiseled Features, also offers animated comic strips to newspapers. Using a smartphone QR code scanner, newspaper readers can see and hear a comic strip in action. “We’re the first ones, the only ones, to do that,” Martin said. Martin has musical talents along with his humor. “My focus right now is on music,” he said. “Tell the readers to listen to my Christmas song. It’s on YouTube. It’s called ‘My Dream of Christmas’ and subtitled ‘Five Naked Ladies’.” The video is an animated version of the Mr. Boffo comic, and Martin sings an original song. “The reason I have all these songs is because before I write my jokes every day, I loosen up by writing and singing some songs,” Martin said. “So in addition to writing 40,000 jokes, I also probably have about 20,000 songs. I’m waiting for someone to tell me his uncle is a producer at a record label.”

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Have a Safe Holiday Weekend!


August 29, 2013

SCHOOL’S OPEN

PROTECT OUR CHILDREN DRIVE SAFELY

The Regional News

9A

WATCH FOR SIGNALS AND FLASHING LIGHTS

NEVER PASS A SCHOOL BUS WHEN IT’S STOPPED

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10A

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

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Geneva Lake West Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Thursday, August 29, 2013 Serving Walworth, Fontana, Williams Bay and Walworth County

B

Playground construction under way

Lifeguards rescue 26 from water

Bourneuf back on board

Water Safety Patrol breaks record for water pullouts

By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net FONTANA — After months of fundraising, the Fontana Elementary School will feature a new playground for its middle school students. Starting in the spring, the Parent Teacher Organization sold bricks for a walk of fame. Money raised from the bricks covered the costs of the playground equipment. District Administrator Sara Norton said she’s really excited about the new equipment. “It’s a really cool plan,” she said. “I think we’re planning an opening for the first day of school.” Installation of the equipment began Aug. 26, and Norton said the volunteer crew ran into some problems at the site, just north of the school building. “We’ve got some major concerns that need addressing,” she said. “We think the area has been tiled. We found that out when we tried to dig a hole and hit water through rock.” Norton said the rock is larger than gravel size and spread throughout the area evenly. Joe McHugh, school board president, and Chadd Hartwig, school board treasurer, both have experience

JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS

SPONSORS for the Fontana Elementary School playground purchased engraved bricks that will be placed along the sidewalk at the school. Along with alumni memorial bricks, many donors had bricks engraved with quotes for students to read while waiting outside.

By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net

Board member appointment With the resignation of school board president Jennifer Keefe earlier this month, the board accepted applications to fill the seat until the April election. Leo Bourneuf, a former school board member, was approved unanimously by the board. McHugh was selected by the board to fill the president seat, and Rebecca Decker was selected to become vice president. Bourneuf was not at the Aug. 26 school board meeting. He left the board in the spring of 2012, after serving for one term, according to Regional News Bourneuf records.

This is a record year for rescues by the Geneva Lake Water Safety Patrol, according to Ted Pankau, the patrol’s director. Although a cool late May and June made for a slow start to the swimming season, a July heat wave brought huge crowds to the 12 public and private beaches patrolled by Water Safety Patrol lifeguards. This year, so far, patrol lifeguards have pulled 26 people from the water who were experiencing difficulties while swimming, Pankau said. A cool stretch since the start of August slowed things down at the beaches for a while. However, a renewed stretch of warm weather brought the beaches back to life. This past weekend, the patrol surpassed last year’s record of 25 pullouts, Pankau said. Pankau The good news is, as of Monday, there have been no fatal accidents on the lake. The last fatality occurred in 2011, Pankau said. Of particular concern this year is warning boaters to not jump of their boats to go swimming unless several precautions are taken. Pankau said there were several near-drownings this summer involving people who, while boating alone, decide to jump off their boat to go swimming. The wind pushes the boat away from the swimmer, and the swimmer then can’t get back into the boat. It’s not illegal to jump off your own boat into the lake, Pankau said. But an ordinance adopted by all communities on Geneva Lake require at least one experienced boater remain onboard when others are in the water, Pankau said. And, it might be a good idea to wear a personal flotation device when going overboard for a dip, he added. This year, state water safety rules now require paddle boards to have a personal flotation device on board.

PLEASE SEE SCHOOL PAGE 3B

PLEASE SEE PANKAU PAGE 3B

JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS

CONSTRUCTION BEGAN Aug. 26 on the middle school playground at Fontana Elementary School. Before this equipment was installed, students had a few benches and broken basketball hoops to use during recess. with professional engineering and plumbing. Norton asked if they could assist with the site. “I think we need your eyes and brains,” she said. “It would be wonderful to have someone who understands all of that.” Bricks have already been placed in front of the school, next to the main entrance.

Professor finishing Shore Path study Survey seeks information on visitors, residents use of path person interview with Van Auken to further discuss the path. “I’ve talked to a few people so far,” he said. “The people The Lake Shore Path may seem like old news to most I’ve talked to all have different experiences using the path. in the Geneva Lake area, but academics from Oshkosh are I hope to interview more people before I (finish).” Rick Steinberg, owner of Lake Geneva Art Supplies, studying its use. Paul Van Auken, professor of sociology at the Univer- spoke with Van Auken about the path. “I got the postcard about the survey in the mail,” Steinsity of Wisconsin Oshkosh, sent postcards to residents in berg said. “I don’t use it every day, but I use it a lot. I walk communities surrounding the lake earlier this summer. in the mornings, I usually head out for 10 or 20 minutes The study was paid for using a UW Oshkosh faculty and then turn around.” development grant. Steinberg said he’s interested in what He said he has received a large number “The respondents over- Van Auken gathers from the study. of responses. whelmingly look at the “It’s neat to look at the way people use “The respondents overwhelmingly look at the path as a major asset to the commu- path as a major asset to the path,” Steinberg said. Though he uses the path frequently, nity,” Van Auken said. “The postcard was the community,” Steinberg hasn’t walked the entire cirsent to a randomly selected list of addresses. As long as I can get to the minimum number UW Oshkosh professor cumference of the lake. Paul Van Auken said. “People are so friendly on the path,” of respondents, then I can say the response Steinberg said. “I’ve had tourists stop out is a representative group.” there, and we just talk. It’s just a friendly atmosphere.” The survey, still available online at tinyurl.com/shoreVan Auken said he’s not worried about path lovers path, asks respondents questions about their use of the skewing his study results. path and their feelings toward it. “Anytime you do something like this, you get what they Van Auken said he’s missing one group of path users. “I’m hoping that I get more of the Chicagoland folks to call self-selection bias,” he said. “You get people that are interested in it. It’s hard to convince people that aren’t fill out the survey,” he said. “I have a strong suspicion that interested in it to do (the survey). It’s just a fact of doing there are quite a few of them in the Lake Geneva area.” this sort of thing. You take it into account the best you He said he’s gotten responses from other Lake Geneva can.” As classes resume at the university after Labor Day, transplants from Florida and California. Van Auken said the study may not be his main focus. At the end of the survey, respondents can set up an inBy Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

FILE PHOTO/REGIONAL NEWS

THE LAKE SHORE PATH was the focus of a recent study by University of Wisconsin Oshkosh professor Paul Van Auken.


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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Treatment plant: please hold the salt said. “The only way to remove (the salt) is a desalinization system like they use on larger cruise ships or where sea water is used for drinking water. If it comes to us (at the plant) as chloride, it leaves as chloride.” The solution is to limit salt at the source, residences and industry in the area. “Industrial chloride competes with residential chloride,” York said. “We’ve talked with the industries here, and they’ve voluntarily complied with our suggestions.” York said changes can save businesses and homeowners money. “We remind people they can keep their (water) softeners tuned up and turn them off when they can,” he said. “If the softener runs on a timer, (it) just recycles the water at regular intervals. If they’re at their regular homes in Illinois or elsewhere, (the softener) is wasting salt and adding chloride to the system.” If the softener is turned off when vacationers leave their summer homes, it saves money on salt and helps reduce the salt put through the water treatment plant.

By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net WALWORTH — The Fontana Walworth Wastewater Treatment Plant flushes two tons of salt down the drain every day. That salt is not a good thing. Doug York, plant superintendent, said the state DNR requires the plant to notify the public about the environmental issues concerning the plant. The salt problem is easily corrected if area homeowners pay attention. “The main thing that most people can take care of (is their water softener),” York said. “More and more people bring more chloride into our system.” Water softeners remove rust and other minerals from the water, and salt water is used to flush the softener. All the removed minerals and salt go into the sewer. “All that really salty water from the softener comes to the plant,” York said. The plant has no way to remove the salt. What comes in, goes right back out. “We don’t have a removal system,” York

FONTANA COURT Jennifer Edwards, a 33-year-old Fontana woman, pleaded guilty to drunken driving Aug. 22. Edwards was cited March 10 after she was pulled over for operating left of the center line. She must attend alcohol awareness classes and have an interlock device installed on her vehicle for 12 months. Charges for driving left of center were dismissed.

York said recirculating systems are used in local industries to save money as well. EPA and DNR “The (U.S.) EPA just basically noticed how close we (the plant) are to Illinois,” York said. “Illinois’ strict limit is 500 milligrams per liter. (The EPA) wanted us to meet Illinois’ standard.” The current standard for chloride in the Fontana Walworth plant is 660 mg/L, which was reduced from 770 mg/L in May. Every five years, the plant receives an operating permit from the DNR. The permit mandates the amount of salt, or chloride, allowed to pass through the plant. “The state of Wisconsin would like to see 400 mg/L as a maximum discharge,” York said. “Not very many plants can meet that limit. That is the goal, though. On average, our plant releases about 500 mg/ L per day. We’re below our limits, but we don’t have a lot of wiggle room in there.” The location of the plant in relation to Illinois increased the standards, but the

plant’s physical location helps it meet the standards. “We can do that because of the dilution from the drain tiles in the farm fields around here,” York said. “If we release 550 mg/L ... once it leaves our plant, it travels a mile and a half through those farm fields. By the time the water reaches Illinois, in general it’s down to about 150 to 175 mg/L of chloride.” Every day, the plant receives water samples from Fontana, Walworth and the Kikkoman plant. “From the analysis of those samples, we keep track of the solids, the chloride levels and any contaminants,” York said. “You take the amount of mg/L ... it was just a couple of weeks ago that a lab manager brought the results up. We started looking at historically how we’ve been doing.” York said the plant has seen reduced chloride levels over the past year, with an increase in the summer. “It was much worse a few years ago before we starting taking the initiative to go to industries and ask for voluntary cooperation,” York said.

Schools welcome new teachers

FONTANA POLICE A 65-year-old Clinton woman was cited for drunken driving Aug. 12. J.M. Tucker Lawton told the Walworth Police she was driving home from Lake Geneva after a wedding. The police report states Tucker Lawton “did not appear to be completely coherent,” and that she had failed to pay previous fines and was driving with a suspended license. She said she had drunk a glass of wine or a cocktail. Tucker Lawton failed three field sobriety tests and refused the preliminary breath test. She was taken to the county jail and “passively resisted” jail staff and another alcohol breath test.

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FONTANA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL welcomed eight new teachers for the 2013-14 school year. From left, front row, Leigh Weiler will teach 4-year-old kindergarten, Jaime Hanneman will teach fifth grade, Annelise Hanson will teach 4-year-old kindergarten, Kristin Zimmerman will teach middle school science and Tim Featherstone will serve the school as guidance counselor. In the back, Kara Lussenden will teach middle school social studies, Michal VanDyke will teach fourth grade and Aaron Judd will teach middle school math.

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WALWORTH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL hired four new teachers for this school year. From left, Kelly Mutter, an 8th grade math teacher, previously taught at St. Patrick Parish School in Elkhorn, Kari Cruz, a kindergarten teacher, has subbed at Walworth Elementary for five years, Caitlin Dowden spent two years in Coleman School District and will teach 3rd grade, and Kim Kleich has taught for eight years and will teach extended learning classes at Walworth.

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August 29, 2013

The Regional News

3B

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Walworth school budgeting for roof repairs By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net WALWORTH — The Walworth Elementary School budget is looking good for the 2013-14 school year. Major repairs for the roof and interior floor tiling are in the budget. School administrative assistant Karie Bourke said keeping the budget looking good depends on many factors. “As of right now, I do have money in the budget for those repairs,” Bourke said at the Aug. 26 board meeting. “It is dependent on what happens with other things if that money stays.” Board President Kelly Freeman suggested the school try to save money over the next few years to cover the costs of those projects. “Based upon the final numbers that come in (on the budget), if there was $2,500

or so left, if we could put that into a separate account,” Freeman said. “If it could go toward a roof replacement because I know that’s coming down the line, it would help us a lot.” Freeman said that in the past, the district has used savings accounts and certificates of deposit to save money for technology improvements in the school. “If we can start saving, year by year, which we have done previously, it’ll help us,” she said. “Even if we still have to go out for a loan, it’s that much less that we have (to borrow). This is just an idea for us to think about.” Bourke said the final budget is dependent on state funding numbers and won’t be ready until later this fall. DOT doesn’t listen Freeman said she’s upset with a letter she received from the Wisconsin Depart-

ment of Transportation earlier this month. “I have an issue with ... the second paragraph, the last sentence,” she said. “(The letter says) The information WisDOT gathered from that process along with previous public information meetings held from 2007 to 2012 helped solidify the selection of this alternative.” The DOT has plans finalized to reroute Highway 14 from its current one-way traffic flow around the village square and Heyer Park to two-way traffic closer to the school. “To me, the way (the letter) is worded, it’s as though we all agreed,” Freeman said. “We were told from the beginning this was their final plan. No matter what we said it didn’t make a difference. They didn’t listen to what we had to say, nor the village, nor the task force, nor the chamber (of commerce).” Freeman suggested the board send a return letter to the DOT and continue to

fight against the proposed plan for the highway. “None of us said, ‘This is a wonderful plan,’” she said. “We didn’t lead with this idea at all.”

LOCAL SCHOOL NOTES opportunities, professional liability coverage and extensive awards and recognition programs. The mission of NAAE is “professionals providing agricultural education for the global community through visionary leadership, advocacy and service.” The NAAE headquarters are in Lexington, Ky.

Big Foot’s agriculture program recognized The agriculture program at Big Foot High School has been selected as the 2013 Wisconsin Outstanding Middle/Secondary School Agricultural Education Program. This award, given by the National Association of Agricultural Educators, recognizes the nation’s most successful agricultural education programs by highlighting the local programs and teachers that achieve success. Winners are educators who have developed an outstanding agricultural education program at either the middle school or high school level. Applicants are judged on a variety of criteria, including teaching philosophy, effective classroom and experiential instruction, development of partnerships, and professional growth. The Big Foot High School agriculture program competed against award winners from surrounding states for the opportunity to be named the 2013 Region III NAAE Outstanding Middle/Secondary School Agricultural Education Program. Regional winners will receive a plaque and expense paid trip to attend the 2013 NAAE convention.

Badger freshman travels with Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp

The Outstanding Middle/Secondary School Agricultural Education Program award is partially sponsored by Monsanto as a special project of the National FFA Foundation. NAAE is the professional organization in the United States for agricultural educators. It provides nearly 8,000 members with professional networking and development

Alexis Wisdom, a freshman at Badger High School, traveled with Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp to Europe this summer as a part of their International Southern Winds Symphonic band, visiting France, Germany and Austria where she played trumpet in concerts at seven different locations during the months of June and July. She attended the Northern Winds tour in the summer of 2012 with Blue Lake where she was chosen to for the summer 2013 tour. She had been meeting with her Southern Winds Symphonic band in Michigan every two months to rehearse for the tour. Forty junior and senior high school stu-

dents from around the country participated in the West Michigan summer arts school’s 43nd annual European tour. Blue Lake’s International Exchange Program began in 1969. Prior to their departure, she spent one week at Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp in intensive rehearsals and preparations for the tour as well as had a preseason Midwest tour in Michigan. In each European country she visited, she stayed with other Blue Lake performers in local homes to learn about local custom and tradition before performing a concert in that particular community. Upon her return from Europe, she presented at a post-tour in Lansing, Mich., along with a final performance with her symphonic band and had a live radio broadcast. Blue Lake is one of America’s largest summer arts schools. Since it opened in 1966, more than 300,000 youth have benefited from the fine arts camp. In addition to music, Blue Lake offers programs in dance, art and theater. It is located on 1400-acre campus in the Manistee National Forest 12 miles north of Muskegon, Mich.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

Pankau/Flyboards new to lake this year Some paddle board users strap the life jacket on back of the paddle board to comply with the law, Pankau said. “You don’t have to wear it, but that would be a good idea,’ Pankau said. New to the lake this year are Flyboards and jet packs, which use highpressure streams of water to lift riders into the air. Although the high-flying devices appear inherently unsafe, there has been no record of accident or injury from their

use, so far, Pankau said. “It’s safe when out in the open water,” he said. Speed is not an issue, either. “They don’t travel very fast,” Pankau said. The state DNR recently ruled that the Flyboards and jet packs must follow personal watercraft (PWC) rules. Otherwise, state regulation of this new form of water recreation is still a work in progress, Pankau said.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

School/District talks priorities New website Board Clerk Lisa Liang has worked over the previous school year to redesign the school’s website. She said during the meeting that the website would be ready for a public launch within the next few weeks. “It’s a complete overhaul,” she said. “If teachers want to update their own class pages, we have (videos) showing them how to do that.” Norton said it was a lot of work for Liang to produce the website. Standards and goals The board members spoke at length about their top priorities for the school McHugh said he wants to make sure every board member is on the same page, and

that school staff knows what the board wants. “That’s the point of having these meetings (an annual board retreat),” McHugh said. “We can cement what we want and let the staff handle it. That way they’re not sitting in there trying to figure out something in the budget that we don’t even really want. If we tell them what we want, they can make it happen.” McHugh said that literacy standards are a major goal for the school, but the board doesn’t need to micromanage how school administration increases student literacy. “I want to come out of that meeting with everyone clear about what our goals are,” he said. “Then the staff can figure out how to make it happen. That part is up to them.”

