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Police and Fire Commission members, aldermen go through emergency training Page 6A

141st year, No. 37

Keeping you current since 1872

Thursday, September 12, 2013

2012 WNA GENERAL EXCELLENCE WINNER

City hires contractor for river tunnel work

Parking study review finds some holes Parking commission to revise report, send it to city council By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net

By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net

was that people parking in the downtown generally didn’t stay much longer than two hours. The parking turnover study was done in two parts, one just before the peak season May 16 and 18, and one after tourist season was in full swing, July 18 and 20. What the turnover count found was that, averaging all four days together, 66 percent of those who parked in the downtown area parked for just two hours or less. More than one commissioner questioned whether that was true.

Globe Contractors Inc. was hired by the Lake Geneva City Council on Monday to repair the enclosed waterway beneath Main Street. Globe entered the winning bid of $221,400 to do the job. The council also included a 3 percent contingency fund for unforeseen problems. The project, to be funded out of Tax Increment Finance District 4 funds, was approved 6-1 with Alderman Alan Kupsik absent and excused. Alderman William Mott, who chairs the council’s public works committee, objected to the 3 percent contingency, arguing that the work should be done for the $221,400 bid. Alderwoman Sarah Hill, who chairs the finance committee, said having Mott a contingency fund is necessary. “It’s underground and you don’t know what you’ve got until you open it up,” Hill said. City Administrator Dennis Jordan said the 3 percent is for any work above and beyond what was bid. He said Globe will not receive that money up front. Jordan said Globe is expected to do the work for the bid amount. Within the contract, there is also a provision that if Globe is able to do the work for less, Winkler it will refund the difference to the city, he said. The enclosed waterway, at Main Street and Lake Shore Drive is where the White River leaves Donian Park and dives underground to emerge at the former Hillmoor Golf Course. The concrete structure that holds up the street is old and is showing signs of failure.

PLEASE SEE STUDY PAGE 7A

PLEASE SEE PROJECT PAGE 6A

More coverage on 1D

Members of the Lake Geneva Parking Commission reviewed some of the errors, oversights and omissions of the preliminary parking report during a special meeting Sept. 4. “I think we need to plug all the holes and have them issue a final report,” said Mayor Jim Connors, who attended the meeting. The first draft of the final parking study report should be ready for the parking commission’s regular Sept. 18 meeting, Connors said. That will give the parking commission one more chance to review it and make recommendations before an Oct. 7 public hearing. The public hearing will be scheduled just prior to the city council’s committee of the whole meeting. Representatives from Rich & Associates, the consultants who wrote the report, are expected to be at the meetings. In November, the Lake Geneva City Council hired Rich & Associates, Southfield, Mich., for

$1.25

$26,325 and charged the consulting company with developing a parking study and plan for the city. Rich took six weeks to gather data, from about mid-May to mid-July before submitting the 106-page preliminary report in early September. The study found that the city has a total of 3,122 year-round parking spaces, public and private. The consultants did not put a time table on their recommendations, but indicated that sooner or later, the city needs to consider a parking structure. Rich & Associates recommended the Cook Street lot, behind the Geneva Theater, as the site for the new parking structure. That recommendation received little attention from the commissioners. Alderwoman Sarah Hill, who represents the city council on the commission, said she didn’t think the consultants made a strong argument for a parking structure. What caught some of the parking commissioners by surprise

Entertainment option still open for theater By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net An arts and entertainment venue at the Geneva Theater is still not out of the question. In a reply to an emailed query sent by the Lake Geneva Regional News last week, Bill Jachimek of Phoenix, the new owner of the theater, said he’s still investigating the possibility of keeping the theater an entertainment venue. However, Jachimek said that to make that work, the Geneva Theater will need a liquor license and it will need to keep the area in front of the theater clear as a bus drop-off point. No liquor license is currently available in Lake Geneva, and the city is currently reviewing and revising a parking study that shows the city has

“The original theater itself is small as theaters go. It is about 45 feet wide,” Geneva Theater owner Bill Jachimek wrote. “Most theaters that have reinvented themselves are at least twice the size.” a parking deficit in the summer. Adding parking on the city streets is one way to address that deficit. “My original plan was to turn the building into retail space but after talking with the Save The Theater Group (Friends of Geneva Theater) I promised to make every effort in keeping it as an entertainment venue,” Jachimek wrote in his Sept. 5 email. The problem facing anyone trying to use the theater for the perform-

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Effie. E. Emerson, 95, Walworth Doris M. Fidler, 91, Walworth John P. Habrel, 86, Genoa City Faith Liechty, 85, Lake Geneva Richard H. Olson, 79, Lake Geneva See page 3D for more death notices

ing arts, is that the Geneva Theater is smaller than most theaters that have been preserved, Jachimek said. “The original theater itself is small as theaters go. It is about 45 feet wide,” Jachimek wrote. “Most theaters that have reinvented themselves are at least twice the size. The more recent addition does little good to enlarge the space because it is actually a separate building with its own walls. When you have a production or a talent booked into the theater it costs the same whether you have 300 seats or 900 seats. In a smaller venue you are limited to what you can bring in and still make a profit.” Still, Jachimek said he’s been in touch with Ron Onesti, owner of the Arcada Theater in St. Charles, Ill. PLEASE SEE THEATER PAGE 7A

Geneva Theater

COMING ATTRACTIONS Taste of Lake Geneva Sept. 14 The Taste of Lake Geneva celebration will be held in Flatiron Park, Wrigley Drive and Center Street. The event will feature food tents from the area’s finest dining establishments, along with entertainment and a “Plaid Party.”

Movie nights at library continue Families and people of all ages are invited to attend the Lake Geneva Public Library’s showing of “Epic “Sept. 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. Monthly movie nights feature family-friendly films. The library is located at 918 Main St. The event is free.

INDEX Editorial .....................1D Police/Court ...............5B TV listings ...............5-6C Community .............3-5D Letters ........................2D Classifieds ...............7-8B


2A

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

COUNTY BUDGET

COUNTY REPORT

Administrator presents county budget Bretl’s preliminary budget includes a tax freeze, county buying parkland in Lyons By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net ELKHORN — County Administrator David Bretl presented a preliminary budget that holds the tax levy steady and includes the purchase of parkland in the town of Lyons. “We have a levy freeze again. I’m happy to report that,” Bretl said during a Sept. 5 budget workshop. “We are levying just slightly less than we did in 2013.” The total tax levy proposed is $60.88 million. Bretl presented his preliminary budget Sept. 5 to the county board. On Sept. 19 the county’s finance committee will hear appeals to the budget before approving a preliminary budget. On Oct. 29 the board will hold a public hearing, and it will adopt a budget on Nov. 12.

“There were only two counties that had a larger decrease in equalized value since 2009. It has been a particularly harder hit here,” said Walworth County Administrator David Bretl. Necci has lobbied the state Legislature for an additional ADA, but hasn’t received it. Bretl’s budget only calls for the county funding the ADA for 18 months.

Other budget items n The budget also calls for security improvements Spending to the Walworth County Judicial Center, which includes Bretl’s budget includes purchasing parkland on Sherispending $250,000 to install a second elevator. dan Springs and Short roads, which Bretl referred to as n A $259,000 vacuum truck for the county’s public Clark Park. Although the majority of county board superworks department. visors have expressed an interest in n A $320,000 expenditure on purchasing the land, four have said they improving information technology for See page 2D for a column by the Land Use and Resource Manageare against buying it. County Administrator David ment Department. “I will probably not make four friends tonight. I have included money Bretl about this year’s budget. n Bretl also proposed that the for the acquisition of Clark Park,” Bretl Lakeland Health Care Center (LHCC) said. “ And hopefully that isn’t a sur— which is the county’s nursing home — prise to people. I understand and respect the views of separate from the Walworth County Department of Health opponents of this. This is a question of roles, I work for and Human Services. the county board, there has been seven consistent votes in n Bretl proposed purchasing an additional cooling unit favor of Clark Park and I have included it in the budget.” and generator for LHCC. At the request of District Attorney Dan Necci, Bretl n In 2000, the county began borrowing money to pay included funding for an additional Assistant District for road projects to work around state-imposed levy limits. Attorney (ADA). Necci has reported that his office is under- In 2013, the county implemented a plan to fund road projstaffed for the caseload. ect with the tax levy. As a result of this plan, Bretl said Typically, the county pays for the DA’s support staff the county will complete about $17 million in road projects and the state pays for the prosecutors. during the next five years.

St. Francis de Sales Parish 148 W. MAIN ST. LAKE GENEVA

ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL & PIG ROAST September 14 & 15, 2013 SATURDAY, SEPT. 14 6:30–10:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 15 11:30 A.M.–5:00 P.M.

Brats, Hamburgers and Hot Dogs

Our Famous Fresh Roasted Pig Dinner with all the fixings, drinks & desserts SPECIALS: The Balloon Artist Tim Glander, Music by FUE and Other Local Artists

SPECIALS: Bingo, Music by Lake Geneva House of Music and Other Local Artists

ACTIVITIES Auction • Raffles • Bingo (SAT. ONLY) • Beer & Wine Tent Live Music • Horseshoes, Bocce Ball & Other Games Races • Dunk Tank • Children’s Games • Bounce House Antique Fire Truck • Walworth County Sheriff’s Car Child Fingerprinting & Safety • McGruff the Crime Dog Used Book Sale (new too) • And so much more!

CASH RAFFLE: $10,000 Grand Prize and Other Cash Prizes Totaling $5,000 Winner Need Not Be Present

Tax levy freeze A tax levy freeze doesn’t necessarily mean a property owner’s tax bill will decrease. Instead, it means that the county is budgeting to spend the same amount of county tax dollars in 2014 as it did in 2013. The effect this has on an individual property owner’s taxes will depend on whether the owner’s assessed value changed from the previous year. The county is also only one of the taxing bodies that appears on the final bill. Local municipalities, the state, local school districts and Gateway Technical College also appear on tax bills. Bretl said one of the reasons the tax levy freeze is possible is that the county has decreased its total debt. In 2006, the county made $7.9 million in debt payments. In 2013, the county is projected to pay about $2 million. “There has been a huge decrease in the debt service column, that has provided a lot of flexibility in the budget,” Bretl said. In 2013, the county board approved changes to its employee health insurance, which saved taxpayers about $1 million. “That is one reason why we are able to come up with that levy freeze,” Bretl said. “Our employees are going to get a different plan than they had and will have larger copays and deductibles.” Another factor is reduced spending with Children with Disabilities Education Board (CDEB). In the past, the county paid for special education teachers in the county’s 15 school district. However, through a 10-year plan, that cost has slowly shifted to the school districts where the teachers teach. Affects of Economic downturn In 2009 the county’s equalized value — the total value of all the property in Walworth County — was $15.61 billion. For 2014 the equalized value is $13.18 billion. Overall, property values in Walworth County have

THE ABOVE TABLE HIGHLIGHTS the tax levy in Walworth County for the past decade. The table was taken from the Walworth County website.

THE TOTAL EQUALIZED VALUE in Walworth County has been on the decline. The table was taken from the Walworth County website. declined 15.57 percent since 2009. “That is a sobering reminder of what people have to deal with,” Bretl said. “There were only two counties that had a larger decrease in equalized value since 2009. It has been a particularly harder hit here.” In 2007, Walworth County collected $3 million on its investments. The county invests money it collects from property taxes until it needs to spend it. For next year, the county is projecting it will receive a half-million. “Anybody with CDs or savings accounts can attest to the fact that they have the same problem we do,” Bretl said. “This is certainly a factor for folks living on a fixed income. So, in addition to hitting our revenue it has an impact out there in the community as well.” National trouble Throughout the country municipalities have filed for bankruptcy. Detroit recently became the largest city to do so, and its unsustainable employee pension program was a major reason it filed for bankruptcy. “I think you will be seeing more of this in the future,” Bretl said. “When you look at what has caused that there are some common themes, high debt, deteriorating infrastructure in those places and employee benefits that weren’t controlled or saved for.” Bretl said the county board has taken steps to avoid those troubles. In 2005, the county had in excess of $23 million owed in Other Post Employment Liabilities (OPEL), which is primarily providing health insurance to its retirees. To address this liability, in 2005, the county eliminated these benefits to new hires. Annually, it also has been making multi-million contributions to the OPEL fund, and the county is now ahead of schedule on its payments. Because the county is ahead of schedule, Bretl has recommended making no contribution this year, and is proposing to use that money to cover other expenses. Learn more Visit http://www.co.walworth.wi.us/ and click on “departments.” Then click on “finance.” When on the page for the county’s Finance Department click on “budget.”

COUNTY NOTE

Join Us In The Park For

PRESENTS

Flat Iron Park Saturday, September 14 11 am until 5 pm Sponsored by: The Downtown Lake Geneva Business Improvement District Kathleen Clements Design American Classic Rides Classic Party Rentals

FOOD TENTS featuring temptations from the area’s finest dining establishments including Baker House Barrique Wine & Brew Bar • Chicago Pizza Constant Cravings • Galena Garlic Grand Geneva • Lake Geneva Country Meats Popeye’s • Simple Bakery & Market Sprecher’s • The Backyard Tuscan Tavern & Grill • Village Gourmet “PLAID PARTY” at the “MADRAS LOUNGE” featuring brews from Geneva Lake Brewing Company and Sprecher’s, along with a boutique wine tasting ENTERTAINMENT performances by “Neil Diamond,” aka Green Bay’s Paul Evansen @ 2:00 p.m. • The Badger High School Big Band @ 12:00 p.m. and more! WRAP UP THE SUMMER IN STYLE... WEAR YOUR WHALE PANTS, MONOGRAMS AND

PLAID!

Clean Sweep registration due Sept. 26 The required registration for the 2013 Business Clean Sweep is due Thursday, Sept. 26, for the event to be held Friday, Oct. 4, at the Walworth County Public Works Department, W4097 County Road NN, Elkhorn. Business, industries, schools, municipalities and other service providers generating less than 220 pounds of hazardous waste per month are eligible to participate. Products included in the hazardous category include pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, fluorescent and other mercury-containing bulbs, degreasers and many others. There is a charge for disposal. Contact Janet Cline at (262) 741-3367 to obtain a copy of the registration form or for more information.