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4B

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

GENEVA LAKE WEST

FFA students present research in Kentucky By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net WALWORTH — The next generation of agricultural-related researchers are at Big Foot High School. Six current students and one 2013 graduate will present their research experiments at the national FFA competition in Louisville, Ky., in October. Their projects range from egg shells to electrophoresis. Citlaly Leon, a senior, and Brittany Rambatt, a Big Foot graduate, researched the efficiency and environmental impact of inhouse-made biodiesel, market biodisel and E85, a blend of biodiesel and regular fuel. “We compared the calories used and carbon dioxide produced when using both types,” Rambatt said.

The students thought that biodiesel would be better for the environment. They found it less efficient than other fuels. Faith Carpenter, a sophomore, studied the effects of rosemary and alfalfa on chicken growth rate. Monica HealthBrost, a senior, studied economical electrophoresis. Electrophoresis is the analysis of fingerprints at crime scenes. Health-Brost said supplies needed for studying fingerprints is expensive for a classroom.

In her experiment, she studied the use of paper clips in place of more expensive metal supplies. Katy Cavula, a junior, studied how bacteria entered eggs and the effect of washing eggs in different cleaning solutions. C a r l i e O’Donnell, a junior, studied the effects of burying different verimculture on compost. In different samples of composting material, O’Donnell added different food waste. In one sample, she added bananas.

She found that the added material doesn’t always produce the nutrients the material is known for in the compost. MiKayla Grinnell tested the effects of light on meat storage. She had samples of ground beef in refrigeration with different light types on each. Bacteria grew at different speeds under the various light sources. Agriscience teacher Rick Henningfeld said these student projects all won at the state level. “They were selected to advance to the national competition this fall,” Henningfeld said. “(This) means they are in (about) the top 10 in the nation.” The Big Foot agriscience department was also recognized as an outstanding agricultural program by the Wisconsin Association of Agricultural Educators earlier this summer.

AREA TIDBITS Lakeland Players holding auditions for ‘Rocky Horror’ and Christmas shows Actors 18 and older are being sought by the Lakeland Players for their production of “Rocky Horror Show.” The auditions will be at the Walworth County Performing Arts Center, 15 W. Walworth St., Elkhorn, starting 7 p.m. Sept. 8 and 9. To schedule a 10-minute audition, call Barry at (847) 462-9118. Prepare a song from the show and wear appropriate shoes for dance. The Lakeland Players also announces auditions for their upcoming children’s Christmas musical “A Dickens Of A Christmas. “ The auditions will be at the Walworth County Performing Arts Center, 15 W. Walworth St. Elkhorn,from 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 15 and from 4 to 6 p.m. Sept. 16. The production needs 25 to 30 children and young adults 8 to 17 years old. Auditioners should be prepared to sing a short song and wear appropriate shoes for a short dance movement. Call (262) 723-3013 for more information.

Girl Scouts hosting mud fun run Girl Scouts of Wisconsin Badgerland Council will hold One Tough Cookie, a mud fun run for women ages 14 and older, Saturday, Sept. 14, at Oakwood Knoll Girl Scout Camp, East Troy. Girl Scout membership is not required. The 3.1 mile trek, featuring obstacles designed for women of all athletic abilities and fitness levels, is the first of its kind to be designed by women veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The noncompetitive event is aimed at helping women build courage, confidence and character while combining mud, obstacles, trail runs and hundreds of women. One Tough Cookies can sign up in “troops” or as individuals. Race intervals begin at 9 a.m. and run all day. The event is the only mud run that is 100 percent local and 100 percent charitable. All proceeds benefit the 12,000 girls and 4,000 adults served by the council. The entry fee is $35 and registration is $75. Each participant will receive a One Tough Cookie dry-wick T-shirt, dog tags, a free beverage and a guaranteed muddy great time. The finish line will offer live music, food, beverages and plenty of fun. For registration and details, go to www.onetoughcookierun.org.

Lucksinger named director of development Barbara Lucksinger has been named director of development at Michael Fields Agricultural Institute in East Troy. She brings more than 25 years of experience, having served as the lead staff on capital campaigns, consulted with nonprofits and implemented the startup of two development departments. “There are certain times in an organization’s life when you

come across the right person at just the right time and this is one of those times. Lucksinger brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the position and I am confident she will be successful as she implements a fund development program for the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute,” Executive Director David Andrews said. Her role will be to formalize the program, develop the fundraising plan for each year, set goals and coordinate the activities of the fundraising committee and volunteers. The institute will soon celebrate 30 years as an important player in the areas of agricultural research, education and public policy for sustainable agriculture. The nonprofit organization’s mission is to nurture the ecological, social and economic resiliency of food and farming systems through education, research, policy and market development. The work affects the state, the country and beyond.

Hicks displaying works at Brick Street Market Delavan area photographer Jack Hicks will display his art at the Brick Street Market, 104 E. Walworth Ave., Delavan, as part of the First Friday series. He will attend the opening reception on Friday Sept. 6, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. His work will be on display until Sept 26. “John’s Shed,” a photography exhibition of work by Hicks, will be held at Essential Yoga and Massage, 422 N. Wisconsin St., Suite B, Elkhorn, Saturday, Sept. 28, from noon to 6 p.m., and Sunday, Sept.29, from noon to 3 p.m. All works in the show are signed and numbered limited edition photographs. At the end of the show there will be a drawing for a framed, finished copy of the “John’s Shed” photo. Hicks will be present throughout the show. Hicks lives in the Delavan area. He was born in 1947 in Milwaukee and developed an interest in photography at about age 10. His first camera was a black bakelite Spartus 35mm rangefinder that’s still in his camera collection. He has had little formal training in photography, although he attended classes taught by B. Artin Haig in Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Center for Photography for a short time. He found the best way for him to learn photography was to just do it. His background in commercial photography consists of several book covers, a bit of corporate work and many weddings, at one point shooting more than 30 weddings a year. Until about four years ago all of his work was done on film, but with the tremendous improvement in digital technology all of it is now done using several digital single lens reflex cameras. Working in a digital format allows Hicks “to do all of my own color processing with the lights on and not surrounded by toxic chemicals!”

Clean Sweep helps residents manage hazardous product wastes The Walworth County Public Works Department has announced the 2013 Clean Sweep program scheduled Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4 and 5. Clean Sweep plays an important role in preserving local natural resources and benefits everyone by reducing the risk of surface and groundwater pollution and personal injury from chemical exposure. This year’s event will help household residents, farmers, businesses and institutions properly dispose of banned, damaged, unusable or unwanted products that contain volatile chemicals. Products with a warning label on the container generally fit the bill and include things like pesticides, herbicides, waste oil, antifreeze, brake fluid, old fuel, oil and lead-based paint, varnish, adhesives, fluorescent bulbs and rechargeable batteries. Clean sweep services are provided free-of-charge to household residents. The household portion of the event features a pharmaceutical collection to gather up outdated or unwanted prescription drugs and over-the-counter items for proper disposal. Pills, syrups, creams, inhalers and vet/pet meds are all acceptable. Sharps, needles, nebulizers, oxygen

tanks and radioactive materials will not be collected. Household residents may drop off items without an appointment at the following times and places: Friday, Oct. 4 - from 3 to 6 p.m. at the city of Lake Geneva Street Department, 1065 Carey St. Friday, Oct. 4 - from 3 to 6 p.m. at the city of Whitewater Public Works Complex, 150 East Starin Rd. Saturday, Oct. 5 - from 8 a.m. to noon at the Walworth County Pubic Works Department, W4097 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn. Clean sweep program services are also available to farmers, businesses and institutions, but those who are interested must preregister and provide a list of products they want to dispose of. Some restrictions and fees apply. Please call Public Works Department staff for details about this opportunity, or to request a pre-registration form. Clean sweep has helped Walworth County residents properly manage hazardous product wastes since 1992, collecting over 640,000 pounds of material from 10,336 programs participants. Everyone is encouraged to round up their hazardous waste products and set aside some time to participate. For further information please contact Janet Cline, Public Works staff, at (262) 741-3367, or by email at: jcline@co.walworth. wi.us.

Casino supporters press Walker for OK MADISON (AP) — Supporters of plans for a tribal casino in Kenosha are pressing Gov. Scott Walker to green-light the project. The Menominee Nation wants to open an off-reservation casino at the former Dairyland Greyhound Park dog track. Federal officials approved the plan last week but Walker must sign off before anything can happen. Walker has said his approval hinges on no new net gaming, community support and consensus among the state’s tribes. The Forest County Potawatomi, which operates a casino in Milwaukee, opposes the Menominee’s plans. Menominee leaders, southeastern Wisconsin legislators and labor leaders held a press conference at the state Capitol on Tuesday calling on Walker to approve the plans. They say the casino will create thousands of jobs and alleviate poverty on the Menominee’s reservation in northeastern Wisconsin.

Lawmaker wants English as official language MADISON (AP) — A Republican lawmaker has reintroduced a bill that would make English the official language in Wisconsin, saying it will encourage immigrants to learn the language and improve their prospects in the state. Rep. Andre Jacque’s proposal also would require state and local government to write all their documents in English. Exceptions can be made in individual cases as well as to teach another language and protect a criminal defendant’s rights. The bill would not restrict the use of a language other than English for non-governmental purposes. The bill’s prospects are murky at best. Republicans in Washington, D.C, are wrestling with immigration reform as they try to make themselves look more attractive to a broader cross-section of the nation’s population after the GOP lost the 2012 presidential elections. But Jacque, of DePere, is pressing on. In a telephone interview Monday, he said he believes the bill will provide immigrants an incentive to learn English, which in turn will help them find jobs. “Despite a broad spectrum of viewpoints on U.S. education or immigration policy, there is widespread agreement that English proficiency is critical to societal integration, future success and achieving the American Dream,” he wrote in a memo to his fellow lawmakers soliciting co-sponsors. He also noted Monday that more than two dozen states have already made English their official language; 31 states have made English their official language, according to U.S. English, Inc., a citizens action group that works to preserve the language in the United States. “It makes a lot of sense,” Jacque said. “It certainly helps to unify the state.” The measure mirrors a proposal introduced in 2009 by former state Rep. Marlin Schneider, a Wisconsin Rapids Democrat. Schneider got a number of GOP co-sponsors to sign on but Democrats controlled the Legislature that session and they never gave the bill a hearing. Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, R-Burlington, both signed onto Schneider’s bill in 2009 but neither are listed as co-sponsors on Jacque’s version. Their spokespeople didn’t immediately return messages Monday. A spokesman for Republican Gov. Scott Walker, a potential 2016 presidential contender, was noncommittal, saying Walker would evaluate the measure when it comes to his desk. Democratic Rep. JoCasta Zamarripa, of Milwaukee, said her district includes the largest number of Hispanics in the state. She said the measure would prevent her from including Spanish translations with her constituent newsletters.


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

5B

ROBERT IRELAND/ REGIONAL NEWS

CHRISTOPHER SNOW JR., 4, takes aim at the target of a dunk tank on Saturday, Aug. 24, during Kids Day Out in Pell Lake. The 4-year-old Whitewater boy was able to make his mark and send Police Chief Steve Cole into the cold water.

ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS

DOWNTOWN LAKE GENEVA was filled with bargain hunters during Maxwell Street Days this weekend.

SUBMITTED SUBMITTED

MEMBERS OF THE LAKE GENEVA ROTARY CLUB donated school supplies to area students. Pictured are, from left: Rotary members Jim Dailey and Bob Kunkel; students and Lake Geneva schools summer staff Eric Skipper, Andrew Nugent, Nick Merritt and Rotary member Laura Berg. Each year the Lake Geneva Rotary Club accepts donations from community members, area churches and school staff. It has grown to be a large community effort, and many families benefit from the donations.

FORD MOTORS awarded Kunes Country Ford-Lincoln of Delavan with the prestigious “Presidents Award” for 2012. This award is claimed by fewer than 10 percent of their dealers nationwide. Appearing at the award ceremony on Aug. 22 (left to right) are: Kevin Campo (Chicago Regional Manager, Ford Motors), Bob Gardner (Group Service Director, Kunes Country Auto Group), Gregg Kunes (President, Kunes Country Auto Group), Bill Unyi (Chicago Zone Sales Manager, Ford Motors), and Dennis Kramer (Group Operations Director, Kunes Country Auto Group).

“Thanks Reel Life TV. The video turned out great and Phil was so easy to work with. Looking forward to working together again.

The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its readers to submit photos of charitable events, personal milestones and school activities for publication. We also accept unique photos of wildlife and nature. Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution and be at least 6 inches wide. The photos must be in focus and have a natural color distribution. The Regional News may alter the color on photos and crop them. We use editorial discretion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pictures must be identified. Submitted pictures may also appear online at ww.facebook.com/ LakeGenevaRegionalNews. Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ireland at rireland@lakegenevanews.net.

Mary O'Connor (Director of Marketing) The Mill Creek Hotel

The Mill Creek Hotel 123 Center Street Lake Geneva, WI 53147 877.MCH.LGWI www.millcreekhotel.com

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6B

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

WALWORTH COUNTY COURT

Woman gets jail, probation in family theft case By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net ELKHORN — Kimberly L. Doran agreed to care for her elderly father and removed him from a “dump” of a nursing home. However, when her dad was in her care, she stole $35,000 from his IRA account. “This was a serious betrayal of trust,” Judge David Reddy said after sentencing the 47-year-old woman to three years of probation, which was the maximum probation term allowed. As a condition of her probation, Reddy stayed and imposed all but 15 days of a sixmonth jail sentence. This means Doran must serve 15 days in jail, and, at her probation agent’s discretion could serve the remanding 5 1/2 months. Sometime around April 2010, Doran became her father’s power of attorney,

according to court documents. a deterrent to other potential Doran made three withdrawals offenders. from her father’s IRA account, “We are seeing more and more which totaled $35,000. Because cases of people stealing money the withdrawals came from an IRA from family and close friends,” account the victim incurred addiDonohoo said. “If you steal from tional costs for fees and tax penalvulnerable people, like the elderly ties. He also lost potential income or infirm, there will be punishon interest that the account would ment.” have generated. Dade said the victim, Doran Doran’s attorney John Dade and Doran’s husband all resided Doran and Assistant District Attorney in the same home in Bloomfield Diane Donohoo agreed to a restiTownship. He said some of the tution amount before the hearing. money went to cover shared household The amount of restitution is $40,000 expenses. if Doran pays her father $5,000 within the “She was the main person taking care next 90 days. of him,” Dade said. However, if she doesn’t, the amount of Dade’s comment drew laughs of disberestitution raises to $45,000. lief from the victim and two of his friends. Donohoo asked Reddy to sentence “She was in essence a 24/7 in-home Doran to probation, but asked him to nurse, who was helping (the victim),” Dade include conditional jail time to serve as said.

Dade said a mitigating factor in the case is that Doran provided her father some care without receiving compensation. “To that I say, ‘That’s what a good daughter does,’” Reddy said. Dade asked Reddy to sentence his client to probation, but not to include jail time. Dade compared Doran’s case to the cases of Johnalee Kawalec and Deborah Hutter. Both women were convicted of theft, and both received probation without conditional jail time. Unlike Doran’s case, Kawalec took her case to jury trial and was convicted. “Mrs. Donohoo said she asked for jail in those cases, but she didn’t get it, and neither should Mrs. Doran,” Dade said. Reddy wasn’t the judge in either the Kawalec or the Hutter cases, and he said he wasn’t familiar with either case. As a judge, he said it isn’t appropriate for him to compare the cases.

Judge adds 10 years to DNA links Delavan man to three area burglaries pedophile’s prison stay A 57-year-old Whitewater man Rintala had touched him in a was sentenced to another 10 years sexual manner. in prison for sexually assaulting a He said these assaults occurred 12-year-old boy. at the defendant’s home in JefferDennis P. Rintala, 755 N. Tratt son County and near a railroad St., No. 99, pleaded guilty to a track in Rock County. felony charge of repeated sexual In Walworth County, the assault of a child. youngster said that Rintala Judge David Reddy also sentouched him in a sexual manner tenced Rintala Aug. 15 to 10 years while parked outside of a church. of extended supervision. Rintala’s On Aug. 6, Rintala was interRintala sentence runs consecutive to a 10viewed by a police officer, and he year prison sentence in Jefferson admitted to touching the boy in a County, which means Rintala will serve a sexual manner multiple times. total of 20 years behind bars. He told police he met the boy at a According to the criminal complaint: church. Rintala also allegedly told police On Aug. 6, the alleged victim spoke to “it’s the flesh” and “that is the way of sin, is a forensic interviewer and disclosed that it’s enticing.”

Using DNA evidence, police linked a convicted burglar to three burglaries that occurred in 2010 and 2011. Anthony J. Chiapusio, 25, 5113 Highway 50, Delavan, has been charged with two counts of burglary and one count of burglary while arming himself with a dangerous weapon. If convicted, Chiapusio faces more than 40 years imprisonment. In 2012, Chiapusio was convicted of three counts of felony burglary, one count of burglary while arming himself with a dangerous weapon and one count of fleeing. Chiapusio was sentenced to five years of probation and ordered to serve one year in the county jail with work-release privileges. Chiapusio is free from custody on a signature bond. According to the criminal complaint:

On Jan. 23, 2010, police investigated a burglary in the town of Darien. On the scene, police found a cigarette butt that didn’t belong to the owners. On Oct. 26, 2011, a town of Whitewater home was burglarized. A television and a blue ray player had been reported stolen. An alcohol bottle was found on the scene, which police collected as evidence. On Aug. 26, 2011, police investigated a burglary in the town of Linn. The homeowner reported that three televisions, a bow, arrows and other items had been stolen. It was apparent in the home that someone had used the restroom, and police collected a DNA sample from the bathroom. The state crime lab reviewed the three DNA samples, and the samples matched Chiapusio’s DNA.

COURT REPORTS Charges dismissed against Williams Bay man Criminal charges have been dismissed against a 23-year-old Williams Bay man who was accused of illegally killing a deer in the village of Fontana. Brent R. Holmes had been charged with illegal hunting. If convicted he faced between $1,000 and $2,000 in fines and up to six months imprisonment.

Elmhurst man allegedly hurt cop An Elmhurst, Ill., man is accused of hurting a Fontana police officer on July 28 as he resisted arrest. Michael C. Cellini, 27, faces a felony charge of resisting an officer causing an injury. If convicted of the felony, Cellini faces up to six years imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. He also faces misdemeanor charges of resisting an officer and disorderly conduct. According to the criminal complaint: Police responded to the Abbey Resort for a noise and marijuana complaint. When responding to the call, the officer saw a group of men walking toward him, and the officer could smell marijuana on three of the men. The officer asked the men to stop. Two topped, but Cellini, ran. When the officer attempted to bring Cellini to the ground, Cellini resisted and the officer’s shoulder was dislocated. Cellini was able to run away from the officer. Police went to Cellini’s room at the

resort, and he again ran away from police. The second time police went to Cellini’s room they were able to arrest him. After suffering the shoulder injury, the officer was unable to return to work.

Bloomfield man faces drug charge A 28-year-old Bloomfield man was arrested July 25 for allegedly possessing heroin. Timothy D. Malugen, N933 Rose Drive, has been charged with possession of a narcotic drug, as a second and subsequent offense. If convicted, he faces up to 7 1/2 years imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of possession of drug paraphernalia. According to the criminal complaint: Police responded to a Lake Geneva residence for a report of an overdose. Malugen was found not breathing and unresponsive. Malugen was revived with a shot of Narcan. Heroin was discovered in his pocket. On Feb. 15, Malugen pleaded guilty to possession of a narcotic drug and was sentenced to two years of probation.

Man accused of assaulting girl A 33-year-old rural Sharon man is accused of sexually assaulting a 15-year-old girl. Ryan M. Zimmerman, W7897 Town Hall Road, has been charged with repeated sexual assault of a child. If convicted, Zimmerman faces up to 40 years imprisonment and $100,000 in fines. According to the criminal complaint:

The victim reported to police on Aug. 5 that Zimmerman had assaulted her.

Man faces identity theft charge A 35-year-old Lake Geneva man is accused of stealing a wallet from a woman’s vehicle and using a credit card he found in it. Shawn M. Johnson, 3155 County Highway H, has been charged with identity theft, financial gain. If convicted, he faces up to six years imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. According to the criminal complaint: On July 22, a woman reported that her wallet, which contained credit cards, was stolen from her vehicle. A credit card was used at the gas station, and police spoke to the owner about the transaction. The owner called police later that day to report that the man who attempted to use the stolen credit card had returned to the gas station. Police arrived and arrested the man, who was identified as Johnson.

Third suspect faces charges in saddle thefts A third person has been charged in connection with saddle thefts that occurred at an area horse ranch in December 2012. . Joshua G. Tracy, 30, 418 Beloit St., Apt. 6, faces one count of felony burglary, eight counts of misdemeanor theft and one count of misdemeanor obstructing an officer. If convicted of the burglary charge, Tracy faces up to 12 1/2 years imprisonment

and $25,000 in fines. Each theft charge carries a maximum penalty of nine months imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. Michael Southworth, 21, Pell Lake, and Shawn M. Mercier, 25, Franklin, both also face charges in connection with the burglary and are awaiting trial. Southworth also face charges related to a separate burglary at Fantasy Hills Ranch in the town of Delavan. According to the criminal complaint: On Dec. 28, police received a report of saddles that were stolen from a property on Bowers Road in the town of LaFayette. The two saddles that were stolen were valued at $3,200. Another saddle theft was reported on Dec. 31 at the Dawson Creek Ranch on Bowers Road. The owner reported about 10 saddles were stolen. On Dec. 31, a Dodge County Sheriff’s deputy received a report of three people who planned to sell about 10 saddles to a person in Dodge County. Southworth, Mercier and Ingersoll arrived at the property to sell the saddles and were questioned by police. On Jan. 1, police questioned Mercier who said he was involved in the Fantasy Hills burglary with Southworth and Jasmine Ingersoll, 21, Lyons. Ingersoll faces a felony charge of receiving stolen property. When questioned by police, Southworth admitted to stealing the saddles with Mercier and Tracy. When police questioned Tracy, he initially said he wasn’t involved with the theft and was at home that evening. However, cell phone records show that he used his phone in the area of the theft.

BLOOMFIELD POLICE REPORTS Bloomfield police recently reported the following incidents, with personal contact information redacted from the reports. n A motorist was injured in a twovehicle crash July 11 at 10:36 a.m. on Pell Lake Drive, near the Highway 12 on-ramp. The motorist was driving east on Pell Lake Drive and stopped to turn north onto Highway 12. A female motorist, also traveling east on Pell Lake Drive, told police she “was not paying attention” and rear-ended the other vehicle. She was cited for inattentive driving. Both vehicles sustained moderate damage. n Three male subjects were cited for disorderly conduct after an incident July 21 at 12:05 a.m. at Chris’ Steel Horse Saloon, W1126 N. Lake Shore Drive. According to the report, the subjects entered the saloon intoxicated and the owner refused to serve them alcohol. Two “younger males,” the report states,

did not have ID and “were trying to start a fight with other patrons.” n A female subject was cited for theft after $40 was reported stolen July 19 at 10:14 a.m. n Police are investigating the theft of asphalt from the end of a driveway on Washington Avenue. The theft, which was reported by the Bloomfield Highway Department, is believed to have occurred between July 15 at 3 p.m. and July 16 at 8 a.m. n Police are investigating the theft of a Samsung Galaxy 3 cell phone reported July 8 at 12:59 p.m. The phone is estimated to be worth $350. n Police reported a “property damage only” accident July 16 at 6:36 a.m. at N1762 Daisy Drive. The accident involved two vehicles. Further information was not reported. n Someone cut a 3-inch hole into the right front tire of a Snapper lawn mower

between July 13 at 12:59 p.m. and July 16 at 10:34 a.m. The lawn mower was at a Chicago Drive residence.

n Police are investigating a theft reported July 21 at 1:10 p.m. on Circle Drive. Further information was not reported.

Keeping you current since 1872

315 Broad Street, Lake Geneva, WI 262-248-4444


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

7B

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 2013PR144 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Terry H. Eisenbach Deceased PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for inforaml administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth August 10, 1942 and date of death March 1, 2012, was domiciled in Walworth County7, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of W4052 Whittier Rd., Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent5’s estate is November 29, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Judicial Center-Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 Countty Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085, 531211001. Elizabeth Cheverie Deputy Probate Registrar August 22, 2013 Tammy S. Schiesl 1624 Richter Dr. Batavia, IL 60510 630-482-9357 Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, 2013

the name of the person listed above from Tyler Allan Kalous to Tyler Alan Turner. Birth Certificate: Tyler Allan Kalous. IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of Wisconsin before the Hon. Phillip A. Koss, Judge at the Walworth Co. Judicial Center, 1800 County Road NN, Elkhorn, WI 53121 on September 30, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 262-741-7012 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide tranportation. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News, a newspaper published in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin. BY THE COURT: Hon Phillip A. Koss Circuit Court Judge Aug. 9, 2013 Aug. 22, 29 & Sept. 5, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT CIVIL DIVISION WALWORTH COUNTY Case No. 13 CV 00023 Case Code No. 30404 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE3, ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WFHE3 Plaintiff Vs. TAMMY S. ASKIN A/K/A TAMMY ASKIN; Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 14, 2013, in the amount of $141,913.49, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 19, 2013 at 10:00 am TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 Property description: LOTS “O”, 1, 2 AND THE NORTH 25 FEET OF LOT 3 ALL IN PARCEL LETTERED “A” OF THE PLAT OF MAPLE HURST, LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, IN TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 16 EAST, IN THE TOWN OF DELAVAN, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN. Tax Key No.: FMH 00001A & FMH 00001 Property Address: 4325 MEADOWLARK AVE., DELAVAN, WISCONSIN 53115 Lauren L. Tobiason State Bar No. 1092310 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. August 22, 29, & September 5, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Amended Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 2013PR123 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE W. SALUS A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 1. The decedent, with date of birth August 17, 1930 and date of death July 4, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of N3130 Tamarack Road, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 13, 2013. 2. A claim must be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. BY THE COURT: Kristina M., Secord Circuit Court Commissioner August 9, 2013 Nicholas A. Egert McCormack & Egert, S.C. 835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-6600 Bar Number; 1056736 August 15, 22, 29, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 13CV00154 FIRST COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, v. HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C., ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI, DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI, UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3, 2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows:

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors for Summary Assignment (Formal Administration) Case No. 2013PR133 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA A. BOEKHAUS D/O/D: 05/07/13 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. A petition for summary assignment was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth 06/14/1933 and date of death 05/07/2013 was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin with a mailing address of 92 Sterling Parkway, Genoa City, WI 53128 3. The right of a creditor to bring an action terminates three months after the date of publication of this order. Creditors may bring an action by A. filing a claim in the Walworth County Circuit Court before the property is assigned. B. bringing a suit against the assignee(s) after the property is assigned. 4. The property may be assigned to the creditors and interested persons after 30 days have elapsed following the publication of this notice. BY THE COURT: Sheila T. Reiff Circuit Court Commissioner August 2, 2013 Daniel S. Draper PO Box 940 716 Wisconsin Street Lake Geneva, WI 53147 (262) 248-6636 Bar Number: 1031580 Aug. 15, 22, 29, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, WALWORTH COUNTY Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 2013PR140 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER L. BOWLER, A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 1. The decedent, with date of birth December 7, 1973 and date of death July 28, 2011, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1425 Conant Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 22, 2013. 2. A claim must be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001 County Courthouse, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. BY THE COURT: Dela Race Circuit Court Commissioner August 15, 2013 Nicholas A. Egert McCormack & Egert, S.C. 835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-6600 Bar No. 1056736 Aug. 22, 29, & Sept. 5, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 13CV00746 In the matter of the name change of: TYLER ALLAN KALOUS By (Petitioner) Amanda Jane Turner By (Co-Petitioner) Jaime Alan Serna NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Amended Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing claims (Informal Administration) Case No. 13PR113 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALBERT HINZPETER D.O.D. 4-25-2013 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth June 13, 1923 and date of death April 25, 2013 was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 898 Sauganash Drive, Fontana, WI 53125. 3. The application will be heard at the Walworth County Probate, 1800 County Road NN-Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085, before Sheila T. Reiff, Probate Registrar, on July 30, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may be granted if there is no objection. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 6, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. 6. This publication is notice to any persons whose names or address are unknown. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 262-741-7014 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. Please check with person named below for exact time and date. Wendy A. Esch Deputy Probate Registrar July 29, 2013 Attorney Lindsey M. White 1624 Hobbs Drive Delavan, WI 53115 262-740-1971 Bar Number: 1088716 August 15, 22, 29, 2013

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SUBSCRIBE NOW BEFORE PRICES GO UP! Due to increasing postal rates and printing costs, The Lake Geneva Regional News will raise its subscription rates in the near future. Get your yearly subscription today while rates are still low! One Year Subscription Walworth County: $45.00 Wisconsin: $45.00 Illinois: $58.00 All Other Locations: $65.00

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 13CV00154 FIRST COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, v. HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C., ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI, DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI, UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3, 2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 12 CV 01000 Case Code No. 30404 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, INC. 2006-HE3, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-HE3 Plaintiff Vs. STEVEN FIENE; JENNIFER L. HERNANDEZ; ALLISON FIENE; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR PREMIER MORTGAGE FUNDING; Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 14, 2013, in the amount of $138,315.67, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 26, 2013 at 10:00 am TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 Property description: LOT THREE (3) IN BLOCK TWO (2) IN PASSAGE, ARAM & DOWNIE’S ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE (NOW CITY) OF DELAVAN, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN. Tax Key No.: XP 00019 Property Address: 211 S. 4TH ST., DELAVAN, WISCONSIN 53115 Kimberly W. Hibbard State Bar No. 1090800 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9711 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, 2013

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TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances and subject to tenant’s rights, if any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording fees and costs of any title evidence. PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co. Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Unit 5, together with said unit’s undivided percentage interest in the common elements (and the exclusive use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said unit) all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849, and First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, and Second Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152 said condominium being located in the City of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on the real estate described in said Declaration and incorporated herein by this reference thereto. Tax Key No. ZUN 00005 Property Address: Generally Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 DATED: August 7, 2013 Attorney Edward F. Thompson State Bar No. 1013187 CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. 617 E. Walworth Ave. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115-0445 Phone: (262) 728-9196 Facsimile: (262) 728-1012 E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com www.clairlawoffices.com Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. August 15, 22, 29, 2013

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315 Broad St. • P.O. Box 937 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262.248.4444 • www.lakegenevanews.net

1 year

LEGAL NOTICES

BY 12 P.M. MONDAY

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TO APPEAR IN THE UPCOMING ISSUE For more information contact Sue

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Please include payment with subscriber information. The Regional News accepts Visa, Discover, Mastercard, check & cash.

TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances and subject to tenant’s rights, if any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording fees and costs of any title evidence. PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co. Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 1: Units 6 and 7, together with said unit’s undivided percentage interest in the common elements (and the exclusive use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said unit) all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849, and First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, and Second Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152 said condominium being located in the City of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on the real estate described in said Declaration and incorporated herein by this reference thereto. Tax Key Nos. ZUN 00006 and ZUN 00007 Property Address: Generally Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 PARCEL 2: A part of Lots 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 of Lake Geneva Business Park, a subdivision being located in part of Southeast ¼ of the Northwest ¼, the Southwest ¼, of the Northeast ¼, the Northwest ¼ of the Southeast ¼, the Northeast ¼ of the Southeast ¼, and the Southwest ¼ of the Southeast ¼ of Section 31, Town 2 North, Range 18 East, City of Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 15; thence along the West line of said Lot 15, N 35DEG 05MIN 23SEC W, 215.00 feet; thence N 54DEG 54MIN 33SEC E, 136.68 feet; thence N 35DEG 05MIN 24SEC W, 251.90 feet to the Southerly right of way line of Geneva Parkway; thence along said right of way line, 104.22 feet along the arc of a curve to the right with a radius of 954.00 feet and a chord which bears N 71DEG 09MIN 50SEC E, 104.22 feet to an iron pipe stake; thence S 35DEG 05MIN 24SEC E, 437.75 feet to an iron pipe stake; thence S 54DEG 54MIN 33SEC W, 236.68 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849, and First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, and Second Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152. Tax Key Nos.: ZUN 00007A and ZUN 00007B

MUST BE PLACED

Name: Address: City: State: Telephone: Email:

TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.

phone: 262-248-4444 fax: 262-248-4476 email: sue@lakegenevanews.net

Property Address: Generally Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 DATED: August 7, 2013 Attorney Edward F. Thompson State Bar No. 1013187 CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. 617 E. Walworth Ave. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115-0445 Phone: (262) 728-9196 Facsimile: (262) 728-1012 E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com www.clairlawoffices.com Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. August 15, 22, 29, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 13CV00154 FIRST COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, v. HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C., ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI, DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI, UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3, 2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances and subject to tenant’s rights, if any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording fees and costs of any title evidence. PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co. Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Unit 1, together with said unit’s undivided percentage interest in the common elements (and the exclusive use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said unit) all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849, and First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, and Second Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, said condominium being located in the City of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on the real estate described in said Declaration and incorporated herein by this reference thereto. Tax Key No.: ZUN 00001 Property Address: Generally Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 DATED: August 7, 2013 Attorney Edward F. Thompson State Bar No. 1013187 CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. 617 E. Walworth Ave. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115-0445 Phone: (262) 728-9196 Facsimile: (262) 728-1012 E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com www.clairlawoffices.com Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. August 15, 22, 29, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Amended Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 13CV639 In the matter of the name change of: WILLIAM CARTER BOWMAN-GOES By (Petitioner) Eric Leonard Goes By (Co-Petitioner) Jenna Mae Bowman NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above from William Carter Bowman-Goes to William Carter Goes. Birth Certificate: William Carter Bowman-Goes IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of Wisconsin before the Hon. Phillip A. Koss, Judge at the Walworth Co. Judicial Center,

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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

WILLIAMS BAY PUBLIC NOTICES

LAKE GENEVA PUBLIC NOTICES

SCHOOL BOARD MEETING

SCHOOL BOARD MEETING

the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances and subject to tenant’s rights, if any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording fees and costs of any title evidence.