September 12, 2013

The Regional News

3A

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Walk to End Alzheimer’s set for Sept. 21 By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net For the past five years, the Purple Rose Team has walked the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in honor of Suella Edler who can’t be at the walk. Suella has Alzheimer’s disease, but her daughters Callie Davis and Cathy Elder walk for her. “We started off at a support group for friends and family of those with Alzheimer’s,” Davis said. “We learned about the walk from Andy Kerwin.” Davis said seeing her mom go through Alzheimer’s was frustrating. “It’s a complete role reversal,” she said. “You’re taking care of them instead of the other way around. You have to make sure she’s safe.” That was five years ago. Now Davis and Elder are recipients of the Wally Phillips Spirit Award. “The Wally Phillips Spirit Award was named after our first honoree, Wally Phillips,” Kerwin, co-chairman of the walk, said. “He was at the first walk we hosted in

Lake Geneva, and he died “It’s a complete role rever“We’ve raised more from Alzheimer’s.” than $100,000 pretty sal,” Callie Davis said of Phillips was a WGN consistently over the past her mother’s Alzheimer’s Radio broadcaster, and few years,” Kerwin said. Kerwin said he used his disease. “You’re taking care “Our walk has been recposition to raise aware- of them instead of the other ognized nationally for ness about the disease. the amount of money we way around. You have to “This year, we have raise and the amount of make sure she’s safe.” Callie Davis and Cathy participation for the popElder receiving the ulation in this area.” award,” Kerwin said. Davis said her family “They have been involved with the walk for loves the walk. a few years, and we’ve just really seen how “It’s good to get together. We all share much they bring to the event.” the same reason for being there,” she said. Davis said she and her sister were sur- “We have always been really fortunate to prised when they found out they would have great weather for the walk. Even if receive the award. you can’t raise money for it, it’s just a great “Really? Us?” she said. “We’re just little atmosphere to be in.” people. We’re not a big corporation donatKerwin said Walworth County resiing a ton of money. It really is a great honor, dents are very generous, and they underbut we felt like there is so much more that stand the importance of the walk. we could be doing.” “The disease is just devastating to families,” Kerwin said. “It’s a terribly difficult By the numbers journey.” In 2012, the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in According to the Alzheimer’s AssociaLake Geneva raised more than $100,000, tion, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause and the Alzheimer’s Association wants to of death in the U.S. Those diagnosed with beat that record this year. Alzheimer’s disease live an average of eight

Walk to End Alzheimer’s The Walk to End Alzheimer’s is Sept. 21. On-site registration begins at 8:30 a.m. at Library Park. To join or create a walking team, go to www.alz.org/sewi. On the website, participants can organize pledges and donations. Readers are welcome to join the Lake Geneva Regional News walk team by searching for Regional News under existing teams. years after noticeable symptoms appear. Alzheimer’s causes memory loss and disorientation, and as it progresses, the disease can make speaking, swallowing and walking difficult. “My mom was very scared when it started happening to her,” Davis said. “She didn’t want to talk about it ... we’ve found through the Alzheimer’s Association that there are resources for family members. I’ve used those resources. You don’t need to be quiet about it.”

‘Handicap This’ show Facebook users help coming to resort identify theft suspect Two-man performance breaks down barriers this well if we weren’t doing good work,” Wambach said. Berkson and Wambach typically receive standing ovations at the end of perGeneva National will present the show “Handicap This” at the fourth annual Push, formances, Wambach said. “We really connect with the audience,” Walk or Ride fundraiser. The two-man show of Tim Wambach he said. “They appreciate that. It’s a roller and Mike Berkson is a live performance coaster of emotions, and people leave feeling better about life.” of lessons the pair have learned in their 12 People come into the performance years together. Wambach said the show helps break expecting a lecture, Wambach said. “Our show is entertaining,” he said. down barriers and lift up attitudes. “There’s a lesson, but you come in and start Berkson has cerebral palsy, but it laughing and you laugh the whole way doesn’t get in the way of his intelligence. through. We’re not politi“He has a brilliant cally correct. We don’t mind,” Wambach said. “There’s no average week hold back the truth.” They’ve been doing The Push, Walk or the show together since or month for us,” performer Ride fundraiser and 2010. Tim Wambach said. “We This” perfor“We were doing started in 2010. In 2011, we “Handicap mance are Sept. 15. speaking engagements Registration is free, infrequently back then,” doubled our shows. In 2012, Wambach said. “We were we doubled that. This year though donations are getting the message out. is going to be even better.” accepted. Sponsored by the A few people approached Geneva National Founus saying we should turn dation, funds received it into a show. We both will be split between Lakeland School, really wanted to do that, to do a show.” the Autism Support Fund and Inspiration The show has been a success. “There’s no average week or month for Ministries. The one-mile route begins at 3 p.m., us,” Wambach said. “We started in 2010. In 2011, we doubled our shows. In 2012, we followed by a health fair with complimendoubled that. This year is going to be even tary screenings for blood pressure, glucose levels, cholesterol and bone density. better.” Registration and pledge forms are The duo travels across the country performing the show and sharing the message available online at www.GenevaNationalFoundation.org or by calling Julia Ingerof equality and respect. “It’s amazing. We wouldn’t be doing soll at (262) 245-7310. By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

Is your child artistic? Saturday, October 19th, 2013 School Doors Open at 5:00 pm-Bingo Hall Opens at 6:00 pm

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An alleged purse thief was arrested after the Lake Geneva Police Department posted a surveillance photo of the suspect on its Facebook page. On Sept. 3, police arrested Danielle M. Zitzler, 29, 912 Badger Lane, Lake Geneva. She was confined to the Walworth County jail and charges have been referred to the Walworth County District Attorney’s Office. On Labor Day, purses were reportedly

stolen from Sprecher’s Restaurant and the Next Door Pub. Police watched surveillance footage from each restaurant and posted the surveillance photos on its Facebook page and asked the community for assistance in identifying the suspect. A total of 132,865 Facebook users were reached when the photo was posted, which ultimately helped police identify Zitzler.


4A

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

GENOA CITY – BLOOMFIELD

Village creating plan for McKay’s Park Bloomfield will need to address flooding problems By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net

Did you know?

BLOOMFIELD — If you’re lucky, you’ll hear the bamboo drum-like calls of cranes echo across McKay’s Park and Nature Trails, that weedy patch of land that doubles as a post-rainfall pond. But evidently, the cranes are the only ones using the park, which offers nature trails across its 13 acres adjacent to Star Center Elementary School, W1380 Lake Geneva Highway. In a Friday interview, Bloomfield Village President Ken Monroe said he’d like that “I’ve received phone to change. “I’ve received phone calls calls from people from people asking why don’t asking why don’t we we have stuff like a park with a have stuff like a park pavilion,” he said. Monroe said he would like with a pavilion,” to see a pavilion at McKay’s Village President Park, as well as a children’s Ken Monroe said. play area and a finished parking lot. He said it’s about time the village does something with the park. “Before we can go forward, we have to have a delineation done,” Monroe said. As in wetland delineation, because storm water often collects in the park. Although he said it’s been dry the past couple years, there was a torrential downpour in late June that flooded much of the park. Monroe said he has approached the South Eastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC) to conduct the delineation, “but they’re swamped with requests.” Still, Monroe said he will pursue SEWRPC because he doesn’t think they charge for wetland delineations. But that’s just one factor in deciding the future of McKay’s Park. The other is a stewardship grant from the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Recently, the village board hired Clark Dietz Engineers, Kenosha, for $17,200 to complete the necessary steps for securing the grant — a village needs study, comprehensive outdoor plan, the grant application and a McKay’s Park master plan. Monroe said the first three steps are already finished. The study and the outdoor plan needed to be submitted with the application. Work on the McKay’s master plan continues, he said. On Friday, Monroe mentioned four things he’d like it to include: n A pavilion, roughly 30-by-40 feet. n A children’s play area. n Picnic benches. n A finished parking lot. Which would cost what? “It’s really hard to say,” Monroe said. “Just with what we would propose, I would expect $150,000 … No, you

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There are five parks in the village of Bloomfield, according to the comprehensive outdoor plan done by Clark Deitz Engineers, Kenosha. n Bloomfield Community Park, located next to the village/town hall, N1100 Town Hall Road. n Veterans and Children’s parks, both located on Park Road across from Scotty’s Service Station. n Roller Rink Park, near the south beach of Pell Lake. n McKay’s Park and Nature Trail. Three DNR wildlife areas are in the village, and one in the town of Bloomfield near the village border.

Engineer cost outline *Village needs study — $5,650 *Comprehensive outdoor plan — $6,250 *DNR grant application — $2,300 McKay’s Park and Nature Trail master plan — $3,000 *Already completed better put down $200,000.” The DNR grant would fund about half of that, he said. The rest would be covered by impact fees. According to Monroe, the board established impact fees in 2004. Whenever a new house was built in Bloomfield, $519 was charged to the property owner. Monroe said that money is still available for the McKay’s Park project. Speaking of impact fees, in July, the board increased them from $519 to $900. Then and now It’s been said that in the 1920s, the land which is now McKay’s Park was once an 18-hole golf course. Monroe said the 13-acre property that became McKay’s Park was donated in 1995 by Gene Snow. Snow had a condition, though, and it had to do with the legendary controversial race track proposal near Genoa City. “Gene came to the town and asked if we would support the race track,” Monroe said. “We did, so he found this piece of property and bought it.” Snow purchased the property from a trust in Arizona. “He got it for a reasonable price, but it says on the deed that it has to stay as a park,” Monroe said.

CHURCH NOTE

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Today, McKay’s Park has a nature path and shelters. In 2001, local Boy Scouts worked on the walking path and installed bird houses. Monroe said it was part of an area youth’s Eagle Scout project. Two years later, Bloomfield — which was a town back then — installed a boardwalk and three shelters along the path. “The boardwalk was good because that area of the park there was the lowest part,” Monroe said. He said the Department of Natural Resources funded part of the project through grants. Originally, it was going to fund the entire park enhancement project, but the town wasn’t able to carry out one aspect of the plan. “The only thing we were missing were the water (drinking) fountains,” he said. “There was no water and sewer extension to the park.”

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NOW, MCKAY’S PARK and Nature Trails is 13 acres of largely unused park space. But Village President Ken Monroe wants to see a pavilion, children’s play area and other enhancements. Would it disturb the nature trail aspects which already exist there? No, Monroe said in a Friday interview, because the area where this boardwalk is located wouldn’t be part of the project.

Official Newspaper City of Lake Geneva Lake Geneva Area Elementary (Joint 1) School District Badger High School District Bloomfield, Geneva, Linn and Lyons Townships Village of Genoa City Brookwood School District Traver School District Woods School District Williams Bay School District Village of Williams Bay Village of Fontana Fontana School District Walworth School District Big Foot High School District

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BLOOMFIELD — Pastor Brian Metke, of Trinity Church, will conduct a pet blessing Sunday, Sept. 15, at 10:45 a.m. Pets who receive blessings will receive certificates and goodie bags, which include free pet food coupons. The church, located at W775 Geranium Drive, also is collecting pet items to aid Lakeland Animal Shelter. Visit www.lakelandanimalshelter.org for a list of items needed. After the service, there will be a lunch featuring pet-friendly vendors such as the Twin Lakes Fire DepartMetke ment; Nature’s Feed Pet Store, of Spring Grove, Ill.; Lakeland Animal Shelter; Pampered Pup Spa, of Elkhorn; and Sunset Training Center, of Spring Grove. Pets must be on a leash or in a pet carrier/crate, in good health and have all of their shots up to date in order to attend. Older or aggressive pets can be blessed from a car window if needed. For questions or more information, please call (262) 279-3052 or visit www.trinitychurchfamily.com.

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September 12, 2013

The Regional News

5A

GENOA CITY – BLOOMFIELD

Bloomfield looks to remove lake weeds Village president says $8 added to annual water and sewer bill would fund effort By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net BLOOMFIELD — The question the village recently asked residents who pay water and sewer bills is if they’d pay an extra $2 per quarter, or $8 a year. Why? To fund the operations of a proposed lake management association, which would take care of Pell Lake, a lake which at one point this summer was so thick with weeds it looked like a swamp. But is an extra $8 a year enough for the association to keep the lake clean? In an interview Friday, Village President Ken Monroe said yes. He said there are about 1,500 properties within the village’s sanitary disMonroe trict. Multiply that by 8 and the association would have about $12,000 a year to take care of the lake. Recently, a company removed about 8 acres of weeds from Pell Lake. The cost of that, including the $240 permit from the Department of Natural Resources, was more than $5,000, Monroe said. “When cutting weeds, you’re paying about $200 an hour, and it took them 18 hours to cut weeds (in Pell Lake),” he said. “And they only got 8 acres done.” Monroe added that when cutting weeds, it has to be done twice a year — once in the spring, once in fall. “You’d be looking at $8,500 to $9,000, roughly, at least,” he said. Now, the weed removal situation has a little more urgency than it did in recent years. The DNR is requiring Bloomfield to update its lake management plan by February 2014. If it does, it enables the village to obtain a weed

Birthday brunch held Aug. 29 for ‘Amazing Alice’ Alice Tobias, also known as the Amazing Alice, celebrated her 105th birthday Aug. 29, with a birthday brunch at the home she shares with her son and daughter-in-law, Edward and Joanne Tobias, Genoa City. About 25 family members and guests attended the event, including grandchildren and great-grandchildren, her former caregivers at Geneva Lake Manor, one of her doctors and neighALICE TOBIAS bors. Alice prepares for each day with help from her caregiver, then after a good breakfast she practices on her keyboard for a while. Later in the day she will listen to audio books, work with flash cards for reading and math skills, recite nursery rhymes for enjoyment and memory exercise and walk some laps in the sunroom. She may work a nap into the schedule in the afternoon, before the usual 3 p.m. snack. For about a week before the party, she practiced “Happy Birthday” so she would be able to accompany the singing before enjoying the birthday cake and blowing out her candles. Her son celebrated his 83rd birthday on Aug. 27.