NOTICE OF THE OPEN BOOK AND BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY Pursuant to Sec. 70.45 of Wis. Statutes the assessment roll for the YEAR 2013 assessment will be open for examination (Open Book) on Saturday, August 3, 2013 and September 7, 2013 at the Village Hall. Instructional material about the assessment and Board of Review procedures will be available at that time for information on how to file an objection and the Board of Review procedures under Wisconsin law. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Village of Williams Bay of Walworth County shall hold a meeting on September 23, 2013 at the Village Hall, 250 Williams Street. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board or by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor of the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Village of Williams Bay has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. August 28, 2013

objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 23rd day of August 2013. Mayor James R. Connors City Plan Commission City of Lake Geneva, WI

REGULAR MEETING BOARD OF EDUCATION LAKE GENEVA JOINT #1 SCHOOL DISTRICT 5:30 P.M. TUESDAY, JULY 9, 2013 DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION Roll call: Present: Spiegelhoff, Franzene, Dinan, Dale, Hollmann Also Present: Gottinger, Flitcroft, Eckola, Jaeger, Halbesma, Schroeder, Syens, Schmidt, Nugent, Tennessen, Sarna, News Media President Spiegelhoff called the meeting to order 5:30 p.m. followed by the pledge of allegiance. A motion was made by Dale, seconded by Hollmann to convene in open session. All yes. Motion carried. A motion was made by Franzene, seconded by Hollmann to approve the agenda as written. All yes. Motion carried. A motion was made by Franzene, seconded by Hollmann to approve the minutes of the Regular Meeting & Executive Session June 11, 2013 5:30 p.m. All yes. Motion carried. A motion was made by Franzene, seconded by Hollmann to approve the payment of bills totaling $1,036,267.42. Roll call: Yes – Franzene, Hollmann, Dinan, Spiegelhoff, Dale. All yes. Motion carried. Central Denison Principal Betsy Schroeder reported on the summer curriculum work with staff, preparation for the Jump Start program and the hours for the school library at Central Denison. Dr. Schroeder thanked the custodial staff for their work with the staff transition to Eastview and Central Denison and for their work to prepare the building for the new school year. Central Denison Asst. Principal Jackey Syens reported on the refiguring of the staff iPads and shared that a team of teachers will meet July 15th to work on technology curriculum. LGMS Assistant Principal Colin Nugent reported on the many summer enrichment course offerings at LGMS and thanked the custodial staff for their efforts as the building has been a very busy. Eastview Principal Drew Halbesma reported on construction progress and the many hours of curriculum work his staff has completed this summer. Star Center Principal Chiper Tennessen reported on the Jump Start program and preparation for the August 5th start date. Mrs. Tennessen thanked the Star custodial staff for their hard work this summer as well. Director of Curriculum and Instruction Dr. Jan Eckola referred to her monthly report for any questions. Staff has been working throughout the summer months on curriculum and classroom preparation for the new school year. Director of Student Services Donna Jaeger referred to the annual nurse’s report for any questions. Open enrollment numbers will be provided in August. Discussion took place regarding the Annual Exam Compliance Form for staff members. Director of Technology Dan Schmidt reported on technology switches, new devices being purchased, copier changes and upgrades, central copying and preparation for the new school year. Discussion took place regarding the new technology curriculum for 4K-5th grade. Superintendent James Gottinger referred to his monthly handouts. Discussion took place regarding the evaluation tool and the Effective Educator model. Dr. Gottinger shared information from the Mission of Mercy event held at Badger on June 28-29, 2013. Over 2000 area patients

were seen by dental professionals from throughout the state. The organization was very pleased with our facility and thanked the districts and police support for their efforts. Next years event will be held in Green Bay. The Board of Education will schedule a tour of Eastview’s construction progress prior to the August meeting and at the regular meeting will set a date for goal setting for the 2013-2014 school year. A motion was made by Dale, seconded by Franzene to approve the resignation of Cecelia Blenker – Art 75% and new hires Edwin Scherzer – LGMS Aide and Rona Coltman – Art 75%. All yes. Motion carried. A motion was made by Franzene, seconded by Hollmann to approve the CESA 2 contract in the amount of $6,059. All yes. Motion carried. The Board of Education asked that discussion take place at a future meeting regarding overnight and field trip procedure. A motion was made by Franzene, seconded by Hollmann to adjourn. All yes. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned at 6:16 p.m. 8-13-13 Date Approved Marcie Hollmann, Clerk August 29, 2013

Continued from page 6 1800 County Road NN, Branch 2, Elkhorn, WI 53121 on September 30, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 262-741-7012 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide tranportation. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News, a newspaper published in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin. BY THE COURT: Hon Phillip A. Koss Circuit Court Judge Aug. 10, 2013 Aug. 22, 29 & Sept. 5, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO REISSUE A WISCONSIN POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (WPDES) PERMIT No.WI-0029327-09-0 Permittee: Grand Geneva Resort & Spa, 7036 Grand Geneva Way, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Facility Where Discharge Occurs: Grand Geneva Resort & Spa, Sheridan Springs Rd., Lake Geneva, WI Receiving Water and Location: A wetland adjacent to Como Creek and the White River, Southeastern Fox River Basin, Walworth County Brief Facility Description and Summary of Proposed Changes: The Grand Geneva Resort & Spa wastewater treatment facility, located at Sheridan Springs Road, Lake Geneva, consists of two activated sludge package treatment plants with capacities 0.40 MGD and 0.10 MGD. The 0.40 MGD plant is used for treatment and the 0.10 MGD (previously also used for treatment) is now used for sludge digestion/storage. Wastewater flows into the comminutor and into the 0.40 MGD package plant, where it undergoes aeration, clarification, and sludge digestion. Clarifier effluent flows into a contact tank and is monitored at the V notch exit weir of the tank. Sludge is pumped from the aerobic digester into the 0.10 MGD tank for storage from where it is hauled away by Pat’s Sanitary once a year. The facility treats wastewater from the Grand Geneva Resort and also accepts holding tank waste from Pat’s Sanitary. The plant is currently operating at about 30% of its design flow and 28% of its design organic loading. Permit Drafter: Dale Rezabek, DNR, SER Headquarters, 2300 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212, (414) 263-8651, dale.rezabek@wisconsin.gov Basin Engineer: Song Tran, DNR, 2300 N. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53212, (414) 263-8674, Song.Tran@Wisconsin.gov The Department has tentatively decided that the above specified WPDES permit should be reissued. Persons wishing to comment on or object to the proposed permit action, or to request a public hearing, may write to the Department of Natural Resources at the permit drafter’s address. All comments or suggestions received no later than 30 days after the publication date of this public notice will be considered along with other information on file in making a final decision regarding the permit. Anyone providing comments in response to this public notice will receive a notification of the Department’s final decision when the permit is issued. Where designated as a reviewable surface water discharge permit, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is allowed up to 90 days to submit comments or objections regarding this permit determination. If no comments are received on the proposed permit from anyone, including U.S. EPA, the permit will be issued as proposed. The Department may schedule a public informational hearing if requested by any person and shall schedule a public informational hearing if a petition requesting a hearing is received from 5 or more persons or if response to this notice indicates significant public interest pursuant to s. 283.49, Stats. Requests for a public informational hearing shall state the following: the name and address of the person(s) requesting the hearing; the interest in the proposed permit of the person(s) requesting the hearing; the reasons for the request; and the issues proposed to be considered at the hearing. Information on file for this permit action, including the draft permit, fact sheet (if required), and permit application, may be inspected and copied at the permit drafter’s and basin engineer’s office, Monday through Friday (except holidays), between 9:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Please call the permit drafter or basin engineer for directions to their office location, if necessary. Information on this permit action may also be obtained by calling the permit drafter at (414) 263-8651 or by writing to the Department. Reasonable costs (usually 20 cents per page) will be charged for copies of information in the file other than the public notice and fact sheet. Permit information is also available on the internet at: http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wastewater/PublicNot ices.html. Pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation, including the provision of informational material in an alternative format, will be made to qualified individuals upon request. August 29, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 13CV00154 FIRST COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, v. HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C., ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI, DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI, UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3, 2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to

PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co. Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Unit 2, together with said unit’s undivided percentage interest in the common elements (and the exclusive use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said unit) all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849, and First Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, and Second Amendment to Declaration of Condominium Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152, said condominium being located in the City of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on the real estate described in said Declaration and incorporated herein by this reference thereto. Tax Key No.: ZUN 00002 Property Address: Generally Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 DATED: August 7, 2013 Attorney Edward F. Thompson State Bar No. 1013187 CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. 617 E. Walworth Ave. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115-0445 Phone: (262) 728-9196 Facsimile: (262) 728-1012 E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com www.clairlawoffices.com Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. August 15, 22, 29, 2013

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TOWN OF LINN NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Linn Town Board will accept sealed bids until 11:00 AM on Thursday, September 12, 2013, W3728 Franklin Walsh Drive, PO Box 130, Zenda, WI 53195 for the following projects: 1. Re-roof one of the highway department buildings located at the Town Complex, W3728 Franklin Walsh Drive 2. Installation of a generator at the Town Complex, W3728 Franklin Walsh Street The Town Board reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids and accept the bid most advantageous to the Town, even if that bid is not submitted as the lowest responsible bidder. Call Chris Jones, 262-248-8367 for bid information and “specs”. Mail bid to Town of Linn, PO Box 130, Zenda, WI 53195 marked “Roof Bid” or “Generator Bid” Sue Polyock, CMC/WCMC Clerk/Treasurer Aug. 29 & Sept. 5, 2013

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WILLIAMS BAY PUBLIC NOTICES OFFICIAL PUBLICATION VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that there will be a Public Hearing on Monday, September 9, 2013 at 6:30pm at the Village Hall located at 250 Williams Street to consider the following:

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GENOA CITY PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held on Thursday, Sept. 12th, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at Village Hall, 715 Walworth St. before the Planning Commission of the Village of Genoa City, Wisconsin on Conditional Use Permit Application under 310-53 filed by Joseph and Kym Mack proposed use of structure on site in detail for Barn/Hay storage pre-fab building with a height of at least 17’ and may be permitted as a conditional use on the following described property: 525 Freeman St; TVGC00031 Zoning: R-1; Single Family Residential District All interested parties in the above matter are invited to attend. The Village Planning Commission will be in session on Thursday, Sept. 12th, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. at the Village Hall, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa City, Wisconsin to consider any objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 29th day of August, 2013. Bill Antti, Chairperson, Village Planning Commission Aug. 29, 2013

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Recommendations from the Central Business Re-development Committee Report All persons, and their agents or attorneys will be given an opportunity to be heard in relation thereto. Jacqueline Hopkins Village Clerk August 29, 2013

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CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE 11 A.M. FRIDAY

contact Sue at 262-248-4444 sue@lakegenevanews.net

LAKE GENEVA PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the City Plan Commission on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, regarding the sale of City property and vacation of a portion of the roadway located on La Salle street near the intersection of Edgewood Drive, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. This property is adjacent to Tax Key Number ZEH 00038. All interested in the above matter are invited to attend. The City Plan Commission will be in session on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to consider any

A QUORUM OF ALDERMEN MAY BE IN ATTENDANCE Aug. 29 & Sept. 5

WNAXLP

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the City Plan Commission on Monday, September 16, 2013, at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, for a zoning map amendment to assign standard zoning district designation on an expired Planned Development at the following location: ZSUM 00101 to ZSUM 002472 (formerly ZOP 00412A), Summerhaven, from PD (Planned Development) to TR-6 (Two family Residential). All interested in the above matter are invited to attend. The City Plan Commission will be in session on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to consider any comments that may have been filed and to hear from all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 23rd day of August 2013. Mayor James R. Connors City Plan Commission City of Lake Geneva, WI A QUORUM OF ALDERMEN MAY BE IN ATTENDANCE Aug. 13 & Sept. 16, 2013

WNAXLP

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the City Plan Commission on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, on a Conditional Use Application filed by Gonzalo and Pat Davila, 1155 S. Lake Shore Drive, Lake Geneva, WI 53147, for the installation of a decorative fence in excess of three feet in the streetyard on Maple Street at the following location: TAX KEY NO. ZLG 00001 – 1155 S LAKE SHORE DRIVE All interested in the above matter are invited to attend. The City Plan Commission will be in session on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to consider any objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 23rd day of August 2013. Mayor James R. Connors City Plan Commission City of Lake Geneva, WI A QUORUM OF ALDERMEN MAY BE IN ATTENDANCE Aug. 29 & Sept. 5, 2013

WNAXLP

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the City Plan Commission on Monday, September 16, 2013, at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, on a Conditional Use Application filed by Lake Geneva Architects, Jason Bernard, on behalf of Andrew Kerwin, 1616 Evergreen Lane, Lake Geneva, WI 53147, for a second floor addition (cupola) to an existing single family residence in the ER-1 District using the setback requirements of the SR-4 District at the following location: TAX KEY NO. ZLM 000131616 EVERGREEN LANE All interested in the above matter are invited to attend. The City Plan Commission will be in session on Monday, September 16, 2016, at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to consider any objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 23rd day of August, 2013. Mayor James R. Connors City Plan Commission City of Lake Geneva, WI A QUORUM OF ALDERMEN MAY BE IN ATTENDANCE Aug. 29 & Sept 5, 2013

WNAXLP

LEGAL NOTICES MUST BE PLACED BY 12 P.M. MONDAY

TO APPEAR IN THE

UPCOMING ISSUE

contact Sue at 262-248-4444 sue@lakegenevanews.net

WNAXLP

REGULAR MEETING BOARD OF EDUCATION LAKE GENEVA - GENOA CITY UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 6:30 P.M. MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013 DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION CENTER Roll Call: Present: Sherman, Buntrock, Druszczak, Jacobson, Ceisel, Giovannetti (6:38 p.m.). Absent: Wolter Also Present: Gottinger, Flitcroft, Jaeger, Kopydlowski, Giovingo, Schmidt, Sarna President Sherman called the meeting to order at 6:30 p.m. followed by the pledge of allegiance. A motion was made by Buntrock, seconded by Ceisel to approve the agenda as written. All yes. Motion carried. A motion was made by Druszczak, seconded by Jacobson to approve payment of bills totaling $636,829.03 and the Regular Meeting and Executive Session-Monday, June 10, 2013 6:30 p.m. All yes. Motion carried. Discussion and a review of the board goals and Strategic Plan III took place. The Board of Education will schedule a work session at their August meeting to set goals for the upcoming new school year. A motion was made by Druszczak, seconded by Ceisel to approve the CESA 2 Contract in the amount of $2,985. All yes. Motion carried. Badger Principal Bob Kopydlowski and Assc. Principal Mike Giovingo reported on the Mission of Mercy event at Badger on June 28-29th.Over 2000 area residents were seen by dentists from throughout the state. The event went very smoothly with assistance from our own school staff and area police providing security. The MOM coordinators were very complimentary of our school and staff. The next event will take place in Green Bay next year. Summer school is underway with 147 students in attendance. The Board of Education requested that a three year comparison of truancy data be provided in August for their review and plans and preparation are underway for freshmen orientation. Director of Student Services Donna Jaeger referred to the annual nurse’s report for any questions. Discussion took place regarding the Peer Helpers group, school age parent program and open enrollment numbers will be provided in August. Discussion took place regarding the Annual Exam Compliance Form for staff members. Director of Technology Dan Schmidt reported on technology switches, new devices being purchased, copier changes and upgrades, central copying and preparation for the new school year. Superintendent James Gottinger referred to his monthly handouts. Discussion took place regarding the evaluation tool and the Effective Educator model. The hiring process is complete although August typically brings a possible resignation. Discussion took place regarding the summer hours for the physician’s assistant. A motion was made by Jacobson, seconded by Druszczak to adjourn. All yes. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned 7:15 p.m. 8-12-13 Date Approved Helen Jacobson, Clerk August 29, 2013

WNAXLP

TRAINING!!

TRAINING!!

TRAINING!! NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held before the City Plan Commission on Monday, September 16, 2013, at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, for a zoning map amendment to assign a standard zoning district designation on an expired Planned Development at the following location: ZWRI 00201-00308, Wrightwood Condominiums, from Planned Development (PD) to Multi-family (MR-8) all within the City of Lake Geneva. All interested in the above matter are invited to attend. The City Plan Commission will be in session on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 6:30 P.M. at the City Hall, Council Chambers, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, to consider any comments that may have been filed and to hear from all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 23rd day of August 2013. Mayor James R. Connors City Plan Commission City of Lake Geneva, WI A QUORUM OF ALDERMEN MAY BE IN ATTENDANCE Aug. 29 & Sept. 5, 2013

WNAXLP

The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business opportunity today. SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call (262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.

Schedule Coordinator Our busy dental office in the Lake Geneva area is currently seeking a full-time Schedule Coordinator. We are looking for a friendly and compassionate team player with excellent communication skills to assist with scheduling patient care, answering phones, and verifying insurance benefits for patients. Dental experience is preferred. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Please send resume to: Box GG c/o Lake Geneva Regional News P.O. Box 937 Lake Geneva, WI 53147


August 29, 2013

2

20

Classified SPECIALS

Drivers: Class A, Avg 2300 mi. wkly, all miles paid. Home every night, 5 day run, Drop/ Hook, TL, Assigned truck. Med, 401k, Paid – Life, disability, Holi, vac. Reefer exp. A-plus, 25yoa w/2yrs exp. 800-321-3460 x227

Help Wanted

AUTO TECHNICIAN

LEMAY SALES & SERVICE AS A KENOSHA NEWS SUBSCRIBER YOU HAVE ACCESS TO ALL ONLINE CONTENT AT KENOSHANEWS.COM FOR FREE! Call the Kenosha News Today! Customer Care Center 262-657-1500 and we’ll be glad to help you get registered. Ask about our Members Program for a few cents more you can receive your paper plus local retail offers and more!!

4

Community Announcements

Looking to hire full time, entry-level technician. Some auto experience is necessary. Competitive pay and insurance available. Apply in person (see Bob) at: 8220 75th St., Kenosha Job Site ID#1013191

Drivers: LOCAL & Line haul Milwaukee Openings! Great Pay & Benefits! CDL-A w/X & T, 1 yr. Exp. Req. (EOE/AA) Old Dominion Freight Line Call Jim Humbert: 1-800-529-1214 INSTALLATION/LABORER Must be experienced in, and have knowledge of, repair / maintenance / installation of lawn sprinkler systems. Resumes to: ppontillo@wisconsinlawnsprinkler.com or drop off 8 a.m. to 12:00 M/T/W at 4102 120th Avenue, Kenosha, WI Job Site ID#1013853

BARTENDER Professional bartender wanted. Should understand how to talk with guests, experience necessary, clean neat appearance and attention to detail. Please apply in person (Tues. - Thurs., between 1 to 4pm.) Ray Radigan’s Restaurant 11712 Sheridan Road, Kenosha WI Ph. 262-694-0455 Job Site ID#1013908

$$$$$$$$$ NEED EXTRA CASH?

DELIVERY ROUTES AVAILABLE NOW! KENOSHA NEWS is looking for route delivery INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS

SKYDIVE ON THE BEACH

DATABASE & NETWORK SPECIALIST

This opportunity will be available Aug 31-Sept 1 and each weekend during the month of Sept. Leave from Kenosha Airport and take scenic flight over Lake Front. Jump while attached to a certified instructor and enjoy your soft beach landing in front of your friends and family. Landing will be at Alford Park next to Carthage College! Reserve your slot at

Perform planning, development and upkeep of the District’s DBs, DB and file servers, and WAN. Bachelor’s degree in CS, IT or related field. At least 7 years progressively responsible experience, including application analysis and design, business systems analysis, project management, DB management, and design programming. Experience with Oracle, SQL, and Cisco desired. Apply in person or send resume to:

www.worldskydivingcenter.com

20

Help Wanted

North Shore Sanitary District P.O. Box 750 William Koepsel Drive Gurnee, IL 60031-0750 Fax: 847-623-6101 hrmail@northshoresanitary.org Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1014088

Our delivery crews are out early in the morning so they have the rest of the day open for another job / activities.

Help Wanted

SOCIAL MEDIA ASSISTANT –LAKE GENEVA $12/hr with performance increase – flexible part time hours plus telecommute. More info at: cdg7.net

SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN Perform functions to establish, monitor, and maintain an efficient and effective data (network infrastructure), hardware, software and voice communications environments. Provide resolution for problems with computer and telephone related equipment located in District facilities. AS in computer related field desired. 3 years technical experience, in computer operations, network connectivity, computer hardware, personal computers and peripherals. Valid Driver’s License required. Apply in person or send resume to: North Shore Sanitary District P.O. Box 750 William Koepsel Drive Gurnee, IL 60031-0750 Fax: 847-623-6101 hrmail@northshoresanitary.org Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1014092 TEACHER AND ASSISTANT Now taking applications for immediate Full or Part-Time positions Mon - Fri. We are looking for someone reliable, trustworthy, creative and who truly enjoys working with children and their families. Requirements include CPR/1st Aide and Registry certified. If you are that person, please apply at Kiddie Kare A’kademie, 9244 39th Ave., ask for Holly or Cory or email: kiddiekare@wi.rr.com Job Site ID#1014013

There may be routes available in your neighborhood! NORTH SIDE AND SOUTH SIDE ROUTES AVAILABLE!!

TRUCK DRIVER

Stop in to fill out an application at the CUSTOMER CARE CENTER FRONT LOBBY 5800 7th Avenue Kenosha, WI Job Site ID#1013307

Help Wanted

20

Help Wanted

Celebrating our 50th anniversary, Kenall has been a proud advocate for manufacturing in the U.S.A. and has become a champion in developing advanced lighting solutions for healthcare, high-abuse, transportation, food processing, sealed enclosure and security detention environments. ASSEMBLER (electrical) - 2nd shift Working in our safe and progressive manufacturing environment, this position is responsible for the assembly of Kenall’s lighting products. You will also perform testing, check work quality and identify and troubleshoot assembly performance problems. Requirements include: • Assembly experience (electrical wiring a plus) • Mechanical aptitude; ability to use most hand tools • Ability to read and understand blueprints, engineering drawings, work orders and written instruction • Good (English) communication skills WAREHOUSE GROUP LEADER-Temp to Perm, 2nd shift The Warehouse Group Leader will ensure the most effective utilization of available personnel while maintaining maximum efficiency and highest quality to achieve departmental objectives and goals and support management in identifying training requirements for department employees. • Prior supervisory or lead experience in manufacturing setting • Ability to give direction, manage follow up and supervise employees’ work • Extensive ERP, (EPICOR) knowledge as it relates to order picking and stocking requirements • Forklift certification, required • Good (English) communication skills SET-UP / OPERATORS (2nd shift) Press Brake: Amada HFB-FBD equipment. Must possess 2+ years experience on similar equipment, basic math and blueprint reading skills.

26 Service Directory DO YOU HAVE A PROPERTY WITH PIZZAZZ? Call Roger D. Johnson to get it SOLD! Real Estate Managing BROKER, AUCTIONEER MLS & Licensed WI, IL, MN, 608-385-8080 ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE Consultative Advertising Sales The Kenosha News is currently seeking an Advertising Account Representative. The successful candidate will be a fastpaced self-starter who enjoys taking charge of projects and delivering creative solutions to customers on a consistent basis. This individual will also be comfortable with cold calls, motivated to meet deadlines, exceed budget expectations and have the ability to close a sale. Experience in selling social media and digital websites is helpful. Local businesses look to the Kenosha News and their advertising representatives to grow their companies. If you thrive on a fast-paced environment where you can deliver value, we invite you to consider our select sales team. Our advertising team finds marketing solutions to fit the needs of clients by utilizing our printed publications and online products.

ROOFING — J&R Roofing. All types of roofing and exterior work done. Low prices and Senior discounts. Free estimates. Ph. 262-4555937.

• Education or work related experience with outside sales • Exceptional verbal and written communication skills • Good organizational skills and self-motivated work habits • Strategic thinking skills to find solutions for clients needs • Competent in continuous prospecting for new sales and face-to-face sales calls • Proficient in computers, software and a understanding of Digital Advertising • Ability to contribute to a total team success Base plus commissions If interested, please send your resume to: Kenosha News Human Resources 5800 7th Avenue Kenosha, WI 53140

DOLLS - Monster High, 13 characters, coffin/jewelry box, mirror bed, other accessoeries. $99 for all. Call/text 847-271-5260

GET ROOFED! All types of roofing & repairs. Free estimates. References 28 yrs exp. 262-764-0041

Pets, Supplies & Services

BUNNIES - 4 and 5 mo. old pedigreed minirex rabbits. Those shown @ Kenosha County Fair won blue ribbons. Asking $20, $25 with pedigree. Ph. 262-344-5210 PET CREMATION SERVICES Pets are family too! Cremation services for your pets. Kenosha Funeral Services & Crematory. Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.

TRANSCRIPTION SERVICE AVAILABLE — .90c/audio min. Memos, Letters, Sermons, 2p Interviews, Authors Please email me regarding your project i.transcribeit0@gmail.com

BEACH PARK—Estate Sale, tools, fishing, household items, clothes, etc. No early birds. Fri-Sat., 9am-5pm, Sun., 10am-4pm 10417 Talmadge Ave. GARAGE SALE at Scotty’s Service at 1238 Park Rd, PO Box 565, Pell Lake WI 53157 Big and small items, coats, tire changer, wheels with tires, Taking bids on 2001 BMW. Other autos for sale. Tires, many other items. Saturday-Monday 9-3. No early birds. 262279-3710

ZION—3 bedroom house, new kitchen & bath, clean, no pets. $1075 plus security. Ph. 920-487-8080.

88 Business/ Commercial Rentals

STEEL BUILDING — At my Union Grove, WI home. Suitable for boat, motorhome, camper or car. Call 262-497-6176.

94

84 Residential Rentals

Vacation Rentals

LAKE GENEVA TOWNHOME at Grand Geneva Resort & Spa. 2 BD 1.5 BA Furnished rental. Enjoy all amenities of the resort. Oct 1 through May or short term.$775 mo + sec. 847-502-4567

1 & 2 BRs STARTING AT $675 www.professionalrealty.biz 262-942-8399 — Pet Friendly

1 & 2 BEDROOMS

112 Manufactured Home Sale/Rent

2524 - 18TH STREET $670 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED! 262-551-7255

BEACH PARK—-For sale, 3BR, 2 bath, sunken living room, large shed. Ph. 224-730-1623

CALL FOR SUMMER SPECIAL Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail 1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT 1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140 www.petrettiapartments.com

114 Motorcycles

1 BEDROOM from $560 2 BEDROOM from $670 GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING AND HOT WATER INCLUDED 262-552-8365 WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt. http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek

HARLEY — 2003 Harley, 100th Anniversary. Springer Softtail. 1,658 miles. Black. Partial trade considered. Call 262-694-7592.

10 NAZ MOTEL Effeciency apartment, Free HBO & WI-FI, Kitchenettes, Low Weekly & Daily Rates 847-746-1400

120 Automobiles

KAWASAKI 1992 1500 VULCAN 88 $1795 — Runs, drives, needs minor work. Ph. 262-3088147.

1004 HARBOR MOTEL Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet, phone, refrigerator & microwave, Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly rates. 847-872-5400 1128 ABODE MOTEL Sleeping rooms, Kitchenettes, Free wi-fi, Cable TV. Low Daily/Weekly Rates 847-872-3476

‘04 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 62k, new tires, battery, leather. Remote start. Grandma kept. $5,500. 262-215-6634 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 1978 Pace car, 14,600 miles, asking $15,800. Racine 262632-9726 or 262-308-4067 HONDA 2004 ACCORD V6; 103K miles; Excellent condition. Ph. 262-705-3248 KIA RIO 2003 $3200 — 4 door, 4 cylinder, auto, cold AC, 30 mpg, runs & looks excellent, 262-945-0248

121 Vans & SUVs

60TH ST., 1615 FREE UNDERGROUND PARKING FREE HEAT & HOT WATER! COMPLETELY REMODELED. 1 BR, $639 - Efficency $449 2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground parking, locked lobby, close to shopping & bus line. No smoking building. No pets. Ask for Everett,262-617-1104

HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS 2012 LIKE NEW 13,800 MILES WHITE, $19,000 or offer, call 262-496-1799 NISSAN Xterra 2002 $4500, 97K miles, 6 cylinder, good condtiion, 262-287-4187 after 5 pm.

84 Residential Rentals

84 Residential Rentals

ZION—Huge Garage sale, Aug.30-Sept. 2, 10am-5pm, 3200 Emmaus Ave. 16 tables, cheap. Small Evinrude motor, leaf mulcher, fishing - camping equipment, 51 years of misc.

50 Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1012426

ZION TOWNHOUSE — Nicely updated 3BR, end unit, 1.5BA, full heated basement w/ washer/dryer hookups. Living room has nice view of huge front yard, private driveway, Tenant pays all utilities. Close to shopping restaurants, transportation.224-419-5552

92 Garage/Storage for Rent

44TH PL., 1920 — LOWER 3BR APT., 2½ car garage, laundry, basement storage, appliances. $925/mo. + utilities. 262-945-9240

49 Rummage, Estate, Moving

SHARON, WI — Modern 1 and 2 BD apts. Country living in Historic Sharon. 20 minutes from Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan. 10 from Walworth. Located on Hwy 67. 262-7362300

SHOREVIEW OFFICE COMPLEX - High Traffic, Multi-Office updated suites; 200 - 1500 sq. ft. All utilities and maintence included. Info: 1262-945-1383 or 1-262-945-1381

PUPPIES — German Shepherd Puppies for sale 6 weeks old. Combination East and West Bloodlines. First Class qualities, Stable and sure temperament. Call 262-945-5096.

ZION—Large Garage Sale. Clothes, housewares & miscellaneous. Sat., Aug. 31, 10am5pm, 1720 Gilead

Or apply in person.

“Quiet Residential Living�

Miscellaneous

COMPUTERS — Windows 7 Laptops & Desktop Computers and also Windows reloads. Call 262-498-5598. EARLY WINTER SALE—Snow throwers, make offer, Sat. or Sun. only. 9am-5pm, 1347 Franklin Ave., Winthrop Harbor

20

59 $100 and Under 62

LAKE GENEVA - Geneva National Condo 2 BR furn. Pool, tennis, golf course views. Security, fireplace. Washer/Dryer. $900 mo + utilities. 262-886-6051. LAKE GENEVA—Kitchenettes and sleeping rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988.

ROOFING

Successful candidate will have:

Committed to advancing the state of lighting, Kenall is an established, stable organization with a proven track record of excellence and great corporate culture. If you share our drive, professionalism and enthusiastic spirit and would like to be a part of a growing organization, we would like to hear from you. Please forward your resume to: ATTN: Human Resources 1020 Lakeside Drive Gurnee, IL 60031 Fax: 847 360-9480 Apply online at: www.kenall.com Apply in person: Monday-Thursday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm; Friday 8:00 am - 1:00 pm 1011221

FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-2456168

84 Residential Rentals

INDOOR BOAT STORAGE with free winterizing and wash, custom boat covers and upholstering, motor/drive repairs, buffing/waxing, Since 1963. AmericanMarineDelavan.Com 262-728-3453

Applicant must have a clean driving record, able to lift and carry heavy items and have a knowledge of the Kenosha Co. area. Hours are 12 noon to 7pm, 5 days a week including Sat. Interested applicants should apply at St. Vincent De Paul Thrift Store, 7531 30th Ave., between 10am and 3pm, Mon. thru Fri. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Job Site ID#1013198

WAITRESSES Experienced, full and part-time, Call John 847-336-7773

20

52 Recreation, Exercise & Sports

RENTALS STARTING AT

640

$

per month

2 Bedroom/1 bath

2 Bedroom/2 bath

all appliances, on site laundry, private patio, balcony, secured entry, garages available

all appliances, full size washer/ dryer, private patio, balcony, private entry, attached garage

24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping

Help Wanted

MATTRESSES — Full $65. Queen $75. King $95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave. Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750.

Call Today to Schedule an Appointment!

7919 60th Ave. #103

G& S PROPERTIES Office 694-3077

Requirements include: • High school diploma or equivalent • Commit to work through Sunday 1/5/14 • Be available to work 12/24/13 and 12/26/13 • Must complete a computer skills assessment • Customer Service experience is preferred • A minimum availability of 25 hours, three to four days per week, (at least ve hours/day) • Rotating weekend shifts required

WANTED TO BUY — BUYING Gold & Silver coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches - knifes - swords & military items & more! 262-497-6688 Joe

52 Recreation, Exercise & Sports

We offer generous discounts on American Girl, Mattel, Fisher-Price, and Barbie products!

Please apply in person between 8:00 am and 3:30 pm, Monday - Thursday and 8:00 am - noon on Friday

.HQRVKDŠV EHVW DSDUWPHQW living! OLYLQJ Kenosha’s best inLQ apartment 3RRO 6XQGHFN ‡ 3DWLR RU %DOFRQ\ ‡ &DWV $OORZHG VHOHFW XQLWV

'LVK 1HWZRUN $YDLDEOH ‡ +LJKVSHHG ,QWHUQHW 2IIHUHG )UHH ,QVWDOODWLRQ RI &DEOH 79 DW 0RYHLQ  Beds %HGV IURP 1 from  $560  Beds %HGV IURP 2 from  $670

BOAT - Seasprite 1987, $7,400 obo, 22.5 ft., V-6 Chevy, 5 Big John Electric downriggers, 11 rods & reels, 20 boxes of lures & flashers, new batteries, on board charger, new 90 gal. gas tank, full canvas w/ windows. Ph. 262945-1198 6024 - 50th Ave.

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12400 Fox River Road, Wilmot, WI 53192, 1-888-325-7954, press 3 for Wilmot EEO/AA M/F/V/D

CAMPER — 1998 Coleman Sun Ridge pop up. Very good condition, 12 ft,/25 ft. extended, AC, heat, propane tanks, fridge, indoor/outdoor stoves, large storage trunk, screen porch. Sleeps 8. $2,700/OBO. Call 262-654-5831. 1013820

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Plus an additional $1.00/hr for weekends Flexible shifts available, 6:00 am to 12:00 midnight

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Effectively problem-solve customer issues within established guidelines.