SCHOOL NOTE FFA recognized The Badger High School FFA chapter has been recognized in the 2013 National Chapter Award Program from the National FFA Organization. The program recognizes outstanding FFA chapters from throughout the country that successfully complete an annual set of required activities, encouraging members to grow as individuals, work as a team and serve others in their communities. Chapters that received star ratings during judging in July and August will be recognized at the 2013 National FFA Convention and Expo Oct. 30 to Nov. 2 in Louisville, Ky. All star FFA chapters receive honors made possible by corporate sponsor John Deere as a special project of the National FFA Foundation. The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural edu-

cation to 557,318 student members in grades seven through 12 who belong to one of 7,498 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

removal permit. Monroe said they could apply for a lake management grant. He said he suggested that the updated plan detail how the lake can be managed using chemicals because “it cuts down the cost.” Other area lakes use chemicals, he said, and instead of having to cut weeds twice a year, with chemicals, “it’s a one-time thing.” However, to update the plan, Bloomfield needs to have an aquatic plant study. Monroe said he had hoped the South Eastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC) could do it. “SEWRPC said they couldn’t,” he said. But Monroe said he asked the company that removed the weeds this year, Santec, to provide him with a cost estimate for the project. He expects to hear back from them this week. Ongoing lake weed battle The past few years have been tough for Pell Lake. In summer 2011, the annual power boat races were cancelled because of the weeds. The races almost were cancelled last year, but a group of volunteers scrambled to clear a section of the lake so the event could go on. However, the DNR cited that group for violating the weed removal permit. Monroe said this summer, the DNR would only allow the village to have 8 acres cleared because of its outdated Pell Lake management plan. It was created in 2006 and had never been upgraded. “Before we can cut weeds next year, we not only have to get another permit, we have to get a lake management plan in place,” Monroe said. Regardless of cutting weeds or using chemicals to control weed growth, the plan needs to be in place by next February, he said. As Monroe waits to hear back from Santec, he said

SUBMITTED

IN JUNE 2012, volunteers removed massive amounts of weeds from Pell Lake before the annual power boat races. the board is also waiting on feedback from the survey, which simply asks sanitary district customers to check yes or no on the question of adding $2 per quarter to the bill. The surveys should be returned with bill payments, he said. “As soon as we find out what the (customers) say, how people feel about it, then we can get a lake association together,” Monroe said, adding the association “would be improving the lake” as well as maintaining it.

EDUCATION NOTE Brookwood’s Kanthack chosen for national teaching project GENOA CITY — Brookwood fourth-grade teacher Mary Ellen Kanthack recently has been selected for the National Education Association’s (NEA) Master Teacher project established by BetterLesson. The project is intended to connect teachers throughout the U.S., to share “quality Common Core aligned, yearlong courses, units and lessons that will be freely available to teachers everywhere, starting with math, grades six to 12,” the BetterLesson website states. “This project will provide real recognition and professional opportunities to exceptional teachers around the country.” Recently, BetterLesson announced that 96 teachers joined the project. Kanthack has taught at Brookwood for 13 years. “She is passionate about guiding her students of mathematics in an authentic, differentiated/personalized style, while integrating the latest technology,” BetterLesson states in a press release. Kanthack also is a peer instructor, a classical pianist and has traveled throughout the U.S. as well as Australia, Europe and Asia. “I am thrilled and honored to have this opportunity to work closely with the nation’s best to become even better, to share my expertise and reflections online and support those who need detailed and inspiring resources

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during this very dynamic transition in education,” Kanthack stated in the BetterLesson press release. “I think this project is exactly what our nation’s educators need right now.” NEA Master Teachers will create and share more than 14,000 Common Core-aligned curriculum on BetterLesson. They hail from 27 different states and include the 2013 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, the 2006 Arizona History Teacher of the Year, the Massachusetts Special Education Teacher of the Year, an Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics Award winner, a Who’s Who in Teaching Award winner, a winner of the NEA Foundation Award for Teaching Excellence, Fullbright Award winners and a Presidential Award in Math and Science Teaching honoree.


6A

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Officials feel the heat, don’t mind it By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net It was a beautiful, but somewhat steamy 85 degrees on Saturday afternoon. Perfect weather for wearing 40 pounds of protective clothing, sitting in a metal, smoked-filled box where temperatures can reach in excess of 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit and tearing a car apart with heavy tools. And to cool off, sway in the breeze at 110 feet. OK, maybe no weather is perfect for that. In all, the city’s eight council members, the mayor and seven members of the police and fire commission were invited to a special Elected and Appointed Officials Fire Operations class. Two Lake Geneva aldermen and two members of the city’s police and fire commission showed up to put on fire gear and see what city firefighters do for training. At 8 a.m. Saturday, aldermen Dennis Lyon and Jeff Wall joined commission President Mark Pienkos and Commissioner Steve Madson at the Lake Geneva Fire Department’s main station, 730 Marshall St., for a briefing, before suiting up and going to the city’s public works yard for more of an outdoor style workout.

CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS

FEATHERING THE FLOW, Fire Capt. John Peters shows Alderman Dennis Lyon how water is controlled by the nozzle of the fire hose. Lyon and three other officials observed and participated in a fire department training session on Saturday.

Joining them were about 20 other firefighters, firefighter candidates and officers out for an afternoon of training and sweating. Before leaving the station, the four put on borrowed fire gear so they could experience what it feels like going to a fire. It took nearly 15 minutes for Lt. Dennis Detkowski and others to help three of the four on with the protective gear, that included heavy boots, waterproof and fire resistant coat, gloves and helmet. Madson, who recently had shoulder surgery, couldn’t suit up at all. Later, two of the three would add a 40pound air tank and face-covering mask. Lyon had to beg off that because of a bad back. Detkowski said experienced firefighters are expected to get their gear on in a minute, and are also expected to check, test and then shrug on an air tank in just two minutes. Pienkos, Madson, Lyon and Wall were then driven over to the public works yard in one of the department’s ambulances. There, the four could experience, or at least observe, what it takes to train in operating fire hoses, riding the department’s 110foot-tall tower ladder (tall enough to reach the roof of the Geneva Towers condominiums), and actually use an air tank and breathing mask. Sitting on the site like an abandoned corn roaster was what Fire Chief Brent Connelly called a flashover simulator. The device, basically a two-level sheetmetal trailer, was invented by a fire department in Lake County, Ill. Flashover is a catastrophic situation in which the air fills with combustible gasses, becomes superheated and ignites everything around it. Firefighters are taught to identify evidence of a pending flashover, and to get out. Even then, they often have only five seconds to drop to the floor and then scuttle to the nearest exit, Connelly said. When used to simulate flashover, firefighter trainees are in a lower part of the trailer and the flashover flames shoot safely overhead. Still, temperatures inside the trailer reach 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, and trained operators, vents, sprinklers and two hoses ensure that things don’t get out of hand, Con-

CITY OF LAKE GENEVA RIVIERA SEAWALL REPAIR PROJECT NO. GBG-13-01

NOTICE TO BIDDERS OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City Clerk's office at 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, until Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. for dewatering and surface concrete repairs to the Riviera Ballroom seawall, 812 Wrigley Drive, Lake Geneva, WI. GENERAL: Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clearly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be considered. Bid documents are available by calling the office of the Director of Public Works & Utilities, 262248-2311, for pick-up at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies of bidding documents are available for viewing at the Commission's main offices or at the City Clerk's office, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements are; Contractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and property damage insurance. Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of $1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000 property damage including both injury and property damage caused by vehicles and machinery. Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers. A current Certificate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor. LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable local, state and federal requirements pertaining to public works projects. PREVAILING WAGE RATES: The project is subject to the Wisconsin State Statutes which requires all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates, hours of labor and hourly basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development for a single trade project with a total of $48,000 or more or a multiple-trade project total cost of $100,000 or more. If the bid exceeds these amounts, the Contractor would then be required to compensate his workers per the order. If a Special Order of the Department of Workforce Development is required, it shall be obtained by the City and included in the final contract documents. The Contractor would then be obligated to compensate his workers per the order. BID SECURITY: No Bid shall be received unless accompanied by a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Cashier's Check or Money Order equal to at least 5% of the total Bid, payable to the City of Lake Geneva as a guarantee that if his Bid is accepted, the Contractor will execute and file the Contract and the Insurance Certificates that are required by the Contract Documents within the time limit set by the City. CONTRACT SECURITY: This is expected to be a multiple trade project. If the award is greater than $100,000, the successful Bidder will be required to furnish a satisfactory Performance Bond & Payment Bond each in an amount equal to the Contract Price within ten (10) days after the award of the contract. If the successful Bidder fails, for any reason, to execute and file such contract and performance/payment bond, the amount of the Check or Bid Bond shall be forfeited to the City of Lake Geneva as liquidated damages. However, if the successful bidder's contract amount is less than $100,000, the requirements for performance and payment bonds shall be waived. BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: The City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to accept the lowest responsible bid. The acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is final and binding on all bidders without recourse by rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening of the Bids without the consent of the City. Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva. BY ORDER OF:

JAMES CONNORS, MAYOR MICHAEL HAWES, CITY CLERK

PREPARED BY:

DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES CITY OF LAKE GENEVA & LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION 361 W. MAIN STREET LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311

CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS

SLIPPING INTO SOMETHING a little more protective, Mark Pienkos, Lake Geneva Police and Fire Commission president and Alderman Jeff Wall (background) pull on fire gear as they prepare to go on a training run with Lake Geneva firefighters Saturday. nelly said. In this case, however, the trailer was simply filled with smoke. Wall and Pienkos along with a number of other firefighters, went in with breathing apparatus on to learn first hand what it’s like to be a smokey link. Empty water and Gatorade bottles were piling up when Lake Geneva Fire Capt. John Peters brought out extrication tools. Wall and Piekos lined up with other firefighters to handle the devices that slice through automotive steel and plastic to free persons trapped inside a car wreck.

Unlike the earlier Jaws of Life that ripped through car metal and glass, the newer tools are lighter, more versatile and more deliberate, Peters said. At the end of the training demonstration, the four officials said it was worth the trip. Pienkos said the day just increased his already considerable respect for the city’s emergency service personnel. Lyon said he thought more city council members should take advantage of the training demonstration to learn what their city firefighters do.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Project/Council approves raises Globe was hired to clean out and dispose of debris from the enclosure, inspect and evaluate the necessary repairs for the underground structure. The company will insert a pipe liner inside the old corroded culvert sections from both ends. According to Public Works Director Dan Winkler, doing the work this way will save the city from having to do some expensive roadway excavation work. The company will also have to control the flow of the water from the White River to state DNR standards and maintain traffic control for Main Street. According to Winkler, the company will have to build a temporary dam, and water will have to be pumped continuously into the nearby millrace, which discharges into the White River at the museum. The Geneva Lake Level Corp. will also draw the lake down to minimum flows into the White River during the project.

The project is scheduled to start in October. Of six companies that took out bid packets on the project, Globe is the only one to return a completed packet, according to a memo from Winkler. Globe’s bid came just under the engineer’s estimated cost of $222,000, the memo said. Companies that did not complete bidding explained that they were either too busy, did not have the equipment for the job or were planning to subcontract on the project. In other city business: n Without any further discussion, the city council approved pay raises for the city council members and the mayor. The raises will take effect after the elections of 2014 and 2015. Council member pay will increase from $3,500 to $4,000 a year. The mayor’s pay will increase from $6,000 a year to $6,858. The increases amount to 14.3 percent. n City council members said they favor restarting

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the Geneva Lake Use Committee. The committee coordinated laws and rules governing the lake among the four largest municipalities that border the lake, Lake Geneva, Williams Bay, Fontana and the town of Linn. All four communities must approve identical rules and regulations for uniform enforcement around the lake. The committee helped coordinate creation of a uniform lake code for Geneva Lake and also made the Geneva Lake Law Enforcement Agency possible. In 2002 and 2003, it was the Geneva Lake Use Committee that coordinated the efforts to repair the Geneva Lake dam and arranged for the four member municipalities to share the costs. However, since then, it became more and more difficult for the committee to achieve a quorum. In March 2011, Williams Bay Trustee Dick Chroust, the committee’s last chairman, announced that the committee had been “put to sleep” because it had nothing to do. Since then, areawide issues involving safety and erosion have again focused on joint community efforts to protect Geneva Lake. Last month, Williams Bay Village President John Marra sent a written appeal to the other lakeside communities, asking whether they would be willing to restart the Geneva Lake Use Committee. The Fontana Village Board joined the Lake Geneva City Council in favoring a renewed Geneva Lake Use Committee.


September 12, 2013

The Regional News

7A

LAKE GENEVA

FROM PAGE 1A

Study: Concerns about errors, omissions Connors pointed out that the parking assessment involved taking down license numbers and tracking them, to determine whether those who leave a parking space left the study area, or simply relocated elsewhere. “There is a method in determining the turnover rate is two hours,â€? Connors said. One of the ďŹ rst recommendations by the study is that the parking downtown be reduced from ďŹ ve hours per car per stall to two hours. Kevin Fleming, a downtown businessman, said he was surprised that the turnover rate for downtown parking is about two hours. But he added that he would not want to see downtown parking pushed back to a two-hour limit. Connors said that he would recommend against reducing the ďŹ ve hour parking in the business district. There were no dissenters. Other recommendations included eliminating the twohour free parking for residents, buying parking enforcement another handheld computer and that the city follow proposed federal guidelines for on-street handicapped parking, even though the guidelines have not yet been approved. Hill said it was hard to follow all of the recommendations made by R&A. She suggested that the consultants collect their recommendations into a “recommendation matrixâ€? to list those proposals as part of an executive summary. Hill said she was disappointed that there was no analysis of Luke (parking kiosk) data. One of the consultants’ suggestions was to vary parking rates around the city, charging a higher rate for high-demand spaces and lower rates for spaces that have a lower demand. “What would be the impacts of charging more in peak blocks and less elsewhere?â€? Hill asked. She said the consultants should provide the city with pricing models to show the effects of charging different rates for different parking spaces. And what about shuttle service? “There’s nothing that mentions the feasibility or viability of a shuttle service,â€? Hill said. Would that service offset employee parking concerns? One of the mentioned options is a full-service shuttle,

“People who come from Chicago and Milwaukee deal with these things every day and don’t think boo about them,� Mayor Jim Connors said.

Connors

Hill

Jordan

Hill said. “What if we charge a buck a ride?â€? she asked. Marty Smith, commission chairman, said he noticed there was no mention of TIF funds or ďŹ nancing in the plan, even though most of downtown and surrounding areas are eligible for tax increment ďŹ nance district funding. Smith said the impression he got from the study is that those who park in the city come in different avors. They are beachgoers, shoppers, employees, cruisegoers, path hikers and casual tourists. And some multitask, coming into the downtown to have breakfast and then going on a cruise, or doing some shopping and then sitting in the park. All have different parking needs and tend toward certain parking areas. “My sense is, we need more parking,â€? Smith said. Those new parking areas must be large enough and friendly enough to attract people who want to set their cars aside for a while, he added. “We want more types of parking,â€? said Smith. And the city should be able to direct people to parking that is convenient not only for where they are going, but also for their planned activities for the day. Some of the items mentioned in the study were confusing. City Administrator Dennis Jordan, who was at the meeting, said he read where the city has 37,040 square feet of vacant space in the downtown. “Where?â€? Jordan asked. The old Traver Hotel and the Geneva Theater are two

Theater/Owner still looking at live theater option Although the Arcada is slightly larger than “Retail/restaurant/live entertainment. the Geneva, Onesti believes that the Geneva Available 10,000 square feet. Lease/joint would have a chance of success, Jachimek said. venture/remodel to suit. (602) 618-1154.� Jachimek said Onesti has met with his manKen Etten, Lake Geneva architect and presiagement group and with the Friends. dent of the Friends of the Geneva Theater, said According to Jachimek, Onesti thinks that his communications with Jachimek keep him a liquor license would be essential for the theoptimistic that the theater might still see live ater’s commercial success. performances in the near future. “We found out that there are no liquor However, he said he’s also realistic about the licenses available,� Jachimek told the Regional need for the building to make a profit to keep News. standing. Etten “When we looked over the list of licenses out “I have no idea what his long-term plans there, some seemed to be used very little. We are,� Etten said Monday about Jachimek and will put out some feelers and see if any might be for sale. the Geneva Theater building. “It’s all kind of still up in We have $100,000 in our budget to buy one, but to be the air.� honest we don’t have a clue what they are worth. In his email, Jachimek promised to keep the Regional “It must be like most things, supply and demand.� News updated on his plans for the Geneva Theater buildA call to Onesti went unanswered as of Tuesday ing. morning. And then, there is the parking issue. The space in front of the Geneva Theater must remain free of parking, Jachimek said. “Our business plan includes bringing buses of tourists into town that are touring Wisconsin to see afternoon and evening shows,� he wrote. “It is critical that the parking remains the same in front of the theater for buses. If the city wants to destroy any future chances for this great old building, all it has to do is take away the drop-off space in front and install meters.� Jachimek also has advertised for help in developing the theater. On the building is a red and white sign that reads:

SCHOOL NOTE

Delavan’s 13th Annual Scarecrow Fest starts Sept. 14 in the downtown. The community-wide, family-oriented event showcases decorated scarecrows. All the scarecrows will be tagged and ballots will be printed. The public will pick their favorite scarecrows, and a winner is crowned. Scheduled activities include free horse-drawn carriage rides, free pumpkin painting, free children’s face painting, craft fair & ea market, sidewalk sales, food, and the third annual pie and cake auction. Visitors can also build their own scarecrows to take home with them. The $10 fee includes supplies and instructions for building a scarecrow.

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About the study Rich’s study area was bounded by Dodge Street to the north, Sage Street and Lake Shore Drive to the east, Campbell to Wrigley to Main streets to the south and Maxwell Street to the west. What the consultants found was that the pressure for parking was so great during the peak summer season, that they had to go outside their study area to follow where visitors and downtown employees and business people were parking. The study goes on to note that the current peak season deďŹ cit is 350 parking spaces, which does not include the 324 residential parking spaces. Even if those 324 residential parking spaces are thrown into the general mix of parking, the city comes up 26 parking spaces short on an average summer weekend. Parking is not a problem during the off season, the report concluded. The city still has enough parking for the next ďŹ ve to 10 years, after which the parking situation would become critical. Connors said he assumed from the report that most of the complaints about the new parking system come from local residents. “People who come from Chicago and Milwaukee deal with these things every day and don’t think boo about them,â€? Connors said.

THINGS TO DO THIS WEEKEND

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Amber Bushey received a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science/international relations with a concentration in East Asian studies (minor), magna cum laude, from Carleton College during its 139th commencement ceremony, Saturday, June 15. She is the daughter of Kimberly Bushey and Thomas Bushey, both of Elkhorn. Founded in 1866, Carleton College is a small, private liberal arts college. Carleton offers 37 majors and 15 concentrations in the arts, humanities, natural sciences and social sciences.

obvious vacancies, but they don’t account for the total 37,040 square feet, he said. The report also mentions valet parking on Wrigley Drive and the need for the city to control it. Except, there is no valet parking along Wrigley or anywhere else in the city. The council gave businesses along Wrigley the right to valet parking, but no one is doing it, Connors said.

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8A

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

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Beach sees fewer ‘Dumbest visitors than last year thing I’ve As of Aug. 31, village 20 percent behind budgeted revenue By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net FONTANA —The beach on the west end of Geneva Lake had more than 24,000 visitors this summer. According to records kept by the village of Fontana, the majority of those visitors were in July. The beach saw 13,050 visitors in July but less than 9,000 for May, June and August individually. The village budgeted for $153,000 net revenue from beach usage. They’ve reached 80 percent of that budgeted amount, based on numbers dated Aug. 30. In 2012, the village budgeted for $140,000 net from the beach and earned $164,637. The beach closed after Labor Day weekend, and Village Administrator Kelly Hayden said the revenue from the beach was higher than expected. “We weren’t as lucky as last summer,” Hayden said. “We have been very conservative with our estimates in the budget the past few years, and this year we tried to bring it closer to last’s year actual revenue. It just didn’t turn out.” The busiest week, July 14 to 20, saw 4,896 visitors. Most of the beach visitors are out-of-town guests or didn’t know about the beach pass available at village hall. A single day at the beach cost $7, but a resident can buy up to six season passes for $3, and six additional passes are avail-

able for $5. Nearly 5,000 resident passes were sold this year. Though the state estimates the village’s population at around 2,000 people, Hayden said the village estimates it’s between 8,000 and 10,000 in the summer. “We try to plan for per-person expenses based on those summer numbers,” she said. “We always expect for Hayden more than 2,000 beach passes to be sold to residents because there is such a large summer population here.” While the beach isn’t officially open, Hayden said that doesn’t mean it’s closed. “The gate is open, anyone is welcome to walk on the beach,” she said. “And you’re welcome to swim at your own risk. We don’t have any staff operating the beach house and no life guards.” Hayden hopes to see the beach manager, Danielle Foley, return next season. “We’ve been so very fortunate for our dedicated returning staff every year,” Hayden said. “Danielle has been with us for several years, and she was able to take over as beach manager when Megan Long left.”

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

ever seen’ Rasmussen talks about Highway 14 project By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net WALWORTH — Though the Wisconsin Department of Transportation made a decision on rerouting Highway 14 through the village a few months ago, not everything is set in stone. Village President David Rasmussen said he isn’t happy with many parts of the DOT’s plan. “Once this is done, you can come down to the square and see it and say, this is the dumbest thing I’ve ever Rasmussen seen,” he said at the village board meeting Sept. 9. “I met with two people (from the DOT), and I told them, basically, that I am totally opposed to them preventing left turns off the east side of the square.” The DOT plan has proposed an island on Kenosha Street, partially in front of where the Antique Mall currently stands. With the DOT’s plan, the one-way traffic would flow in the opposite direction around the square. “They want to put an island in ... so that people coming down North Main (St.) can’t turn left. You can’t get out of the square,” Rasmussen said. “They won’t give us money for the bypass, so please don’t ask, but we should be able to prevent this. This is ludicrous.” Rasmussen said the DOT officials also spoke with several local business owners to finalize details about the plan. “We have ideas, but I think rather than us sitting there and saying this is what the village wants, they want input from them,” he said. PLEASE SEE HIGHWAY 14 PAGE 3B

Board discusses New signs remind Lake pay for street Shore Path users to behave department heads Bicycles not welcomed on about 75 percent of the path By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net FONTANA — The village board was unable to reach a consensus Monday night on a pay scale for the directors of streets and utilities. Dennis Barr and Ron Adams split the role of director of public works when the village was unable to find a replacement for Craig Workman. Village President Arvid ‘Pete” Petersen said there are unintended consequences to pay raises. “There are other people that are on salary in the community and for the community who have every right to come back here and say, you gave these guys X amount of dollars,” Petersen said. “Giving an increase to anyone ... without a proven track record in administrative functions I think is ludicrous.” After months of discussion on the pay scale, the village board requested the finance committee break down the numbers. In August, the board suggested a lump sum of $16,000 be made to Barr and Adams in installments. Trustee Tom McGreevy said finance recommended $14,000 as a lump sum, a $2,000 decrease. “The recommendation is that we keep the rate of pay at the regular and overtime rate as (stated) right now in the union contract,” Village Administrator Kelly Hayden said. “Not that while they are union, they will be paid for every hour they put in. It doesn’t make a difference if it’s administrative hours.” PLEASE SEE FONTANA PAGE 2B 1

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Some folk living along the Lake Geneva Lake Shore Path really don’t like bicycles. To make sure that would-be lakeside cyclists understand that bikes are banned from about 75 percent of Lake Shore Path, the Geneva Lake Association, an organization of lake area homeowners, is putting up new signs laying down the law to lake path users. The new signs are also necessary because the old signs, which were put up about 10 years ago, are beginning to show the signs of age, said Don Taylor, a GLA member. Taylor and GLA member David B. Williams have already installed signs at 12 of the 20 known locations where the old signs were posted a decade ago. The new signs are by Joe Savage of Signature Signs, Lake Geneva, Taylor said. Those 12 locations include: n At the east end of Library Park, Lake Geneva. n At the Wilkin residence, Covenant Harbor. n Edgewood Pier 61. n Driehaus Pier 62. n Chapin road, both sides, Pier 80. n Cedar Point, Williams Bay, east of the public beach. n The west side of Edgewater Park at Bay Shore, Williams Bay. n Two signs at Bay Colony South, Williams Bay. n Summer Haven approaching Gage Marine in Williams Bay. n Entering the Shore Path from Country Club Estates. n Leaving the Lake Geneva Yacht Club, Fontana n Approaching the South Shore Club.

n Big Foot Beach, east of the Geneva Inn Pier 805. Eight other signs are being made for the remaining old signs that the GLA members know of. Taylor said other signs may be out along the shore path, but no one knows where they are. PLEASE SEE SIGNS PAGE 3B

There’s no place like Welcome Home Welcome Home is the meeting place for anyone interested in buying or selling a home, remodeling, refinancing or looking for seasonal tips on home maintenance. The September 2013 issue of Welcome Home is on newsstands now and available at businesses throughout the area.

Interested advertisers should contact a Regional News advertising representative at 262.248.4444


2B

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Orthodox church hoping for growth By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net FONTANA — “God willing, we’ll continue to grow and build a permanent home for our church in the future.” Maria Klesmith is a member of the small but still-growing group of Orthodox Christians in Fontana. Every Sunday, the home church on Highway 67 fills with 18 to 40 people from the area. While the church occupies a small renovated shed and apartment structure, the group can’t put up signs or install a parking lot. The church approached the village of Fontana and the town of Walworth for a conditional use permit. “Right now, it’s all agricultural zoned,” Klesmith said. “We’d like to keep it that way as much as possible. That’s why we didn’t apply for a rezone.” She hopes church membership grows and a larger church can be built nearby in the future. “We get more visitors in the summer, when people are up visiting,” Klesmith said. “This past Sunday we had about 18 people, but a few Sundays ago we had 35 or 40. It really varies.” Church history Klesmith said she stumbled onto finding an area Orthodox Church. “I had been driving with my family to

“This past Sunday we had about 18 people, but a few Sundays ago we had 35 or 40. It really varies,” said Maria Klesmith, member of the church. Milwaukee every Sunday for church,” she said. “We were speaking with a priest and he suggested we start a church. I didn’t realize that was something that could be done.” Klesmith said she came home and prayed about creating a church closer to home. “For a few weeks, we just waited, thinking and praying about it,” she said. “Then I was reading the Beacon, and I saw a little ad seeking Orthodox Christians. I reached out to that group right away.” The church met at Williams Bay Elementary School for a few years until moving to its new location in 2012. “We met biweekly then,” Klesmith said. “Now we are able to meet every week.” A priest and deacon come from Milwaukee to celebrate Divine Liturgy in the chapel in Fontana. The church is a part of the Orthodox Church in America, which traces its roots in the United States to 1794, according to the church association website. The name for the chapel was chosen based on the proximity to Geneva Lake. “Our feast day is Jan. 6, and we bless the waters that day,” Klesmith said. Theophany, Greek for appearance of

JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS

HOLY THEOPHANY ORTHODOX Church is home to only a few icons now, but Maria Klesmith said they’re just getting started. “Many of our icons we’ve received from other Orthodox churches, and once we grow and find more items for our church, we’ll pass them along to another just-starting church like we are now.” God, is the day Orthodox Christians commemorate as the day Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist. Western Christians cel-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

Fontana/Trustees can’t agree on pay rates Hayden said both Barr and Adams would make overtime pay for any meetings they attended. Petersen said other village employees aren’t paid that way. “The chief of police is typically here (at meetings),” Petersen said. “He doesn’t get a nickel extra for his administrative time.” Trustees Cindy Wilson and Rick Pappas said it was “embarrassing” for Pappas the village to keep publicly reducing the pay of the directors. “We’ve gone from a pay increase at our regular meeting to a special meeting for a lump sum pay out instead of that hourly increase,” Wilson said. “At that meeting, we referred it to finance with this $16,000 amount. We decided on that. After much discussion, they determined that perhaps it should be $14,000.” Wilson A vote to approve the $14,000 lump sum payments each to Barr and Adams was tied. Pappas suggested a vote to pay the directors $16,000, but Petersen said the board was locked. Trustee George Spadoni said the board should take the finance committee recommendation and “see how things work” with the two directors. “We said we’d refer this to finance,” he said. “That’s what we did. I don’t know if this is going to work or not. We might have to go out and hire a new public works director. I can’t say this is best for the village or not. I think we make a commitment for the payment and we move forward. If all hell breaks loose and this board decides to go with a director, we’ll revisit this discussion. I think that’s fair on both sides.” Hayden said once the board approves a pay scale for the two directors, the union must also approve of it before it takes effect.