Wood Creek

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WK $YH

Seasonal Direct Service Associates $12.15/hr

RETIRING—FOR SALE: 3 lawn mower engines, 3 snow blower engines, all $100 each. Also have a lot of new parts for sale at below whole sale prices for lawn mowers, snow blowers, lawn tractors, & repair tools, also electric starters. Call for appointment 847-336-9193

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20

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The Regional News


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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

BENOY MOTORS IN WOODSTOCK

FAMILY OWNED AND

OPERATED FOR OVER

60 YEARS! NEW 2013 RAM

NEW 2013

1500 REG CAB

DODGE DART

SXT 4DR

Stk.#D13-14

MSRP-$19,890 IKL%Q? Rebate-$1,250 

    

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**

17,731

$

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SALE PRICE:

$

21,774

SXT MSRP-$27,885 

Rebate-$2,000 Bonus Rebate-$750 !"   Benoy Dis.-$1,182 !" %

MSRP-$21,790 Rebate-$2,500 Chry Cap Bonus-$1,000 Benoy Dis.-$342 **

17,948

SALE PRICE:

E-mail: info@benoymotors.com or www.benoymotor.com

1790 S. Eastwood Dr. (Corner of Rt. 14 & 47)

(815)

**

$

    

  

  Trailer Hitch

GRAND CARAVAN

LX 4DR 

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SALE PRICE:

Stk.#R13-41



      

NEW 2013 JEEP

200

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MSRP-$25,520 Rebate-$500 Bonus Cash-$500 Trade Assis-$1,000 Benoy Dis.-$1,746

338-5100

Stk.#D13-38

**

23,953

$

!" '

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Hours: Mon: 7:30am-8pm Tues: 7:30am-8pm Wed: 7:30am-6pm Thurs: 7:30am-8pm Fri: 7:30am-6pm Sat: 8:00am-4pm

**Prices exclude tax, title, lic. & doc fee. Includes all manufacturer rebates & incentives. Photos are for illustration purposes only and may not represent actual vehicles. Jeep & Chrysler are registered trademarks of Chrysler LLC. No prior sales. Expires 3 days after publication. See dealer for more details. ^On select models, see dealer for complete details.

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Sports Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools

Thursday, August 29, 2013

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Bay goes big at QB By Mike Ramczyk When a kid is around 6-foot-2 inches tall and 200 pounds, that’s pretty good size for a high school football quarterback. Williams Bay had that luxury last year with Jake Sutter. Well, the Bay grad starts his college football career at Carthage College in a couple weeks. However, no worries Bulldogs fans, your next quarterback is 6-foot-4, 230 pounds, and smashes opposing running backs in the backfield when he isn’t throwing 40-yard bullets. That’s right, junior John Higgins, a bona fide beast who will play middle linebacker and quarterback this fall, is taking over the Bay offense, and second-year coach Derek Diehl is ecstatic. “With Jake going to college, you always look for the right fit to fill that role, and I’m happy to say we found him,” Diehl said Thursday night after practice. “He grew two inches. He went to quarterback camps this summer and placed well. He has really flourished. People forget that he threw for 300 yards in a JV game last year.” Diehl said he can run, and the team will run the Higgins spread. Higgins had some punishing runs last season, but his throwing prowess has improved tremendously. With Higgins, leading running back Jacob Clark and leading receiver Ryan Bonamarte all back, Diehl is excited about the explosiveness of the team. Also, Diehl said Andrew Breen, a sophomore, has had one of the best camps he’s ever seen. The offensive line lost three seniors, but Diehl is confident because the line is mammoth this season. Four of the five starters tip the scales at 240 pounds or more. The Bulldogs erased five years of pain and suffering when they snapped their 45game losing streak last October, but that hasn’t necessarily sparked interest in the program. “Let’s keep it in perspective, it was one win,” Diehl said. “I am surprised we only have 25 kids this season. I thought the win would carry over. Once the win was over, it was done. We moved on, we’re Bay beats worried about the Christian Life next thing, and the season is in front of again us.” The Bulldogs See have won one game page 2C since 2007, and Diehl didn’t sugarcoat that this season is up for grabs for his young squad, which features only a handful of seniors. The 2013 Bulldogs could either make the playoffs or go winless, it’s still too early to tell, he said. One thing is certain — the program is headed in the right direction. “Rome wasn’t built in a day,” Diehl said. “The program is 100 percent moving in the right direction. Mike Coolidge has done wonders in support of the football program. Sports and athletics are changing here, but it’s for the good. You can see it in the community. The basketball team will be good. Our younger kids are getting more skilled. The junior high will be in a tackle football league for the first time.” “We have big goals here. But the kids need to go out and just be kids. They don’t need the added pressure.”

WILLIAMS BAY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 2013 (HOME GAMES IN CAPS) AUG. 23: at Kenosha Christian Life 30: vs ALMOND-BANCROFT SEPT. 6: vs JOHNSON CREEK 13: vs RANDOLPH 20: vs RIO 27: at Fall River OCT. 4: vs MARTINSVILLE 11: at Hustisford 18: at Cambria-Friesland

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

HELMETS WERE FLYING and bodies were flailing as Big Foot netted 71/2 sacks in crunching Westosha Central.

Chiefs pummel Westosha Win opener 38-0 By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net WESTOSHA — Big Foot takes a 35point lead into halftime. Does that sound like something that might have been written last year, as the Big Foot football team routinely took double-digit leads? Not to worry. This isn’t a stray sentence left over from 2012. It’s a line that would apply to Big Foot’s season-opening victory Friday night. Yes, the Big Foot juggernaut is at it again. The Chiefs destroyed Westosha Central 38-0 after taking a 35-0 half-time lead. It was a great way to put a “W” in the column after Big Foot came up one game short of a state title last year. Just as it did in 2012, the Chiefs boasted a fairly balanced attack for a high school team with 23 passing attempts and 34 runs. QB Brett Morris was 16 for 23 for 240 yards, a TD and an interception. That left him with a 69.6 percent completion percentage and a 99.9 QB rating.

“Brett’s first start was better than I thought,” said coach Rodney Wedig. “They did a pretty good job of taking away our base runs, so we threw the ball a lot more than normal and Brett made the defense pay. We converted a lot of third and longs.” Brandon Hausner led the running game with 47 yards on nine attempts. Brett Morris added 38 and Tim Long had 35 and two TDs. Quin Dixon chipped in with another 21 yards. “Long, Hausner and Quin Dixon all ran hard for us,” Wedig said. “They all have a different style and continue to improve.” Linebacker and receiver Gus Wedig, the son of the coach, continued where he left off last year as a two-way star. He led the Chiefs in receptions with seven netting 111 yards. On the defensive side of the ball, he had 10 tackles, a sack and an interception. “Gus has really taken a big step forward,” the coach said. “He is disruptive on defense and we are going to utilize his length and speed to make him more of an offensive weapon as well.” In all, the Chiefs had 7.5 sacks led by Cody Menolascino and William Utesch with two each. Collin Frederick added 1.5

sacks and Garrett Jeters and Chandler Hehr had one each. Hehr also caught four passes and scored a TD. Hausner led off the scoring with a 6yard TD run and Morris added another first-quarter score on a two-yard run. Tim Long scored two TDs on the ground. Morris ended the TD run with a thirdquarter scoring toss of 26-yard yards to Hehr. Ian Gallagher, who set all sorts of records as a kicker last year, was a perfect 5 for 5 in extra points and also added a 26-yard field goal for the last score of the game. As though his place kicking ability wasn’t enough, he also punted once for 50 yards. Wedig said his defense and special teams are especially powerful this year. “And Gallagher’s ability to pin the other team deep or kick it out of the end zone made it a short field for us,” Wedig said. “First drive 30 yards, TD, second drive 16 yards, TD after a turnover, third drive 46 yards TD. They did not cross mid-field until the second quarter.” Big Foot totaled 381 yards against Westosha and allowed only 124. PLEASE SEE BIG FOOT PAGE 2C

Same strategy, usual results Badgers face third-ranked Mukwonago Friday at home But the deficit didn’t last long as the Badgers ran off 15 unanswered points before halftime. Both teams were shut out in the third frame. Hale got its second TD in the fourth quarter with less than WEST ALLIS — The beat goes on. two minutes to go on a 14-yard pass, but the Badgers answered Despite losing its top running back and 39 seconds later with Allen’s 47-run and sealed the deal. quarterback from last year, the Badger High Hale was a mirror opposite of Badger when it came to their School football team didn’t change its characrun-pass ratio. ter. The host team put the ball in the air 33 times and finished As it’s always been during the coaching with 17 completions. era of Matt Hensler, the Badgers showed off a That compares with only 28 running attempts. They gained smash-mouth ground attack — this time with 162 of their 248 yards in the air. seniors Andrew Allen at fullback and Collin Despite losing and using most of its snaps in the passing Broderick at QB. Allen game, Hale had a distinct lead in time of possession. Like the Packers of old, teams know what The only black mark for the Badgers was the fact that they they’ll be getting from the Badgers, but have a fumbled four times, losing three. hard time stopping it. Last year’s leading tackler, Andy Cychner, who also led the The Badgers churned out 402 total yards, 342 on the ground, state in that category in 2012, didn’t miss a beat starting the in a 28-14 victory over West Allis Hale in a non-conference new season, with 8 tackles. Evan Gibson added six more. opener Saturday. The Badger’s will face Mukwonago, ranked third in the state, Allen led the way with 241 yards on 24 carries and Broderin its home opener. ick chipped in 49 on 11 carries. The Chiefs beat seventh-ranked Racine Horlick 43-33 Allen had a TD run of 13 yards to open the scoring and Friday. ended it with a 47-yard scamper. Austin “They are very good,” Hensler said of Borst added 33 yards on the ground and The Badgers churned out 402 total Mukwonago. “It’s always great for us to also caught a pass for 22 yards. Despite its usual emphasis on the yards, 342 on the ground, in a 28- play a bigger school from a bigger conference. Good challenge, even more so with ground game, Broderick also threw a 2314 victory over West Allis Hale. them being ranked so high.” yard TD strike to Andrew Cychner in the It’s an especially keen rivalry for second quarter. Broderick ended the night Hensler as he is a Mukwonago graduate and his father, hall3 for 9 for 60 yards, a TD and an interception. of-fame coach Keith Hensler, is now an assistant to his son at While Allen’s run opened the game, Hale actually took the Badger. lead at the end of the first quarter with a TD on a 10-yard run “My dad coached there for 30 years so we know a ton of the and an extra point. coaches, players (and) families,” he said. “It should be a lot of After a nine-win season last year an appearance in the state semi finals, Badger wasn’t accustomed to running from behind. fun!” By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net


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The Regional News

August 29, 2013

SPORTS

Riding the arm of Aaron Packer fan less than optimistic The Green Bay Packers could be in for a more difficult season than we’ve become accustomed to during the Aaron Rodgers era. When you break it down, the green and gold have only two blue-chip players — QB Rodgers and linebacker Clay Matthews. The pasted together offensive line, featuring three new starters, reminds me of a few years ago when general manager Ted Thompson thought he could make it go with two untested youngsters only to bring back two veterans to finish off the season. But this year there are no more old-timers to bring out of mothballs. Receivers? Sure, James Jones, Jordy Nelson and Randall Cobb are solid veterans and tight end Jermichael Finley seems primed for a contract-year revival. But how much of their reputations are built on the arm of Aaron Rodgers? If the Packers ever lost Rodgers, new backup Vince Young might scramble them to a couple of victories but not much more. Bottom line: This team rides on Rodgers even more than it has in the past. True, there’s some hope with the drafting of power running back Eddie Lacy. But power backs like Lacy breakdown eventually if they don’t have blocking. He was running behind the second team line Friday night and barely got out of his stance before he was plastered by defenders. The fact is that the offensive line is not built for a running game and head coach Mike AP PHOTO/JEFFREY PHELPS PACKER FANS are looking for answers. McCarthy has never put much effort into running anyway. With the no-huddle the Packers seem to favor these days, the Packers may keep defenses off balance for a while, but like any scheme in the NFL, teams eventually catch up. As for defense, I’m not sure there’s reason to believe they’ve grown much. Matthews might be the best linebacker in football, but he can only do so much and last so long if he doesn’t have someone else to take the pressure off him. None of the Packers much-heralded linebackers and Dlinemen draft picks have really done much. When Johnny Jolly, fresh from prison, looks like your best bet during the exhibition season, there’s limited reason for optimism. In the offseason they replaced hard-hitting Desmond Bishop with nondescript Brad Jones and brought back A.J. Hawk, who epitomizes the term journeyman. It was probably wise to cut ties with aging Charles Woodson, but they’ve replaced him with, well, nobody. Tramon Williams is injured and seems to have forgotten football is a contact sport. Sam Shields has the jets, but you know he’s going to get burned a few times, too. Morgan Burnett hasn’t made anyone forget Nick Collins and Devon House seems to have regressed. Finally, does anyone really trust Mason Crosby to hit an important field goal? (Note: As of presstime, a decision still hadn’t been made on a field goal kicker, but indications are that McCarthy is giving Crosby every chance to retain the spot). True, all those shortcomings may be hidden if Rodgers has another one of his astonishing years. But you’d like to see more from a lot of other players. Not to worry, I will remain a Packer fan. One of my earliest football memories is of aging linebacker Chuck Bednarik stopping my hero Jim Taylor short of the goal line in the 1960 championship game. I broke down in tears and it scarred me forever. I have always kept the faith. This year, I’m just a little jittery. I hope my preseason negativity is way off the mark… and that Time-Warner and WTMJ kiss and makeup before the real season begins. Go Pack! Boo to pre-season pessimism. P.S. I’m going out on a limb a bit considering the Packers will be cutting players Tuesday, after our deadline. But what’s more fun than going out on a limb involving sports? If you fall, it’s really not very important in the scheme of things.) Halverson is interim sports editor of the Regional News.

MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS

BADGER GOLFERS LOOK to rebound from recent seasons with the help of a team filled with newcomers.

Higher turnout could mean more wins for Lady Badgers By Mike Ramczyk For the first time in program history, the Badger girls golfers can boast ‘A’ and ‘B’ squads on both varsity and junior varsity. Fourth-year head coach Phil Huff hopes that formula equates to the team’s first Southern Lakes Conference dual victory since 2011. With one varsity staple back, the Lady Badgers will attempt to dig themselves out of the conference cellar after finishing seventh of seven teams in 2012. “We have 20 girls in the program, which is our largest number ever,” Huff

MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS

ALLISON PALEKA sizes up a putt at regionals last season.

said. “We have a lot more freshmen out and have gotten younger. There’s always strength in numbers.” Kate Russell and Sydney Davis are gone from last year, but senior Allison Paleka returns and has stood out among her teammates thus far. Huff will rely on several newcomers who saw limited time on varsity a season ago. Molly Keenan, Ciara Johnson, Landis Warner, Frankie Bobula, Mackenzie Smid and Mora Ring will all battle for playing time on the varsity squad, which plays its top five golfers at each meet and drops the worst score. So how will this young squad improve on last season? “We need to have consistency across the board,” Huff said. “We were really up and down last year. We must have the whole team have a good day at the same time. We can do it, that’s our goal.” However, Huff said most girls didn’t play a lot of golf this summer. With Union Grove returning a ton of talent and Waterford and Westosha Central figuring to be strong, Huff said he must get everyone on the course early to see which players will have staying power. “I want everyone to have a chance to play on varsity,” he said. “We will rotate eight girls that are really close to each other except Paleka, who’s a little ahead. We’ll see who performs the best in the first few meets.”

The conference season tees off Thursday at Hawk’s View against Waterford. Results for Varsity Invite today. Call with questions.

Badgers finish 13th “Everytime we play we are getting better,” Huff said. The Badger girls finished 13th out of 21 schools in the Brian Schroeder Memorial meet in Menominee Falls Monday. Ring shot a 100 and Holli Mortin, 108, in standard stroke play, Keenan and Warner played best ball and hit a 97. Without it Warner shot 106 and Keenan 121, Huff said. Paleka and Johnson played a two-person scramble, and shot a 91.

BADGER GIRLS GOLF SCHEDULE 2013 (HOME MEETS IN CAPS) AUG. 29: vs WATERFORD SEPT. 3: vs WILLIAMS BAY 5: at Elkhorn 10: at Wilmot 12: vs BURLINGTON 17: at Union Grove 19: at Twin Lakes Invite 24: SLC meet at Brown’s Lake OCT. 7: Sectionals at Riverside

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Big Foot/Face high-scoring Comets Friday “Westosha played hard every play and until the end,” Wedig said. “They did a great job trying to take us out of the things we do well. As the seniors had mentioned to me though, they want to play oldschool, tough football and that is what we did with our defense.” The Chiefs host Delavan-Darien for a non-conference battle on Friday. The Comets beat East Troy 70-52. “Delavan-Darien is a nightmare to face from the defensive standpoint,” Wedig said. “They have several players that can score from anywhere on the field and they are well coached and do a great job of executing their offense. I don’t think they will hit 70 again, but we are going to have to score some points.”

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

A SMOTHERING TEAM tackling exhibition kept Westosha off balance all night.

Bay runs to victory over Christian Life By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net KENOSHA — John Higgins almost rushed his weight Friday night against Kenosha Christian Life. William Bay’s 230-pound quarterback racked up 203 rushing yards to lead the Bulldogs to a 41-0 victory against the team they beat last year to end their winless streak.