Rescue squad funds Because the village’s rescue squad no longer exists as a stand-alone entity, any money the squad held will be turned over to the village. Hayden said the squad will transfer its money to the village’s account with a designation. “The rescue funds will be brought over to the village of Fontana within a week or so,” she said. “The one stipuSpadoni lation on that is that they be brought over as designated funds for rescue squad purposes.” Hayden said equipment and training can be paid for with the funds. Earlier this summer, the rescue squad was absorbed under the leadership of the fire department. A contract for day-time coverage of the village was signed with Paratech at the same time. Petersen The September bill, the first full month of service, totaled $16,085.70. Paratech staffers are in the village from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week. Zoning department hiring In August, Bridget McCarthy resigned her position in the zoning department, which left too much work for the one-man department to do. Zoning Administrator Ron Nyman said he can’t handle the village’s contracts with both Sharon and Walworth without some help. Nyman said if the village discontinues its contract with Sharon, a part-time assistant could fill in McCarthy’s role. The board requested Nyman and Hayden look over the seasonal numbers and budgets and decide if a full-time or part-time replacement was the best solution.

ebrate Epiphany the same day, commemorating the Magi who visited Jesus after his birth.

Woman gets four years for burglary Chaplin caught in township home A 59-year-old Delavan woman was sentenced to four years in prison after she pleaded guilty to a felony burglary charge. Gail A. Chaplin also was sentenced to four years of extended supervision. On Nov. 15, a Walworth Township couple arrived at their home and found their back door pried open and a women inside their house. That woman was later identified as Chaplin, who, in 2005, was convicted of burglary and sentenced to five years of probation. Misdemeanor charges of theft and Chaplin criminal damage to property were dismissed but considered during the sentencing hearing. According to the criminal complaint: When the couple returned home they saw a tan Buick in their driveway and that the back door to their home had been pried open. The man entered his home and saw a female intruder inside. The man told the woman she couldn’t leave until police arrived, but she drove away in the Buick. The homeowners told police two bottles of prescription medication were missing. The couple wrote the license plate number of the Buick, which was later located at the Delavan Piggly Wiggly. When police arrived at the Piggly Wiggly they spoke to Chaplin, who denied entering the residence. However, both homeowners identified her as the intruder in photo line ups.

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September 12, 2013

The Regional News

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GENEVA LAKE WEST

Bay high school cited for ‘high progress’ Phoenix in Delavan only other county school to win award By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net WILLIAMS BAY — In recognition of significantly exceeding educational expectations and meeting achievement and graduation objectives for its students, the high school was recently awarded the state Department of Public Instruction’s Title I School of Recognition Award for the 201314 school year. According to a DPI press release, 167 state schools won the awards this year. But Williams Bay High School was one of just 13 high schools statewide to earn a School of Recognition Award this year. It was also only one of two Walworth County schools to receive that recognition. The other was Phoenix Middle School in the Delavan-Darien School District. “I’ve very proud of our students,” said Dianna Woss, Williams Bay School Board president. “We have a good faculty and great students.” Woss said she is looking forward to trav-

eling to Madison Oct. 8 to accept the award on behalf of the district. Each school will receive a plaque and $500, Woss said. In addition, the district will be given a logo to use on all of its publications and teachers from the district will have the chance to participate in a teacher fellowship program. Woss credited former high school and junior high school principal Barry Butters with working with students and making the award possible for Williams Bay. “He helped to make this award possible,” said Woss. “Everybody in Williams Bay should be proud of the high school,” she added “This is certainly a testament to the hard work our students, pre-K -12 staff and board of education have put in to provide a rigorous academic curriculum for all students,” said Williams Bay School Superintendent Wayne Anderson. Recently hired as superintendent, Anderson said neither he nor William White, the junior and senior high school’s

WHAT’S HAPPENING Bay historical society meets Oct. 17 The recently-formed Williams Bay Historical Society will meet Thursday, Oct. 17, at 7 p.m., at the Williams Bay High School. Everyone who has an interest in history is invited to attend. Check out the Historical Society’s Facebook page under “The Williams Bay History Exhibit” to get a head start on interesting information about Williams Bay. “The time is right,” group member Deb Soplanda said. “The interest is very high and people just keep asking us for more information about Williams Bay’s past.” An interest in the village’s history was kindled during a month-long “History of Williams Bay” exhibit in May. A group of like-minded locals led by village board members Greg Trush and John Grove met in January to create an exhibit about the history of the village. Along the way, they added a Speakers Series which saw standing-room-only crowds and left townspeople looking for more. A Facebook page followed and now the group is set to

become a historical society. Founded in 1836 by a War of 1812 veteran from Massachusetts, Capt. Israel Williams, Williams Bay’s past includes everything from mastodons to movie stars. The village is home to the world-famous Yerkes Observatory, which has the largest refracting telescope anywhere, and the Belfry Theater, the first summer stock company in Wisconsin. The village was also once known as the “Iceboat Capital of the World,” The new historical society plans on bringing these interesting facts to light through an on-going “mini” history exhibit at the Williams Bay Village Hall, another speakers series in the spring and a historical trolley tour of the village tentatively set for the fall of 2014. They also plan to work with the Williams Bay High School History Club to publish “A History of Williams Bay.” First, however, members are needed to help plan and organize these and more great events. Contact Soplanda at dsoplanda@williamsbayschools.org for more information.

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Highway 14/Village critical of plan “The minutes from my meeting with them is all criticism of this idea.” Rasmussen said to change the DOT plan will take “a lot of argument.” “I wouldn’t have a problem with a sign that says no left turn from 3 to 5 p.m. or something,” he said. “But this island is going to be awful for public works, it’s going to be awful for the general public.” Dolores Pophal, a member of the Walworth Task Force a group created to influence the DOT’s plans, asked if Rasmussen supported the highway plan. “It’s the best option,” he said. “Well, the public differs on that,” Pophal said. “We’ve submitted petitions, but you ignored those petitions.” Trustee Kent Johnson said the board has repeatedly told the DOT the village wanted a bypass. “We passed that resolution because of the petition,” Johnson said. “We told the DOT we wanted a bypass. That’s always been the plan.” Rasmussen said the village master plans have included a highway bypass, but the DOT disregarded bypass plans because the option would cost too much. Police bargaining While the village police department has trained and scheduled a full-time police officer when the department lost staff earlier this year, the officer isn’t officially hired. The village board has to

“We told the DOT we wanted a bypass. That’s always been the plan,” Trustee Kent Johnson said. approve all police department hires, and it has yet to approve Hannah Hooper’s hiring. “You’re putting us in a difficult position for negotiations,” Rasmussen said. If the hiring is approved, Hooper can become a member of the police officer union, and she would join the bargaining unit as new contracts are created for 2014. “Right now, she’s not a vote,” Rasmussen said. “She’s going to have vested interests coming to those negotiations.” The current contract includes a pay increase after the first year of employment with the department, and Hooper would be eligible for that pay raise in 2014. Police Chief Chris Severt said she’s only one vote. “If you have three guys out of four saying, wait a minute, you’re going to get the lion’s share of that

money, you think that’s going to go?” Severt asked. “That’s where the whole negotiation thing comes in.” Johnson said the other three union officers want to see raises themselves and would likely vote with Hooper, if negotiations came to that. “They probably don’t want to see that pay table change,” Johnson said. “They’re waiting for their five or 10 year raise. It’s in their interest to keep that table as well.” It’s unclear whether fulltime officers are required to join the union, and Rasmussen said the board needs more clarification. “I don’t think this makes a difference if we sort this out in the next month or something,” Rasmussen said. “I think if we do this, there’s a chance we’ll add one more person to the bargaining unit.”

new principal, had anything to do with the district earning this year’s award. Nonetheless, Anderson said he was proud of the staff and students who won the award for the district. Williams Bay won the recognition award for “high progress.” High progress schools must fall within the top 10 percent of schools experiencing greatest improvement in high school graduation rates and have achievement gaps that are less than three points between student groups or show evidence of reducing those gaps. The award, however, comes with a criterion that is a sobering reality. All award-winning schools receive federal Title I funding to provide services to high numbers or high percentages of economically disadvantaged children. Patrick Gasper, DPI communications officer, said Williams Bay School District has been receiving Title I funding since the 2002-03 school year and has been eligible for the award since then. He said districts with 8 percent of its students coming from families who are at or below the federal

poverty level qualify for the Title I award. Woss said everyone was aware that there was a certain level of poverty in the Williams Bay district. “Our free and reduced lunch programs have been growing,” she said. “The economy presents us with real challenges.” This is the second year Phoenix Middle School was named as a “beating the odds” recognition school by the DPI. Phoenix qualified for the award because it: n Had above-average student achievement in reading and math when compared to similar-sized schools from like-sized districts with similar grade configurations and poverty levels. n Met the state’s test-participation, attendance and dropout goals. n Had been placed in one of the top three school report card categories of “meeting expectations,” “exceeding expectations” or “significantly exceeding expectations.” Phoenix, the only “beating the odds” school in Walworth County, also qualified for the award because the school is in the top 25 percent of Wisconsin schools for the percentage of students receiving federal free and reduced-priced school meals.

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Signs/Some wording changed Signs not yet replaced this year are: n Pier 184 to the west of Athans’ Metal. n Conference Point, Williams Bay. n West of the Lake Geneva Country Club. n Trinke Estates. n Pier 838. n Wrigley Drive and Campbell Street. Taylor said that if residents are aware of the locations of other signs and want them changed they should contact the GLA at genevalakeassoc.org or at PO Box 412, Lake Geneva, 53147. Williams said the new signs are identical to the old signs, except that some of the wording, particularly the wording about bicycle riding, has been changed. Old wording was: “You are invited to walk along the lakeshore path and enjoy the natural beauty of the Geneva Lake shoreline. “You are entering on private property, so please observe the following: “Stay on the lakeshore path or trail. “Keep pets on a leash. “Do not remove plants or other natural materials. “To preserve these private grounds and to protect the environment, “Please do not use bicycles on the path. “Motorized vehicles are not permitted. “Picnicking, swimming, fishing, hunting, fires, sports activities and use of radios are prohibited. The new signs read: “You are invited to walk along the lakeshore path and enjoy the natural beauty of the Geneva Lake shoreline.

“You are entering private property. To preserve these private grounds and protect the environment, please observe the following: “Stay on the lakeshore path or trail. “Keep pets on a leash. “Do not remove plants or other natural materials.” “Bicycles and motorized vehicles are prohibited by municipal ordinance in most areas. “Picnicking, swimming, fishing, hunting, fires, sports activities and use of radios are prohibited.” Taylor said the old signs were made of wood and lasted 10 years or more. The new signs are made of laminated plywood and should last at least as long as the old ones, he said. While riding bikes on the Lake Shore path is prohibited by ordinance in the town of Linn and village of Williams Bay, it is not prohibited in the city of Lake Geneva or the village of Fontana. Those on bikes will find most of the Lake Geneva section of the path wide, paved and friendly to two-wheelers. In fact, Lake Geneva police officers can sometimes be seen patrolling the city’s section of the path on bikes. However, nearly 75 percent of the path is legally closed to bicycling. In the villages and the town of Linn (which rests on both the north and south shore of the lake) the path is not as conducive to bicycling and can be downright dangerous. Taylor said lakeside homeowners in those areas don’t like the ruts in their lawns and gardens caused by bike tires.

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The Regional News

September 12, 2013

WALWORTH COUNTY CRIME REPORTS

Woman pleads guilty to lesser counts A 38-year-old former Sharon woman who had sex with two 15-year-old boys pleaded guilty Aug. 29 to several reduced charges. Rachael A. McCormick, now of East Troy, pleaded guilty to two counts of exposing a child to harmful materials, Class I felonies, and two misdemeanor charges of fourth-degree sexual assault. McCormick was originally charged with two counts of second-degree sexual assault of a child, Class B felonies. She originally

faced up to 120 years imprisonment. Now, with the reduced charges, she faces up to 8.5 years imprisonment. She is scheduled for an Oct. 11 sentencing hearing in front of Judge Phillip Koss. According to the criminal complaint: On Oct. 1, 2012, police spoke with a 15-year-old boy, who is iden-

McCormick

tified in the criminal complaint as Victim 1. Victim 1 told police that he went to McCormick’s residence on Sept. 29, 2012, where she gave him raspberry vodka. The boy told police that he got “drunk” and had sex with McCormick. On Oct. 9, 2012, police and Child Advocacy Coordinator Paula Hocking met with McCormick. McCormick admitted to giving

COURT REPORTS Whitewater man pleads not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect A 50-year-old Whitewater man pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect on Sept. 3 to three felony charges after he allegedly sexually assaulted two young children. Jay E. Zabel, 445 N. Jefferson St., has been charged with first-degree sexual assault, contact with a child under the age of 13; repeated sexual assault of a child and exposing himself in a public area. If convicted of all counts, Zabel faces up to 123 1/2 years imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. According to the criminal complaint: Zabel A Whitewater police detective interviewed Zabel during a child sexual assault investigation. During that interview, Zabel told the detective that he is sexually attracted to children who are between the ages of infant and 3-years-old and that he wants help for this problem. Zabel was the babysitter for the boys he was allegedly molesting. A child identified, as Victim 1 in court reports, is a boy born in 2012, and he was allegedly sexually touched by Zabel while Zabel changed the baby’s diaper. Zabel said this occurred between March and June. Victim 2, a boy that was born in 2010, was also allegedly molested by Zabel. When being interviewed by the detective, Zabel told police about the sexual assaults. Victim 3, who was born in 2008, walked in on Zabel while he was masturbating in an unlocked bathroom. Zabel also told police that he was purchasing diapers for two different families, and trading the new diapers for soiled ones. Zabel told police he found soiled diapers sexually gratifying.

Fontana man gets probation for pot A 22-year-old Fontana man was sentenced Aug. 28 to three years of probation after pleading guilty to marijuana and bail jumping charges. Michael A. Spadoni, 540 Oak St., pleaded guilty May 8 to two counts of felony bail jumping and one count of possession of marijuana, as a second or subsequent offense. As a condition of his probation, Spadoni must spend nine months in the jail with work-release privileges for treatment, employment and school. An additional felony charge of possession of marijuana, as a second or subsequent offense, was dismissed but read into the record. According to the criminal complaint on the bail jumping charge: On May 16 at 2:20 a.m. police were dispatched to a report of a man attempting to enter Denny K’s. Police found a male matching the description of the suspect sitting on the steps of TNT Signs. When the officer approached the suspect, the man took out keys and attempted to enter the business. Spadoni told the officer that he had been at the “The Boar,” which is a nearby bar. A portable Breathalyzer test showed that Spadoni’s blood alcohol level was 0.236. Spadoni’s bond prohibited him from consuming alcohol. According to the criminal complaint on the marijuana charge: On Dec. 5, 7:19 a.m. officer searched a home on

Peck Street in the city of Whitewater. Spadoni and another man were sitting on couches in the living room. When the officers entered, it appeared both men had just awakened. Inside of the home police found marijuana, a marijuana grinder, a vaporizer and a bong. Police also located a Alprazolam pill inside of a backpack with items identifying Spadoni as the owner. According to the criminal complaint on the original charge: On March 17, at about 10:49 a.m., a city of Whitewater detective entered a residence on Starin Road. The detective asked to enter the residence after smelling marijuana. One of the people inside the residence was Spadoni. Inside of Spadoni’s pocket, police found a joint. In November 2010, Spadoni pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of resisting an officer or obstructing an officer, possession of marijuana and disorderly conduct.

Man guilty of marijuana charge A 29-year-old town of Geneva man pleaded guilty Aug. 28 to three misdemeanor counts of possession of marijuana. Ryan M. Foley, N2516 Bublitz Road, was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to serve 12 months in jail with work-release privileges. As a condition of his probation, Foley must also complete 400 hours of community service, pay a $1,000 fine and reimburse the Walworth County Drug Unit for $750 in buy money. Foley was originally charged with three counts of delivering marijuana. According to the criminal complaint: Foley allegedly sold marijuana to a police informant on March 22, April 9 and 18.

Man allegedly attacked woman outside of her Whitewater apartment A Glenwood, Ill., man is accused of attacking a woman on Aug. 29 outside of her Whitewater apartment. DeShawn L. Washington, 23, has been charged with felony false imprisonment and misdemeanor counts of battery and disorderly conduct. If convicted, Washington faces up to seven years imprisonment and $21,000 in fines. Washington is being held in custody in lieu of a $10,000 cash bond. According to the criminal complaint: A 21-year-old woman reported to police that at 3:02 a.m. she was walking home from the bar when she noticed a man was following her. When the woman arrived at her apartment, she didn’t have her keys and began to ring the doorbell. The man walked up behind her and asked to use her phone. After the woman refused to let the man use her phone, he threatened her, grabbed her and pulled her away from the door. The woman began to scream and rang a neighbor’s door bell. The struggle continued until a neighbor came outside and the man ran away. The woman identified Washington as her attacker in a photo lineup.

Man faces charges for officer’s injury A 21-year-old Pell Lake man faces a felony charge after he allegedly injured a police officer while resisting arrest. Christopher A. George, W860 Juneau Road, has been charged with felony resisting an officer causing a soft tissue injury. He also faces misdemeanor charges of battery and disorderly conduct. All of the charges have been elevated to a repeater status because, in October 2010, George was convicted of two misdemeanor counts of theft. If convicted of the charges, George faces up to 12 years imprisonment and $21,000 in fines. According to the criminal complaint: On Aug. 15, at 4:02 p.m., police responded to a report that George attacked a man in the village of Bloomfield. At 7:58 p.m., police went to George’s home to arrest him. George ran from police and as the officer attempted to grab George’s T-shirt she felt a pop in her knee. To stop George the officer used her stun gun. The officer was diagnosed with a torn meniscus in her right knee, which will require surgery.

Man allegedly grew pot on back porch

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A 45-year-old Lake Geneva man is accused of growing marijuana on the back porch of his apartment. Eric D. Collins, 1163 Wells St., No. 5, has been charged with manufacturing marijuana near a school. If convicted of the felony charge, Collins faces up to 11 years imprisonment and $10,000 in fines. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of possession of drug paraphernalia. According to the criminal complaint: On July 17, police raided Collins’ apartment. Collins admitted that he owned and took care of the eight marijuana plants on the back porch. Collins’ apartment is located 451 feet away from Badger High School.

alcohol to Victim 1, but said she was very intoxicated and didn’t remember having sex with him. However, she said she remembered having sex with another 15-year-old boy, who is identified as Victim 2 in the criminal complaint. On Oct. 11, 2012, Victim 2 told police that he had sex with McCormick on Sept. 29. Victim 2 also told police that Victim 1 asked McCormick if he could have sex with her, and she agreed.

LAKE GENEVA POLICE Aug .14 10:17 a.m.: Officers responded to an accident on Wrigley Drive at Baker Street. Trenton S. Bobula, 18, Genoa City, was cited for hit and run-an unattended vehicle.

Aug. 20 9:18 p.m.: Officers went to the 900 block of Grant Street for a report of a disturbance. Rachael Ann Derke, 31, Lake Geneva, was cited for disorderly conduct and damage to property.

Aug. 23 1:48 a.m.: Officers went to the 100 block of Broad Street for a report of a fight. Michael J. Bolser, 28, Mukwonago, was cited for disorderly conduct. 11:14 p.m.: While on patrol, an officer saw a man urinating in the 100 block of Center Street. Charles Jacob Arbogast, 40, Gurnee, Ill, was cited for disorderly conduct - public urination, possession of THC and possession of drug paraphernalia. 11:35 p.m.: Officers went to the 100 block of Center Street for a report of a fight. Bret James Kehl, 36, Crystal Lake, Ill, a citation for disorderly conduct - involved in a fight.

Aug. 24 10:39 p.m.: While on patrol in the 700 block of Wells Street an officer saw two people who appeared to be having an argument. Jonathan Taylor Lord, 25, Johnsburg, Ill., was cited for possession of THC.

Aug. 25 1:45 a.m.: Officers went to the 700 block of West Main Street for a report of a fight. Matthew Bruno Matelis, 35, Bloomingdale, Ill., was cited for disorderly conduct involved in a fight.

LINN POLICE REPORTS Town of Linn police recently reported the following traffic accidents. The ages of those involved were not reported. n Two people received citations after a traffic stop Aug. 17 at 3 a.m. Jeremy Schlesner, no age or address reported, was cited for second-offense operating after suspension. Heather Scott, also no age or address reported, was cited for possession of a controlled substance. Police pulled over the vehicle being driven by Schlesner after discovering the co-owner of the vehicle had a suspended license. Scott gave officers permission to search the vehicle, and they reportedly found marijuana. n Rayce Wadsworth, of Burlington, was arrested Aug. 3 at 5 p.m. on four counts of theft. He is being charged with taking cash from a town of Linn home. The stolen money was recovered. n A 2004 tan Chevrolet Cavalier rolled onto its passenger’s side Aug. 21 at 3:20 p.m. after a one-vehicle accident on State Line Road, a half-mile east of Highfield Drive. Omar Ocampo, of Lake Geneva, was driving the vehicle when the steering locked up and the car entered a ditch. The vehicle was towed from the scene. n Robert Kelly, Chicago, was cited for inattentive driving Aug. 19 at 7:05 p.m. after a two-vehicle accident on Highway B. Kelly was driving a 2005 silver Pontiac G6 east on Highway B, slowing to stop behind a 2006 red Toyota being driven by Kenneth Schaid, Hebron, Ill. Kelly told police he looked to his left. When he looked forward again, he could not stop and struck the Toyota. Both vehicles sustained minor damage. n A 1994 white Grand Cherokee struck a tree Aug. 29 at 4:25 p.m. on Snake Road, near Folly Lane. Servando Perez Jr., of Sharon, was driving west on Snake Road when the steering malfunctioned. The passenger’s side of the vehicle struck a tree that was about 4 feet off the road.

GENOA CITY POLICE REPORTS Village of Genoa City police reported the following incidents: n Kelsy A. Pieper, 21, South Elgin, Ill., received four citations after a traffic stop Aug. 24 at 9:47 p.m. on Wild Rose Road at Steven Court. She was cited for operating while intoxicated, driving without insurance, driving without ID and no tail lights at night. n Police cited two people for possession of marijuana during a traffic stop Aug. 6 at 8:50 p.m. on Walworth Street at Sterling Parkway. Dylan S. Dorfler, 18, 375 Parker Drive, Apt. D, Genoa City, and Matthew B. Kot, 19, Richmond, Ill., received the citations. They were pulled over because their vehicle had a loud exhaust, police stated. n A fire occurred Aug. 13 at 3:34 a.m. at Models Plus Inc., 267 Wild Rose Road. According to police, the machines inside the business caught fire overnight. The fires were extinguished upon police arrival. n Police are investigating the theft of a Sony digital camcorder worth about $699 from a Wisconsin Street residence. It was reported Aug. 25 at 6:15 p.m. n A 32-year-old Genoa City man was arrested for domestic violence-disorderly conduct Aug. 19 at 8:47 p.m. n Someone slashed the tires on a Genoa City police officer’s personal vehicle Aug. 9, prior to 2:45 a.m. The vehicle was parked at the police department, 715 Walworth St.


September 12, 2013

AROUND THE COUNTY

The Regional News

PUBLIC NOTICES

LG Wine Festival

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COUNTY WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 13PR151 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ALYCE LOTTIG BRITTON PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth 56-1936 and date of death 7-11-2013, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of W3517 County Rd. B, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is December 12, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Judicial Center, 1800 Cty Rd. NN, P.O. Box 1001, Elkhorn, Wisconsin 53121 Room 2085. Wendy A. Esch Deputy Probate Registrar September 5, 2012 Attorney Richard P. Rasmussen P.O. Box 250 Walworth, WI 53184 262-275-5482 Bar Number 1016544 Sept. 12, 19, 26, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 2013PR141 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DANIEL RYAN GREEN D.O.D.: 09/12/2011 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth September 10, 1973 and date of death Sept. 12, 2011, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 453 North Lake Shore Drive, Fontana, WI 53125. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 26, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Judicial Center-Probate, 1800 Cty Trk NN, PO Box 1001, Room 2085, Elkhorn, Wisconsin 53121. Elizabeth Cheverie Deputy Probate Registrar August 19, 2013 Attorney John K. Bartosz 1624 Hobbs Drive, Suite 1 Delavan, WI 53115 414-378-4419 Bar Number: 1030688 Sept. 5, 12, 19, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 2013PR144 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Terry H. Eisenbach Deceased PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for inforaml administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth August 10, 1942 and date of death March 1, 2012, was domiciled in Walworth County7, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of W4052 Whittier Rd., Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent5’s estate is November 29, 2013. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Judicial Center-Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 Countty Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085, 531211001. Elizabeth Cheverie Deputy Probate Registrar August 22, 2013 Tammy S. Schiesl 1624 Richter Dr. Batavia, IL 60510 630-482-9357 Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 12 CV 01000 Case Code No. 30404 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, INC. 2006-HE3, ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-HE3

NOTICE OF SALE OF TIME-SHARE ESTATES UNDER CHAPTER 707 OF THE WISCONSIN STATUTES

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JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

TRICIA RACHFORD, Woodstock, Ill., and Paul Vermett, Marengo, Ill., taste Kenwood Wine at the Lake Geneva Wine Festival held at Lake Lawn Resort on Sept. 7.

Lake Lawn hosting live radio theater DELAVAN — The WGTD Radio Theater will broadcast their live program from Lake Lawn Resort at 11:15 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 14. Broadcast throughout Kenosha, Racine and Walworth counties on 91.1 FM, the show will honor comedian Jack Benny with an original set modeled after his classic radio show, complete with live music and sound effects. Lake Lawn encourages guests to attend as part of the in-studio audience for an inside look, as well as a breakfast buffet before the show. “We’re thrilled to bring the WGTD Radio Theater to Lake Lawn,” said Lake Lawn Resort General Manager Dave Sekeres. The live broadcast at Lake Lawn will include a new installment of the “The New Jack Benny Show” entitled “We’re Working Twice,” a banter-filled performance detailing protagonist Jack Benny’s stay at Lake Lawn, as well as the next episode of the ongoing series “It’s the Professor.” The show will be brought to life by 10 talented actors and topped with live and recorded sound effects, as well as bluesy tunes by “Sweet Bev” Perron, performed during show breaks. The Frontier Restaurant will host a breakfast buffet prior to the show at 9:30 a.m. Fans can then catch a sneak preview during a pre-show warm-up at 10:30 a.m. as the band gets settled, actors run through scripts and the crew sets up. The live broadcast will begin at 11:15 a.m. and lasts approximately 45 minutes. Tickets for both the pre-show breakfast and live broadcast are $20, while tickets for the show alone are $10. Reservations are encouraged as space is limited. Call (800)3385253 for more information or to purchase tickets.