Higgins needed only 16 attempts. Assuming you don’t want to do the math, that means Higgins averaged 12.7 yards per carry. He added another 127 yards and a TD through the air on 5 of 16 passing. Adding to the ground attack was Jacob Clark who racked up 78 yards on 17 carries. Higgins scored two TDs on the ground, Clark added another and a third

came from Mason Vadermeer. Defensively, the Bulldogs In all, the Bay ran for held Christian Life to 130 total 303 yards on 44 yards, includHiggins scored two attempts, a 7.1 yard ing only 2.4 average per carry. yards per rushTDs on the ground, Ryan Bonamarte attempt. Clark added another ing H chipped in with a ig g i n s 45-yard punt return and a third came from filled up the for a touchdown and stat sheet on Mason Vadermeer. he caught the TD defense, too, pass from Higgins. adding 12 total Bonamarte also added a 19tackles from his middle-lineyard kickoff return. backer position. He was aided

by Andrew Breen with 11 tackles, including one for a loss, and Jonah VanVleet with 9 tackles and a sack. VanVleet also added a 37-yard punt. The Bulldogs went into halftime with a 15-0 lead, but put it totally out of reach with 19 points in the third quarter. The Bay will host AlmondBancroft Friday night at 7 p.m. The visitors lost to Fall River 33-20 in its opener.


August 29, 2013

REGIONAL NEWS

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Community & Commentary Thursday, August 29, 2013

Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters

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Criticism, sports, pay raises, award “Does your paper endorse the comments and views of W.C.? His recent comment targeting Chris Ann’s Resale business seemed like a personal shot at her business. I find this bias, and consider it as him airing his dirty laundry!” That was an email I received last week from California, of all places, referring to a comment Sal Dimiceli wrote in his The Time is Now column last week. There were many criticisms of Dimiceli’s comment on our website plus I received two phone calls and the threat of a lawsuit. First, the only comments I endorse in the Regional News are my own. Sal’s column is in a section clearly marked in very big letters “Commentary.” That’s also the place where we run my column, letters to the editor and commentary by politicians of all stripes. I like to offer a broad perspective and allow varying opinions in that section — including criticisms of the paper and other opinions that I may or may not share.

Here’s what Dimiceli wrote: “Please contact us direct for any furniture, appliance or any item donations. We are no longer collecting or distributing these items through Chris Ann’s Resale Shop. While we wish Chris Ann the best, we are no longer offering charitable donation receipts at her store. My repeated attempts to work with Chris Ann regarding her pricing, offering free items for the handicapped, and other store suggestions, has left me unable to continue our mission together.” Dimiceli, a philanthropist who has given away millions of dollars of his own money, has been promoting Chris Ann’s Resale Shop for months and months. In fact the last few weeks, he’s written strong commentary urging people to support the store. So, I think Dimiceli is allowed a rather tame comment buried at the end of his column explaining why he is no longer collecting or distributing through the store. He said the two of them couldn’t agree on

It’s true, I will be handling sports until we do hire someone else and getting a whole lot of help from other staffers, coaches and athletic directors. But we do plan to hire a new sports editor. We have a couple of promising prospects — a phrase that sounds an awful lot like sports jargon (I’m practicing). One of those prospects is not me. It’s true that I started off in the newsSports coverage paper racket wanting to be a sports writer. “You’re going to love being sports editor I grew up loving sports but not being very so much you’ll give up your jobs as general good at them — a typical profile for a sports manager and editor.” writer (Ramczyk excluded). Those are the paraphrased words of But my career quickly veered off into Mike Ramczyk during his last day as sports news, management and, eventually, into editor of the Regional News. the business side of newspapering. Mike has left us One of those jobs to be sports editor of though was being “So he was sober and I don’t think his hometown newseditor of another paper, the Burling- he was kidding because he repeated weekly with a twoton Standard Press. the comment at the tavern.” person staff. That He’ll be great there meant I did double as he was here. as sports editor. He made those comments prior to the One of my lasting memories was of party we had after work that night. So he standing out in the pouring rain trying to was sober and I don’t think he was kidding keep my camera dry watching the local because he repeated the comment at the football team take a drubbing. tavern. PLEASE SEE HALVERSON PAGE 4D

pricing, offering free items and other store suggestions. Based on the phone calls I received, that was clearly the case. They couldn’t agree and parted ways. How is that inaccurate? Apparently, the two have agreed to not level accusations anymore, so I hope the book is closed on the issue.

PHOTOTORIAL

Cancer causes financial peril Dear W.C.,

Two months ago I had a blockage and ended up in the emergency room. After many tests they found cancer in my colon. I had to go in for surgery to remove part of my colon. Due to an infection I caught in the hospital my recovery took much longer. Since I am 60 years old, and still need to work to pay my bills, this came as quite a shock. I thought I was healthy because I make a real effort to take care of myself. I have had to sell some of my belongings just to make rent this month. I know I have to reduce my overhead to survive. I found a new place to rent that would be much more affordable for me but I do not have the security deposit and first month’s rent. The stress of constant worry over my finances has left me feeling helpless and very scared. I am just beginning to gain back my strength, due to the chemotherapy I have had to endure. My employer has been very supportive by holding my job for me, thank God. My doctors are encouraging that I will beat this, but I don’t know how I will survive financially without getting into a place with lower rent and utilities. Please help me. Fighting cancer

Dear Readers,

I went to visit the woman at the address listed. I knocked at the door of the house she was renting. When there was no answer I walked around to the back door. There I found the woman sitting on the back patio. She looked shocked at first when a man walked around to her back yard, then she looked surprised and smiled as she recognized me. She reached out her hands to mine. I held her hands and introduced myself. She said, “There is no introduction needed. I feel like we have already met. Not in person but in spirit.” I acknowledged her comment and took the offered seat next to her. We shared a moment talking about our mutual love for God, then moved to talking about her situation. The woman told me about her job, her illness, surgery and recovery. The woman had been through a very serious ordeal in the past few months. Thank God her health was now improving. The woman went over her budget with me, along with the assistance she had applied for and was still waiting for. She had been surviving before her illness by doing office work. Our fellow creation needed our assistance to get through a very tough time in her life. She said, “I really miss my job, I have to get back to work soon. The doctors should release me in the next two weeks. I’m getting stronger.” She started to cry, saying, “Being all alone these past months, fighting to survive this terrible ordeal, almost broke me.” PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 4D

The Lake Geneva Regional News — Serving the area for more than 140 years

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JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS

DEDICATED TO BEAUTIFYING. If you ever wonder who waters the flower baskets in Lake Geneva, wonder no more. It’s Mike Cary, who has been keeping the city’s hanging flower baskets properly hydrated for four years now. He said it’s the best job he’s ever had because of the friendly people he meets and the thanks he gets as he goes about his early-morning rounds. Cary is thankful for the help and support he’s received from Kevin Fleming of the downtown business district, Richard Driehaus, city workers, the owners of the Treasure Hut, Kunes Ford and former president of the chamber of commerce, George Hennerly. Since Mike starts his job when most of us are still asleep, many of us never get a chance to say thanks. So I will for all of us. Thanks, Mike. — John Halverson, editor

ReelLifeTV/Videographer Joy Kowald

PRODUCTION STAFF Graphic Arts Director/ Advertising Sales Michael Reinsissel Asst. Graphic Arts Director Sarah Schauf

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2D

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY LETTERS

Library thankful for response to book sale To the Editor: I would like to thank the Friends of the Lake Geneva Public Library for making their 22nd Annual Book Sale on the weekend of Aug. 10 and 11 another tremendous success! The management of the Friends largest fundraiser is a team effort of many individuals who coordinate donations of books, audio-books, CDs and DVDs over the course of the year. The eight days leading up to the days of sale require a rigorous schedule for volunteers who work intensely to haul, sort, put-up and take-down displays, tables Peterson and tents by the weekend deadline. Library card holders of all ages enjoy the benefits from the proceeds of this sale. With the funds raised from their Annual Book Sale, the Friends primarily support youth and adult programming and other special projects. In the Youth Services Department, the Friends’ generosity supports monthly Family Movie Nights which feature new releases and classics for children three to 11 years old. The Friends support performers/presenters at special events for area school students. The library’s annual holiday ornament workshop and Dia de los Ninos programs continue to be funded every year by the Friends. The Friends ensure a summer of fun for local children who enjoy a visit to the library and an experience of new books, movies and programs. Kids and tweens meet weekly for summer craft programs appropriate for their age. With the support of the Friends, the library’s Youth Services Department hosts Fancy Nancy and Star Wars parties, Storywagon, the exciting annual Summer Finale program, and provides incentives to encourage participation in the Summer Reading Program. Area teens look forward to quarterly Teen Reads, a group for young adults which discusses popular titles they may not read in school. In addition, the quarterly Express Yourself series gives teens a venue to explore their creativity by sharing original or favorite artistic expres-

sions of stories, poems, music and essays. A highlight of the Friends giving this year was a special project which included two new computers, games and colored keyboards for the children. In adult programming, the Friends sustain key programming that the community looks forward to attending. One of these regularly scheduled events is the quarterly “Poems by the Lake” series which attracts a growing audience of writers and lovers of poetry with a selected theme. Another is the annual Aldo Leopold program which honors Wisconsin’s greatest naturalist. The community enjoys the library’s ongoing Quilting Bee Series, annual Veteran’s Day program, Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture summer series and author presentations and book signings. In addition this year, the Friends took a special interest in promoting OverDrive, the E-collection of the state of Wisconsin which is accessible with a library card. The Friends sponsored an E-reader hands-on workshop for both staff and patrons. We appreciate the community partners who supported the Friends Annual Book Sale. We are grateful to Gino’s East for the donation of a pizza and salad luncheon for our volunteer workers. We are grateful to Yunkers Industries, Inc. for donating building and street banners to publicize the sale. The Library Board of Trustees would like to express their deepest thanks to the enthusiastic and dedicated officers, directors and members of the Friends’ group for their commitment to the Annual Book Sale and the broad range of programming and projects made possible through their continuing passion to make it a success. For those who have enjoyed a visit to the library, chances are that part of the experience was made possible by a program, a book, a computer or a DVD selection funded by the Friends. Their generosity creates another dimension of quality library services that would not be possible without their belief in public libraries and lifelong learning. Consider becoming a Friend or thanking one. Sincerely, Andrea W. Peterson Director Lake Geneva Public Library

Rebuttal to letter

Earlier riots recalled

To the Editor:

To the Editor:

In her letter to the Editor of Aug. 22, Nancy Swatek blamed President Obama for every mishap the U.S.A. has suffered during the past five years. Although Obama is an intellegent and energetic man, he is not running this country single-handedly. There are the Legislative and the Judicial branches of government, the military services and the civil service. They deserve some of the credit when things go right and some of the blame when things go wrong. Swatek also claims that the mass media are not critical of President Obama. Apparently she has never heard the Fox TV Channel or Rush Limbaugh or the many other hate-mongers. As for me, I am still waiting for the mass media to criticize Bush and Cheney for lying to Congress and to the American people about Iraq having weapons of mass destruction. That led to an unneccessary war and the deaths of more than four thousand American men and women.

You covered the 1967 riots quite well, but nothing is ever said of the riots which had occurred earlier. I don’t know the exact year, but I know for sure it was before I went into the service in 1965. I wasn’t old enough to drive yet but if I had to guess of the year it would either be 1963 or 1962. The riots were bad enough to call in the National Guard. The Lake Geneva Fire Department was called out to hose down the crowds. A friend of mine who was in the city tried to leave because town was getting really crazy and was shot by one of Lake Geneva’s police officers. It happened between the Taffy Twist Lounge and what is now Hog’s and Kisses. I believe he was shot in the arm when he couldn’t hear the officers telling him to stop because of the battling bands at the local bars. It was also on a Fourth of July weekend. I was in the service during the 1967 riots and as a matter of fact I was in Vietnam at the time. I would be curious as to when the earlier riots took place if you have that information in your older records.

Marvin Hersko Lake Geneva

Gary Holden Lake Geneva

Food pantry thankful for support, caring To the Editor: Thousands of our less fortunate neighbors have been served by the WC Food pantry and Resource Center in the past years. When you drive by our facility during open hours of operation, the parking lot is always full. The need for our service has grown exponentially since the first day we opened our doors. The only way this has been possible is because of a concerned and caring community that always comes through when there is a need. One of the greatest needs in the food pantry business is food storage. Due to government budget cuts and a tough economic climate, there are times when our sources of food are empty. Other times, when there is an abundance of food product, we purchase everything we can to buffer the “slim” times. When this occurs, we have no advance notice and need additional storage within a few

hours. Every time this happens we call Stinebrink’s Piggly Wiggly and, between the Lake Geneva and Delavan stores, they always make room for our product. Without this act of compassion, our clients could never enjoy the bounty of food we have been able to consistently offer. The Stinebrink family has supported this project since its inception and seldom receives the praise they are worthy of. On behalf of the staff and clients at our food pantry, thank you for always caring enough to make a difference in the lives the less fortunate. Sincerely, Jim and Ardith Drescher Frank Guske Jr. Lake Geneva

FROM THE FILES

Time flies Sept. 2, 1993 Myra Kunze, Geneva township, retired as a dispatcher with the Lake Geneva Police Department. She held the position from 1973-80 and from 1984 until now. Lake Geneva school district members who were recognized with gold watches for 25 years of service included Sam Gonzales, Letha Kuecker, Gloria Parsons and Judy Schwab. Marilyn Snudden, Zenda, retired after more than 14 years of service to administrators at Northwestern Military and Naval Academy. Geraldine Raisler Hedberg, Fontana, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Stout, donated $410,000 to the university’s $10 million Fryklund Hall campaign, to create an advanced manufacturing center on campus. Karla Shultis is the new eighthand ninth-grade science teacher and high school physics teacher at the Williams Bay schools.

Sept. 4, 2003 The Lake Geneva Custodial Scholarship Fund awarded scholarships to 11 Badger High School graduates, including Mike Kuchera, Jacob Sherman, Craig Cook and Karen Pienkos. Among the Brookwood School teachers at the year-opening breakfast were Jerry Jansen, Shari Amon, Donna Schlitz and Charlene Kazmier. Kyle Adams, Bloomfield township, made Walworth County Fair history when he was named the first male Fairest of the Fair. Badger High School freshman Ben Morgan was one of nearly 4,000 athletes who competed at the State Games of America National Championship in Hartford, Conn., earning gold medals in 100- and 200-meter dashes and silver in the discus. The Big Foot High School girls tennis team defeated Edgerton 5-2, for a 2-1 record for the year.

LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor must be signed by the writer, include a phone number and address in order to be considered for publication in the Lake Geneva Regional News. No names will be withheld. Letters emailed to the Regional News must contain a telephone number and address so the writer can be reached. They should be sent to jhalverson@lakegenevannews.net. The Regional News reserves the right to edit letters. Letters that are libelous, vulgar or profane will not be published. Poetry also will not be published. All decisions regarding this letters policy are at the discretion of the editor. The deadline for submitting a letter for any given week is 5 p.m. Friday.

When light actually hides the big picture Driving northwest from Chicago toward Lake Geneva, as we begin to cross farmland, I notice domes of light pop up on the horizon. I soon learned that these are artificial light emissions rising up from villages and towns and shopping and industrial areas. These light domes are what astronomers call light pollution, and they increasingly make the sky seem to glow while interfering with man’s ability to see the stars clearly. Scientists now know that some 50 percent of the light on earth seen from space is wasted energy, serving no purpose, accidentally spilling upward. An estimated one and a half billion dollars a year of such wasted light energy is emitted skyward from the U.S. alone. Now, some two-thirds of the night sky around our globe is clouded by such man-made light pollution. One of the often over-looked dimensions of conservation in our natural habitat is man’s wasteful and damaging pol-

lution of the night sky with unneeded and easily attenuated man-made light. This is one aspect of atmospheric pollution we can readily control. Way too many of our street lights, security lights and shopping lights, from major cities like Chicago to small towns like Lake Geneva are robbing our people, young and old, of seeing the wonders of the night sky. The Milky Way, the massive galaxy of which the Earth is a part, is invisible to most people in cities and even small towns. Most of the starry sky is invisible, because of modern light pollution. When the University of Chicago opened Yerkes Observatory, the world’s first astrophysical laboratory and still home to the largest conventional telescope ever created, on the shores of Lake Geneva in the tiny village of Williams Bay, it was because there was little to no light pollution. The village, some 85 miles from Chicago, had yet to be electrified in 1897

when the famed observatory opened, and nection to the vastness of the universe the large lake provided the observatory among younger generations, and perhaps almost absolute darkness for viewing contributing to a growing self-centeredtoward the east, south and west. ness. Even today, when most modern I wondered if the lack of public and research telescopes are located on moungovernmental support for a manned tain tops in remote unpopulated areas, space program is partly because we are we were recently able on a clear summer’s being increasingly disenfranchised in night to stand on the lawn outside Yerkes our relationship to the cosmos. and, prompted by an expert observer, Have today’s generations begun to begin with our naked eyes, to make out believe that our increasingly urban life the Milky Way and other long unseen here on earth, under our expanding mysteries of the localized bubbles of “Way too many of our street stellar umbrella. light, is “all there is” Having just lights, security lights and shopping for mankind? seen a documentary Or are we still lights, from major cities like on light pollution part of a cosmic conChicago to small towns like Lake tinuum that offers called “The City Geneva are robbing our people, endless learnings, Dark” on PBS, that talked about the exploration and young and old, of seeing the disappearance of even a relative eterwonders of the night sky.” details in the night nity of succession sky for so many for our species and people, and even the possibility that too life now on Earth? much light at night could contribute to Pointing our man-made lights downhealth problems for some, I experienced ward and lifting our eyes once again to an “aha” moment about modern society. the night sky may “illuminate” the way to Part of the film’s premise is that light fresh possibilities. pollution was taking away the visual con-


August 29, 2013

The Regional News

3D

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY DEATH NOTICES

OBITUARIES

Robert J. Fritch, Sr., 89, of Lake Geneva, died Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013 at his home. Private family services were held at Windridge Memorial Park Cemetery in Cary, Ill. Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva assisted the family with arrangements. To sign the online guest registry please go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.