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 13CV00803 In the matter of the name change of: HERMAN DeWAYNE EGLY, JR. By Petitioner DeWayne Egly NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above from Herman DeWayne Egly, Jr. to DeWayne Egly. Birth Certificate: Herman DeWayne Egly, Jr. IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of Wisconsin before the Hon. Judge Phillip A. Koss at Walworth Co. Judicial Center, 1800 County Road NN, Elkhorn, WI 53121 on September 30, 2013 at 8:30 A.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News a newspaper published in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin. If you require reasonable acommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 262-741-7012 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: Hon. Phillip A. Koss Circuit Court Judge August 25, 2013 Sept. 5, 12, 19, 2013

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LEGAL NOTICES MUST BE PLACED BY 12 P.M. MONDAY

TO APPEAR IN THE

UPCOMING ISSUE

contact Sue at 262-248-4444 sue@lakegenevanews.net

to place a listing or for more information

Plaintiff Vs. STEVEN FIENE; JENNIFER L. HERNANDEZ; ALLISON FIENE; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR PREMIER MORTGAGE FUNDING; Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 14, 2013, in the amount of $138,315.67, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 26, 2013 at 10:00 am TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 Property description: LOT THREE (3) IN BLOCK TWO (2) IN PASSAGE, ARAM & DOWNIE’S ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE (NOW CITY) OF DELAVAN, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN. Tax Key No.: XP 00019 Property Address: 211 S. 4TH ST., DELAVAN, WISCONSIN 53115 Kimberly W. Hibbard State Bar No. 1090800 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9711 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, 2013

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PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that certain time-share estates will be sold on October 19, 2013, at 8:00 a.m. at the law offices of Godfrey, Leibsle, Blackbourn & Howarth, S.C., 354 Seymour Ct., Elkhorn, WI, by virtue of the Declaration of Condominium for Grand Geneva Vacation Condominiums, whose principal office is located at 7036 Grand Geneva Way, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 53147, and Chapter 707 of the Wisconsin Statutes establishing a lien for failure to pay assessments on the timeshare estates. The Notices of Sale of the time-share estates to be sold at public auction, together with specific information relating to the time-share owners, the time-share estates, and the terms of sale, is posted on the Internet at the following website: www.ggvctimesharesales.com Sept. 12, 19, 26, 2013

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WILLIAMS BAY PUBLIC NOTICES 00 11 13 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY, WISCONSIN 1. Time and Place of Opening Bids. Sealed proposals for the construction of the Phase 1A Bike Path Project for the Village of Williams Bay, Walworth County, Wisconsin, will be received at the Village Office, 250 Williams Street, Williams Bay, Wisconsin 53191, Attention: Jacqueline Hopkins, Village Clerk, until 10:00 A.M., September 19, 2013, and at that time will be publicly opened and the total bid price read aloud. 2. Description of Work. The proposed construction consists of the following: Construction of approximately 2100 lineal feet of 8-foot wide stone path, including tree removal, erosion control, woodland restoration, sidewalk removal and subgrade replacement, and other miscellaneous items of work. This project will be funded by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources through the Recreational Trails Program and Acquisition and Development of Local Parks Program. 3. Information for Bidders. All pertinent documents may be examined at the Village Office, 250 Williams Street, Williams Bay, WI 53191 or at the office of Baxter & Woodman, Inc., Consulting Engineers, 256 South Pine Street, Burlington, Wisconsin 53105. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the Engineers, Baxter & Woodman, Inc., upon a non-refundable

Please turn to page 6

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6B

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES WILLIAMS BAY PUBLIC NOTICES

GENOA CITY PUBLIC NOTICES

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

Continued from page 5

work shall be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond in the full amount of the contract price. On contracts of $30,000 or more, Prime Contractor(s) shall furnish listing of all subcontractors and suppliers performing labor and supplying materials under the Contract that individually have a total value of $1,000 or more. Failure to list subcontractors or suppliers may be cause for rejection of the Bid. Owner reserves the right to postpone the award of the Contract for a period not exceeding 45 days from the date of bid opening. Bids shall remain firm for that period of time. The Owner further reserves the right to retain the security deposits of the 3 lowest Bidders during that time. This advertisement is published by authority of the Village of Genoa City, September 12 and September 19, 2013.

Cave Irrevocable Trust, and Bear Cave Residence Trust, Plaintiffs, v. Walworth County Board of Adjustment and Walworth County Department of Land Use and Resource Management, Defendants; b) Notice of Claim received from Missy Frautschy; c) Notice of Claim received from Howard Thiel; d) Notice of Claim received from Sandra Walter (To be referred to the Executive Committee) 3. Correspondence from County Administrator regarding an extension of the County’s option to purchase the Clark property in the Town of Lyons for the purpose of establishing a park. (It is anticipated that a motion will be made pursuant to Section 265(c)(1) of the Code of Ordinances and that the resolution attached to the above-stated correspondence will be acted on immediately.) 4. Request for a Public Hearing in regard to the potential revocation of conditional use permit approvals for Units 11 and 174 of the Willow Run Condominium Association (To be referred to the County Zoning Agency) 5. Correspondence received from the Walworth County Fair Office regarding a request for the Fairest of the Fair Abigail Jensen to make a presentation to the County Board (To be placed on file) (It is anticipated that the County Board will suspend its rules and consider the request and permit the Fairest of the Fair to make a short presentation at tonight’s meeting) 6. Eau Claire County Resolution No. 13-14/038 – Support of Clean Energy Choice for Wisconsin (To be referred to the Executive Committee) 7. Brown County Resolution In Favor of Freezing Renewable Energy Requirements at the 2011 Level (To be referred to the Executive Committee) 8. Correspondence from Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission in regard to their Calendar Year 2014 Budget (To be referred to the Finance Committee) 9. Correspondence from the Wisconsin Historical Society in regard to the Whitewater Passenger Depot being entered in the National Register of Historic Places and the State Register of Historic Places (To be placed on file) 10. Correspondence from State Representative Andy Jorgensen acknowledging receipt of Walworth County resolutions (To be placed on file) 11. Report of the County Clerk Regarding Communications Received by the Board and Recommended to be Placed on File There was none. 12. Report of the County Clerk Regarding Communications Received by the Board After the Agenda Mailing Correspondence from County Administrator regarding an extension of the County’s option to purchase the Clark property in the Town of Lyons for the purpose of establishing a park (It is anticipated that a motion will be made pursuant to Section 265(c)(1) of the Code of Ordinances and that the resolution attached to the above-stated correspondence will be acted on immediately.) Ordinance No. 791-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the Creation of a Treatment Court Coordinator Position in the Clerk of Courts Office – Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) Ordinance No. 796-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the 2013-14 Lakeland School Staffing Plan – Vote Required: Majority (The Human Resources Committee and the Children with Disabilities Education Board will each consider this item at a special meeting prior to the July 9, 2013 County Board meeting.) Ordinance No. 797-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Staffing Changes at the Lakeland Health Care Center – Vote Required: Majority (The Human Resources Committee will consider this item at a special meeting prior to the July 9, 2013 County Board meeting.) Resolution No. 36-07/13 – Opposing Legislative Efforts to Remove Local Control of the Statewide 911 System – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) Resolution No. 40-07/13 – Endorsing the Regional Housing Plan for the Year 2035 as Set Forth in SEWRPC Planning Report No. 54 – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 4-1) Resolution No. 41-07/13 – Accepting the Wisconsin Trauma Project Grant – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Health and Human Services Board 7-1) Resolution No. 42-07/13 – Approving Modifications to Walworth County’s SelfFunded Health Insurance Plan – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) Resolution No. 43-07/13 – Adopting 2014 Pay Ranges for Certain Hourly Employees and Salaried Exempt Employees – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) Notice of Claim received from Joe Marcin – To be referred to the Executive Committee Barron County Resolution No. 201329 – Resolution Supporting Annual WCA Convention in the Wisconsin Dells – To be referred to the Executive Committee Winnebago County Resolution No. 22-52013 – Support an Amendment to § 706.05, Wis. Stats, to Require Recording of Mortgage Assignments (was previously referred to the Executive Committee) – To be placed on file Walworth County Aging & Disability Resource Center News, July 2013 13. Report of the County Clerk Regarding Zoning Petitions (To be referred to the County Zoning Agency) Citizens Bank of Mukwonago, Douglas R. Bruins – President, Lafayette Township. Rezone 3.07 acres of B-5 Planned Commercial Recreational Business District to A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District William M. & Lorraine A. Norem, Lafayette Township. Rezone 10.5 acres of R-5 Planned Residential Development District and A-2 Agricultural District to A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District Mark & Kathy Gorecki, Sugar Creek Township. Rezone 1.48 acres of A-1 Prime Agricultural District and A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District to A-4 Agricultural Related Manufacturing, Warehousing and Marketing District J&J Fabricating Real Estate LLC, Jeff Reed – Owner/Applicant, Linn Township. Rezone .65 acres of R-1 Single Family Residential District to M-1 Industrial District Eugene & Donna Frodl, Whitewater Township. Rezone 40.33 acres of M-3 Mineral Extraction District to 34.90 acres of A-1 Prime Agricultural District and 5.43 acres of A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District Vice-Chair Grant stated that with

regard to Item 3, Correspondence from County Administrator regarding an extension of the County’s option to purchase the Clark property in the Town of Lyons for the purpose of establishing a park, he made a motion pursuant to Section 2-65(c)(1) of the Code of Ordinances that Resolution No. 4407/13 attached to said correspondence be acted on immediately. Seconded by Supervisor Weber. Motion carried. ViceChair Grant offered a motion, seconded by Supervisor Weber, to approve Resolution No. 44-07/13. Bretl stated the option to purchase will expire in August and there has been no indication from the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources regarding the stewardship grant. He also stated they are short of the vote necessary to acquire the property even if received the stewardship grant as it is an unbudgeted item and requires a two-thirds vote. He said this resolution authorizes staff to obtain an extension of the option under the original terms for the time stated. Supervisor Kilkenny stated the option price has already been paid and there is no additional consideration. Supervisor Redenius asked if the money for the park will be put in the 2014 budget. Bretl stated it is the county board’s decision as to what is put in the 2014 budget and there is a different vote requirement for the budget. A roll call vote was taken. Total votes: 11. Ayes: 7 – Brellenthin, Grant, Kilkenny, Schaefer, Schiefelbein, Weber, and Russell; Noes: 4 – Brandl, Monroe, Redenius, and Stacey; Absent: 0. Resolution No. 44-07/13 was approved by roll call vote. Unfinished Business New Business Reports of Standing Committees County Zoning Agency Report of Proposed Zoning Amendments 1. David A. Hernandez and Tereasa Surratt (Anthony Colletti – Applicant), Section 2, Sugar Creek Township. Rezone 3.12 acres of R-1 to P-1 – Approved: 7-0 (June 20, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) 2. Adam Friemoth and Donald Barker, Section 12, Lafayette Township. Rezone 5.28 acres of A-2 to A-1 and 5.28 acres of A-1 to A-2 – Approved: 7-0 (June 20, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) On motion by Supervisor Stacey, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Items 1 and 2 under County Zoning Agency Report of Proposed Zoning Amendments were approved as recommended by the County Zoning Agency. Executive Committee 1. Ord. No. 794-07/13 – Amending Section 2-200 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Establishing Terms for Certain Members of the Land Information Advisory Council – Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 2. Ord. No. 795-07/13 – Amending Sections 2-32 and 2-154 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Duties and Responsibilities of the County Board – Vote Required: Twothirds (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 3. Res. No. 36-07/13 – Opposing Legislative Efforts to Remove Local Control of the Statewide 911 System – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 4. Res. No. 37-07/13 – Supporting an Amendment to State Law to Permit a Multi-Vendor Student Information System for Wisconsin School Districts – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 5. Res. No. 38-07/13 – Supporting Efforts to Maintain the TaxExempt Status of Municipal Bonds – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 6. Res. No. 39-07/13 – Recognizing Marilyn Putz for Her Service to Walworth County – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 7. Res. No. 40-07/13 – Endorsing the Regional Housing Plan for the Year 2035 as Set Forth in SEWRPC Planning Report No. 54 – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 4-1) Supervisor Weber offered a motion, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, to approve Item 1, Ordinance No. 794-07/13. On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 79407/13 was approved by unanimous consent. Supervisor Weber offered a motion, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, to approve Item 2, Ordinance No. 795-07/13. On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 79507/13 was approved by unanimous consent. On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, Item 3, Resolution No. 36-07/13; Item 4, Resolution No. 37-07/13; Item 5, Resolution No. 3807/13; and Item 7, Resolution No. 40-07/13; were approved by voice vote. Supervisor Schiefelbein requested his vote to be recorded as “No” for Item #7, Resolution No. 40-07/13. Item 6, Resolution No. 39-07/13, was acted on earlier in the meeting. Health and Human Services Board 1. Res. No. 41-07/13 – Accepting the Wisconsin Trauma Project Grant – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Health and Human Services Board 7-1) On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, Resolution No. 41-07/13 was approved by voice vote. Human Resources Committee 1. Ord. No. 787-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the Elimination of Contracts and the Creation of Positions in Health & Human Services – Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 2. Ord. No. 788-07/13 – Amending Section 15-359 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Special Pay Premiums for Certain LHCC Employees – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 3. Ord. No. 789-07/13 – Amending Section 15-337 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Reinstatement of Pay and Benefits for Employees Reinstated from Layoff – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 4. Ord. No. 790-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the Reclassification of a Property Tax Specialist to an Account Clerk IV in the Treasurer’s Office – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 5. Ord. No. 791-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the Creation of a Treatment Court Coordinator Position in the Clerk of Courts Office – Vote Required: Two-thirds (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 6. Ord. No. 792-07/13 –