Nicholas E. Petros (Petropoulos)

Caroline A. Jurenci, 63, of Chicago and formerly of Pell Lake and Elkhorn died Sunday morning, Aug. 25, 2013, at Rainbow Hospice Ark in Park Ridge, Ill. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 at the Haase-Lockwood & Associates Funeral Home in Genoa City. Interment will be in Bloomfield Cemetery. Visitation will be from noon until time of services at the funeral home. For online guestbook: www.haaselockwoodfhs.com. Daniel Kavanaugh, 90, of Lake Geneva died in his home on Monday, Aug. 26, 2013. Mass of Christian burial will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 30 at St. Francis De Sales Church in Lake Geneva. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m Thursday, Aug. 29 in the chapel of Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva. For further information, please visit www.derrickfuneralhome.com. Evelyn J. LeMaster, 92, of Lake Geneva, died Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, at Geneva Lake Manor Nursing Home in Lake Geneva. Memorials services for Evelyn will be held at a later date. Derrick Funeral Home & Cremation Services is assisting the LeMaster family with arrangements. To sign the online guest registry, please go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com. Wallace A. Norin, 87, of Twin Lakes died Saturday morning Aug. 24, 2013, at his home. Visitation was from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 26 at the Haase-Lockwood & Associates Funeral Home in Twin Lakes. Private family interment was in Mound Praire Cemetary on Tuesday, Aug. 27. For online guestbook: www.haaselockwoodfhs.com.

Nov. 1, 1932 - Aug. 13, 2013 Nicholas “Nick” E. Petros (Petropoulos), 80, passed away on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 in Bonita Springs, Fla. Survived by his loving wife, Angele (nee Pappas) and beloved sister, Toula (Petropoulos) Karides. Dearest father of Nick and Cherie (Brian) Shanahan. Proudest “Papou” of Alexandra, Angelica and Samantha. Survived by sisters-in-law, Sophie Petropoulos and Pauline Youtsos. Preceded in death by his parents, Strat and Doris Petropoulos; brother, Tom Petropoulos; sister, Kostoula Demopoulos; brothers, Gust and George Youtsos. Also survived by nieces, nephews and cousins. Visitation was from 10 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 19 at Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 9400 W. Congress St., Milwaukee followed by the funeral service at Entombment Wisconsin Memorial Park. He graduated from Lincoln High School in Milwaukee. Followed by further studies with General Motors and Ford Motors. Nick was a General Motors auto dealer in Watertown until he retired and moved to Lake Geneva where he later operated Ford and GM dealerships. He enjoyed traveling, cooking and spending time with his family. Nick had a special love for Greece and all things Greek. Over the years he traveled to Greece many times to maintain relationships with his many dear friends and relatives there. Nick’s great-

Nicholas E. Petros (Petropoulos), 80, died on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 in Bonita Springs,

Henry W. Rosenthal

Fla. Visitation was from 10 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 19 at Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 9400 W. Congress St., Milwaukee, followed by the funeral service at Entombment Wisconsin Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, memorials made be made to Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church or the American Cancer Society.

Henry W. Rosenthal,

95, of Walworth died Friday, Aug. 23, 2013, at Golden Years in Walworth. Memorial service was held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, at Haase-Lockwood & Associates Funeral Home and Crematory, 730 N. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn. Visitation was from 10 a.m. until time of service. Online guestbook is at www.haaselockwoodfhs.com.

Richard F. Rurey, 73, of Linn Township died at his home on Friday, Aug. 23, 2013. Service for Richard will be held on Saturday, Sept. 7 in the chapel of the United Methodist Church of Lake Geneva at 10 a.m. For more information please visit the website of Derrick Funeral Home and Cremation Services at www.derrickfuneralhome.com.

Women’s group luncheon nears You can join the Geneva Lake Women’s Association at the 2013 Annual Ladies Day Luncheon at the Riviera Ballroom, Monday, Sept. 23. Reserve your tickets today to this year’s nearly sold out event — featuring the ever popular Barbara Rinella, as she spotlights the life of Coco Chanel, style icon and creator of the “Little Black Dress,” the Chanel suit, and the legendary Chanel No. 5 fragrance. Chanel, famous for her timeless designs and refusal to follow trend, led a life not without controversy. Orphaned as a child, Coco learned to sew from the nuns that cared for her, combined her skills and creativity, and went on to revolutionize women’s clothing designs and style. Join the Geneva Lake Women’s Association for the 2013 Annual Ladies Day Luncheon! Tickets are just $70, and include a wine reception, noon luncheon, a silent auction and raffle, and of course, Barbara Rinella’s live presentation featuring the life and times of the legendary Coco Chanel.

Subscribe Today

The LDL Committee is also accepting donations for the silent auction and raffle. Don’t miss this opportunity to support your community and present your business to over 200 women in attendance. The Geneva Lake Women’s Association is a 501(c)3 charitable organization, supporting many needful issues in our community including the food pantries, Special Olympics, Walworth County Alliance for Children, Twin Oaks Homeless Shelter and many more! Tickets are nearly sold out! For details, to reserve a table, to purchase individual tickets, or to make a silent auction donation, visit www.glwa.net, or call Shelley at (262) 206-3917 today!

COMMUNITY NOTE Champs pig roast fundraiser Aug. 29 Champs Bar & Grill is hosting an all-you-can-eat pig roast with all the trimmings with the Southeast Group/Walco Composite Squadron Civil Air Patrol, Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. Along with the food will be a silent auction with signed sports memorabilia and other items. The event will take place on Thursday Aug. 29 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Champs Bar & Grill located at 747 West Main St., Lake Geneva. OPEN LABOR DAY 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cost will be $8 for adults and $7 for children ages six and under. Money will be used to supply scholarships for area kids to attend many 2014 Civil Air Patrol activities. For more information about the fundraiser and Civil Air Patrol, please contact Connie King, Lt. Col., Civil Air Patrol, Southeast Group Deputy Commander at (414) 588-2053 or email at: ltcol.csking@gmail. com. HIGHWAY 12, RICHMOND, IL • (815) 678-2500 SALE DATES: AUG. 29–SEPT. 4, 2013

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VIDEO GAMING IS HERE!

$12

$7

$1 DOMESTIC BOTTLES $2 WELL DRINKS

Steven J Lois Financial Advisor 500 Commercial Court, Suite 100 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-8252

We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct printed errors.

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Now open for Dinner 3 p.m.–Close Monday–Saturday

Call 262.248.4444

Henry W. Rosenthal, 95, of Walworth died peacefully Friday, Aug. 23, 2013, at Golden Years in Walworth. He was born Nov. 29, 1917, in Chicago, the son of the late Henry and Olga (Anderson) Rosenthal. He served during WWII in the US Army from 1941 to 1945. On July 25, 1942 in Chicago, he was united in marriage to the former June Sundstrom. June died Aug. 23, 2003. Henry was involved in the construction business in the Chicago area for over 35 years retiring as Construction Superintendent in 1980. Henry was accomplished woodcarver. He was a member of South Suburban Chiseler’s, the Carving Club of Williams Bay, Carpenters Union Local #272. He was a lifelong Masonic Member of Tawas Lodge # 274. He enjoyed wildlife and the great outdoors especially fishing and hunting. He was a devoted husband and loving father and grandfather who will be deeply missed. He is survived by his three children: William (Karen) Rosenthal of Valparaiso, Ind., Judith Blondeau of Morehead City, N.C. and Barbara (James) Berti of Williams Bay. Five grandchildren: Steven Berti, R.J. (Shea) Blondeau, Corey (Robert) Monk, Peter and Adam (Kim) Rosenthal. Five great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Henry is preceded in death by his wife of 61 years, June, and sister Shirley M. Frankenfield. A memorial service was held 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 27, at Haase-Lockwood & Associates Funeral Home and Crematory, 730 N. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn. Visitation was from 10 a.m. until time of service. Online guestbook is at www.haaselockwoodfhs.com.

of Wine & Cheese

AMERICAN CAFÉ

When we lose our parents, it’s true we lose much that can’t be replaced. But we are left with much to cherish. Consider the importance of your parents heritage, family ancestry, traditional values and wisdom. Their love is never lost when we recall and reflect on the many precious moments they shared with us.

Nov. 29, 1917 - Aug. 23, 2013

DINNER SPECIALS

“A girl should be two things: classy and fabulous.” —Coco Chanel

est passion in life came from his deep love for his family. He instilled this belief in his children and grandchildren. He was most happy when he was together with his family. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church or the American Cancer Society. In closing the family would like to thank our nephew Dean Petropoulos for his loving hands-on care and Joanne’s House at Hope Hospice in Bonita Springs, Fla.

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Financial Advisor 302 Third Avenue Fontana, WI 53125 262-275-0314

Financial Advisor 302 Third Avenue Fontana, WI 53125 262-275-0314


4D

The Regional News

August 29, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY

UPCOMING ATTRACTIONS

AUG. 29

SEPT. 15

Champs Sports Bar and Grill, 747 Main St., Lake Geneva, will host a pig roast with all the trimmings (potato salad, cole slaw, baked beans and dinner rolls) from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 29. The event is a fundraiser for the Southeast Group/Walco Composite Squadron Civil Air Patrol, Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. There will also be a silent auction — with signed sports memorabilia and other items. Cost to attend is $8 for adults and $7 for children 6 and under. Proceeds will be used to supply scholarships for area kids to many 2014 CAP activities.

Agape House is commemorating its 15 year anniversary with a celebration including a Taste of Walworth County on Sunday, Sept. 15. The event begins with a 2 p.m. worship service at Grace Church, 500 S. Main Street, Walworth. Following will be the Taste of Walworth County, a food festival, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Agape School recreational hall. 215 S. Main Street, Walworth. Area restauranteurs will participate and guests can cast their vote for the tastiest menu items. Participants include: the Abbey; the Chop House of Grand Geneva; Geneva National Steak House; Gino’s East; Pie High; Popeyes; Scuttlebutts; Geneva Ridge/Lakeview Grille; and Nayeli’s Pizza. Tickets will be sold at the door with a minimum donation request of $5. Proceeds from ticket sales will benefit Agape House programs which aid abused or distressed girls ages 12 through 28, and their families, through four ministry programs.

Ongoing St. Francis de Sales, 148 W. Main St., Lake Geneva, hosts bingo on the first and third Wednesdays of the month. More than $1,000 in cash prizes including progressive Jackpot and pull-tabs. Doors and concessions open at 6 p.m. Bingo starts at 7 p.m. For more information, call (262) 248-8524. The Lake Geneva Farmers Market is held on Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Horticultural Hall, 330 Broad St. Vendors line the sidewalk and also fill the hall, offering fresh produce, garden plants, arts and crafts and more. Geneva Lake Area Museum, 255 Mill St. Located in the city’s former Power & Light building, the facility features a historic Main Street, which includes a log cabin, a blacksmith, a general store, dentist, residences, a school and more.

Visit ReelLifeTV.net for video specials on upcoming events and year-round activities in the Geneva Lake area.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D

Halverson/Appreciate award, yet embarrassed

Time Is Now/Replace fear with healing

I decided then that sports would not be in my future as a full-time gig. Betterment award So, contrary to Mike’s prediction, I’ll The Regional News will be receiving keep my day jobs as editor and general the Community Betterment Award at manager. the Geneva Lake Area Chamber of ComAnd work really hard to be replaced merce’s annual meeting Sept. 11 (see page as sports editor of the Regional News. 7A story for the rest of the story). In the meantime, we’ll try to cover I certainly appreciate the award, but area sports as best we can. I was a little embarEveryone in the news department “The other reader mentioned that rassed when I found will probably be we might ‘get even goofier’ people out that the award chipping in — but running for the job if the pay was presentation mentioned me by name. they have day jobs raised.” This is not false too and we don’t modesty. want to cut back on Anyone who puts his picture in the news. paper every week has to have an ego. So, we’ll try our best, but you may see But if it’s the editorial approach that a little less sports in the Regional News won over the chamber, well, that’s develthe next few weeks. oped every week in staff meetings with If you have concerns, please conthe editorial department. tact the editor who will give the interim If it’s the support of area businesses sports editor a good talking to. in our advertising, well the sales and production departments do almost all of Pay raises that. Last week I wrote a column about pay If it’s being greeted professionally raises for Lake Geneva city council memand dealt with fairly, well, that’s no more bers. than I’d expect of any business. I heard from two readers who made And if it weren’t for this city and its good points against a pay raise. citizens, it would be difficult to do our One noted that being on the city coun- jobs. cil should be an act of giving back — not When we receive the award, all the taking away. staff members in attendance will be He also mentioned that if a pay raise on the stage to receive it because they were given it should be no more than the deserve it as much or more than I do. raise that was given to city employees. Too bad there won’t be room for all The other reader mentioned that we you readers. might “get even goofier” people running for the job if the pay was raised. Halverson is editor and general manThey might just run for office for the ager of the Lake Geneva Regional News. money. And that would be a real disservice to the community.

“I was witnessing my financial demise like a black cloud over me. At first I started to get sicker from the staph infection I caught at the hospital. But that was overshadowed by the intense fear of being alone and helpless while I was losing everything. Then I pulled through by my faith in God. Every time I got scared or felt an intense loneliness, I would pray. When I prayed for help my thoughts turned to The Time Is Now to Help, thinking of all the wonderful acts of helping I read about in the newspaper. I have been so hopeful The Time Is Now would help me.” I replied, “Our prayers have been answered. All of us at The Time Is Now to Help always look to God to bring those who need our help to our attention.” With that she held my hand tighter and cried tears of relief saying, ‘Thank God.’” We went over her lease for her present rental. I asked if she had explained her situation to her landlord. She said she had not because she was embarrassed to explain her illness to him. I told her I could call him for her if she didn’t mind. “Would you do that for me?” she asked. I told her I would be happy to get the rental situation straightened out for her. I called the landlord and after a lengthy conversation, he agreed to let her out of the lease at the end of the month. My next call was to the rental she had found that was not only much cheaper, but very close to her job. I made sure they had the first floor rental still available, and confirmed the heat was included. It would help her considerably. She would need our assistance with first and second month’s rent and security deposit to get her budget back on track with her returning to work. Before leaving I made sure she had sufficient food. I encouraged her to keep up with her healthy eating habits and promised to have her favorite fresh vegetables dropped off.

LOST CAMERA In Downtown Lake Geneva If found please call

815.690.1845

She smiled and said, “I Casey, Girl Scout Troop would be so grateful. It is 3188, Milton and Carol Ann all I feel like eating.” I con- Ancevic, Randall and Margratulated her on being so garet Smith, Michael Glass, diligent in prayer and fightGerald and Marilyn Wilkin, ing for her health. George and Lauretta In a few short weeks the Clettenberg, Dorothy Butek, woman was moved and setCarolyn May Essel, Michael tled into her new rental. She and Sally Anne Chier, Wilwas so very grateful for our liam and Kimberly Basford, assistance that helped keep Dallas and Henrietta Briggs, her from homelessness. A Peoples Bank Employkind volunteer visited every ees, Aurora Health Care now and then Employee and I called “I called the landlord Partnership to make sure C a mp a i g n , and after a lengthy she did not J u d i t h have any M a c k e s s y, conversation, he more finan- agreed to let her out S h a n cial needs. non Hahn, of the lease at the She continRebecca end of the month.” ues to reasHansen, sure me she J e a n n e is stronger McD on a ld , every day, back at work and Mary Cucchi, Gene Kraukloving life. lis, Heidi Hall, Shawna Together, we will con- Kneipper, W.C. Family tinue to replace the fear, Resource Center/Food pain and suffering of pov- Pantry volunteers, and all erty, with compassion, healthe God loving volunteers of ing, caring and sharing with all our caring food pantries, our hearts to change lives. all of you who support The Thank you for helping us Time Is Now to Help donaachieve God’s good works tion boxes, and the busifor those in desperate need. nesses that allow our donation boxes. Health and Happiness, Anyone who would like God bless everyone, a Time Is Now donation box W.C./Sal in your business, please call (262) 249-7000.

Send checks to The Time Is Now to Help P.O. Box 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 The Time Is Now to Help is a federally recognized 501(c)3 charitable organization licensed in the states of Wisconsin and Illinois. You will receive a tax deductible, itemized thank you receipt showing how your donation provided assistance for the poverty stricken.

A special thank you Fox Charities, Lake Geneva School of Cooking, Chef John Bogan, Pentair Foundation, Dick and Jean Honeyager, Katie Alder, Kunes Country Auto Group, Lake Geneva Area Realty, Jim and Ardith Drescher, Therese Kuban, Clarence and Marilyn Schawk, Martin Group, John Stensland and Family, Peterson Drywall, Lake Geneva Opticians, Daniel and Donna

Memorials Les and Pauline Malsch in memory of their son Mark Malsch. Les and Pauline Malsch in memory of Keith Eytcheson, Jr., Jay Smarslik, and Jean Watts.

Furniture donations Please contact us direct for any furniture, appliance or any item donations. (262) 249-7000. We are no longer collecting or distributing these items through Chris Ann’s Resale Shop. If you would like to donate your items to The Time Is Now to Help please email info@timeisnowtohelp.org, message us on Facebook.com/thetimeisnowtohelp or call (262) 2497000. Thank you and God bless you.

Please visit www.timeisnowtohelp.org

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