Amending Section 15-324 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the Family Court Commissioner Salary – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 7. Ord. No. 793-07/13 – Amending Sections 15-6 and 15-810 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Position Titles in Information Technology – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 8. Ord. No. 796-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to the 2013-14 Lakeland School Staffing Plan – Vote Required: Majority (The Human Resources Committee and the Children with Disabilities Education Board each considered this item at a special meeting prior to the July 9, 2013 County Board meeting and it was recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0 and the Children with Disabilities Education Board 5-0) 9. Ord. No. 797-07/13 – Amending Section 15-17 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances Relating to Staffing Changes at the Lakeland Health Care Center – Vote Required: Majority (The Human Resources Committee considered this item at a special meeting prior to the July 9, 2013 County Board meeting and it was recommended 5-0) 10. Res. No. 42-07/13 – Approving Modifications to Walworth County’s SelfFunded Health Insurance Plan – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) 11. Res. No. 43-07/13 – Adopting 2014 Pay Ranges for Certain Hourly Employees and Salaried Exempt Employees – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0) Vice-Chair Grant offered a motion, seconded by Supervisor Weber, to approve Item 1, Ordinance No. 787-07/13. On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 78707/13 was approved by unanimous consent. On motion by Supervisor Monroe, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, Item 2, Ordinance No. 788-07/13; Item 3, Ordinance No. 789-07/13; and Item 4, Ordinance No. 790-07/13; were approved by voice vote. Vice-Chair Grant offered a motion, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, to approve Item 5, Ordinance No. 791-07/13. On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Ordinance No. 79107/13 was approved by unanimous consent. On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Supervisor Monroe, Item 6, Ordinance No. 792-07/13; Item 7, Ordinance No. 793-07/13; and Item 8, Ordinance No. 796-07/13; were approved by voice vote. Tracy Moate, Director of Special Education, stated they have five .80 FTE positions and one .50 FTE position that are being upgraded to 1.0 FTE and they will now have health care coverage provided to them. She said this has been done with a costs savings due to two district positions retiring. On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, Item 9, Ordinance No. 797-07/13, was approved by voice vote. Bernadette Janiszewski, Nursing Home Administrator, stated the Affordable Care Act affects their facility as an employer and as a health care provider. She said that long term care nursing homes now only admit residents of high acuity level and the federal government wants them to employ more RNs and fewer LPNs. She stated they have two employees that are retiring, which is allowing them to take two .50 positions and create 1.0 FTE. She said they also have an LPN that will be retiring, and they will turn that into an RN position. She stated this does not change their total FTE and has a savings of approximately $24,000 for this year. She said it adds an additional expense of approximately $14,000 for 2014; however, this money is made up because they have increased their Medicare Part A admissions, which is their biggest source of revenue. Supervisor Schiefelbein asked if there is an incentive to employ more RNs and fewer LPNs. Ms. Janiszewski said they can continue to admit the rehab patients to the Medicare Unit and that requires more RN coverage, which is their biggest source of revenue. She also said it would hurt to lose their five-star rating as a nursing home. She stated for the last two calendar quarters they have received a two-star rating in RN coverage and they would like to bring this up before the end of the year. Vice-Chair Grant offered a substitute motion, seconded by Supervisor Redenius, to apply for the State Health Insurance Plan rather than approving Resolution No. 4207/13. Vice-Chair Grant stated that by moving to the State Health Plan, it would save over $3 million in county health insurance premiums. A roll call vote was taken. Total votes: 11. Ayes: 3 – Grant, Redenius, and Stacey; Noes: 8 – Brandl, Brellenthin, Kilkenny, Monroe, Schaefer, Schiefelbein, Weber, and Russell; Absent: 0. Motion failed. Chair Russell stated that Resolution No. 42-07/13 was modified at the Human Resources Committee and Exhibit 2 was approved by the Human Resources Committee. Bretl referred to Exhibit 2 attached to Resolution No. 42-07/13. He said Tier 2 applies to deputies and new hires, and Tier 1 applies to employees hired prior to January 1, 2012. He stated this resolution makes modifications to both tiers of the county’s health plan, which includes significant changes to the deductibles and out of pocket maximums. He also stated Tier 2 becomes an HSA eligible plan. He said the purpose is to assist the county in achieving its third year of a tax levy freeze as mandated by the state. He stated he thought employees have largely been responsible for meeting that freeze with the majority of the workforce paying into their Wisconsin retirement. He said this plan modification looks to another group to assist in the county’s goal and that group being those employees who do not contribute to the Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS). He stated the employees who do not pay the employee share towards WRS will be in Tier 2 and there would be no county contribution to the HSA. He said the employees who are paying the employee share of their pension or for those who do not participate in WRS, which includes county board supervisors whom are eligible to participate in the county’s health plan, are able to choose between Tier 1 and Tier 2. He said if those employees select Tier 2, the county would make an annual contribution to their HSA, which consists of $750 for single and $1500 for family. This county contribution would be done on a pro-rated basis so the individual would not have an incentive to take the money and then leave county employment. He also said these employees would have the opportunity to move back and forth between the plans during open enrollment. He stated the overall savings for 2014 is $998,021. He said that since the mid-1990s, county board supervisors have paid the full premium as there is no county subsidy for their

participation in the county’s health plan. Supervisor Kilkenny commended ViceChair Grant for bringing forward the information for the board to examine as it gave them the opportunity to look at all options. On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Item 11, Resolution No. 42-07/13 was approved by voice vote. Supervisors Grant, Redenius, and Stacey requested that their votes be recorded as “No”. On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, Item 11, Resolution No. 43-07/13, was approved by voice vote. Park Committee 1. Res. No. 35-07/13 – Recognizing and Commending Jacob Dertz on his Completion of an Eagle Scout Service Project at Natureland Park – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Park Committee 5-0) Resolution No. 35-07/13 was acted on earlier in the meeting. Report of Special Committees There was none. Comment Period by Members of the Public Concerning Items Not on the Agenda There was none. Chairperson’s Report Chair Russell stated that Suzi Hagstrom, Labor/Employee Relations Director, has accepted a new position in the state of Washington, and wished her well. Bretl stated they are trying to not have a regular county board meeting or committee meetings in August. He said the plan is to have a quick county board meeting prior to the August 15, 2013 County Zoning Agency meeting. He also said they are trying to limit the meeting to zoning items and they will need a quorum for the meeting. He encouraged Supervisors to take advantage of the break. Chair Russell reminded Supervisors of the next regular county board meeting, which is scheduled for Thursday, September 5, 2013. Adjournment On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Supervisor Kilkenny, the meeting was adjourned at 7:10 p.m.

payment of $50.00 per set Documents can only be purchased at the Burlington, Wisconsin office of Baxter & Woodman, Inc. In accordance with Wisconsin Statutes 66.0903, not less than the prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) shall be paid to all laborers, workmen and mechanics performing work under this contract. All Bids must be accompanied by a Bidder’s bond, certified check, bank cashier’s check or bank draft payable to the Village of Williams Bay for ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the Bid as provided in the Bidder Instructions. 4. Rejection of Bids. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any or all Bids and to waive technicalities. Unless the Bids are rejected for good cause, award of contract shall be made to the lowest responsible and responsive Bidder. Dated at Williams Bay, Wisconsin this 19th day of August, 2013. John P. Marra, President Jacqueline Hopkins, Clerk END OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sept. 5 & 12, 2013

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00 11 13 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY, WISCONSIN 1. Time and Place of Opening Bids. Sealed proposals for the construction of the Well 1 Pump Replacement for the Village of Williams Bay, Walworth County, Wisconsin, will be received at the Village Office, 250 Williams Street, Williams Bay, Wisconsin 53191, Attention: Jacqueline Hopkins, Village Clerk, until 10:00 A.M., September 19, 2013, and at that time will be publicly opened and the total bid price read aloud. 2. Description of Work. The proposed construction consists of the following: Remove existing pump and discharge piping and install a new submersible well pump, and other miscellaneous items of work. 3. Information for Bidders. All pertinent documents may be examined at the Village Office, 250 Williams Street, Williams Bay, WI 53191 or at the office of Baxter & Woodman, Inc., Consulting Engineers, 256 South Pine Street, Burlington, Wisconsin 53105. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the Engineers, Baxter & Woodman, Inc., upon a non-refundable payment of $50.00 per set Documents can only be purchased at the Burlington, Wisconsin office of Baxter & Woodman, Inc. In accordance with Wisconsin Statutes 66.0903, not less than the prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) shall be paid to all laborers, workmen and mechanics performing work under this contract. All Bids must be accompanied by a Bidder’s bond, certified check, bank cashier’s check or bank draft payable to the Village of Williams Bay for ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the Bid as provided in the Bidder Instructions. 4. Rejection of Bids. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any or all Bids and to waive technicalities. Unless the Bids are rejected for good cause, award of contract shall be made to the lowest responsible and responsive Bidder. Dated at Williams Bay, Wisconsin this 19th day of August, 2013. John P. Marra, President Jacqueline Hopkins, Clerk END OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sept. 5 & 12, 2013 WNAXLP

GENOA CITY PUBLIC NOTICES ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS PUBLIC WORKS STORAGE GARAGE VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN The Village of Genoa City will accept sealed bids for the Public Works Storage Garage Project until 10:00 A.M., Thursday, September 26, 2013 at the office of the Village Clerk, Village of Genoa City, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa City, WI 53128. At that time, Village officials will publicly open and read aloud the bids. Normal office hours are 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS are on file and open for inspection during normal business hours at the following locations: R.A. Smith National, Inc. at 16745 West Bluemound Road, Suite 200, Brookfield, WI 53005 and the Village of Genoa City, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa City, WI 53128. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained ONLY from QuestCDN. Access the QuestCDN ftp site at www.rasmithnational.com/Questcdn/bids.htm to view and download bid information and documents after September 12, 2013, for a non-refundable fee of $20.00. Input QuestCDN eBidDoc No. 2906129 on the website’s Project Search page. No password is required. Contact QuestCDN.com at 952233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for assistance in downloading and working with the digital documents. The Project consists of one prime Contract and is identified as follows: Public Works Storage Garage, complete including erosion control, grading, site work, utilities (gas, electric, water, drain), concrete foundation, concrete floor, overhead doors, personnel doors, piping, electrical, heaters, concrete paving, gravel drive, accessories, cleanup and restoration. – One Lump Sum. The Contract letting shall be subject to the provisions of Sections 61.54, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. Bids shall be submitted on the bid form provided and all blanks must be filled in for the bid to be accepted. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 45 days from the date of the bid opening. Bids shall be accompanied by Bid Security in the form of a Bid Bond, certified check, or cashiers check made payable to the Owner in an amount of 5 percent of the Bidder’s maximum Bid price. If the successful bidder fails to execute the contract and furnish the required bonds within 15 days after the Award, the Bid Security shall be forfeited to Owner as liquidated damages. Owner reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive any and all informalities not involving price, time or changes in the Work and the right to disregard all nonconforming, non-responsive, unbalanced or conditional Bids and the right to accept the Bid or Bids which best serve the interests of the Owner. Bidder awarded a contract for the

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WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS JULY 9, 2013 WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING The Walworth County Board of Supervisors meeting was called to order by Chair Russell at 6:12 p.m. in the County Board Room at the Walworth County Government Center, 100 W. Walworth Street, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. Roll call was conducted and the following Supervisors were present: Richard Brandl, Tim Brellenthin, Vice-Chair Jerry A. Grant, Daniel G. Kilkenny, Kenneth H. Monroe, Carl Redenius, Joe Schaefer, Tim Schiefelbein, David A. Weber, and Chair Nancy Russell. Rick Stacey was absent. A quorum was established. Daniel G. Kilkenny, Walworth County Board Supervisor, District #8, delivered the invocation. Amendments, Withdrawals, and Approval of Agenda On motion by Vice-Chair Grant, seconded by Supervisor Weber, the agenda was approved by voice vote with the following amendments: 1) To suspend the rules and move Item #5 under Communications and Matters to be Referred to follow Approval of the Minutes to permit Abigail Jensen, Walworth County Fairest of the Fair, to give a brief presentation; and 2) Move Executive Committee Item #6 and Park Committee Item #1 to immediately follow Ms. Jensen’s presentation. Approval of the Minutes On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Supervisor Schaefer, the June 11, 2013 Committee of the Whole and June 11, 2013 County Board Meeting minutes were approved by voice vote. Walworth County Fairest of the Fair Abigail Jensen delivered a brief presentation regarding the upcoming fair. Supervisor Rick Stacey arrived at 6:16 p.m. Executive Committee 6. Res. No. 39-07/13 – Recognizing Marilyn Putz for Her Service to Walworth County – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Supervisor Weber, Resolution No. 39-07/13 was approved by voice vote. Chair Russell asked Marilyn Putz to come forward. Chair Russell read the resolution. Ms. Putz thanked the board for their support. Park Committee 1. Res. No. 35-07/13 – Recognizing and Commending Jacob Dertz on his Completion of an Eagle Scout Service Project at Natureland Park – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Park Committee 5-0) On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, Resolution No. 35-07/13 was approved by voice vote. Chair Russell asked Jacob Dertz to come forward. Chair Russell read the resolution. Mr. Dertz thanked the county for their support. Comment Period by Members of the Public Concerning Items on the Agenda Clerk Bushey stated correspondence was received from Thomas Benson and Ronald Benson regarding a zoning matter that was the subject of a public hearing. We are not permitted to read it at tonight’s meeting due to the public hearing already being held. Clerk Bushey wanted the record to show that the correspondence was received. Kenneth Baumeister, 2831 Berndt Road, Lyons Township, addressed the board regarding the county’s health insurance plan. He stated he spoke to the board some time ago and requested that the county have bids done for the health insurance plan. He also expressed concern regarding part-time employees not having health insurance as many employers do not offer health insurance to part-time employees. Administrator Bretl stated the board will be discussing health insurance later in the meeting. He said the board has been studying health insurance for the past nine months, which involved receiving quotes from private plans and the state plan, considering modifications to the county’s current health plan, and studying a clinic option. He stated that with Federal Health Care Reform, employees who work 75% or more have to be provided with affordable health care coverage and this will also be discussed later in the meeting as there are some positions being upgraded to full-time. Appointments/Elections 1. Board of Adjustment Gregory Guidry – Three-year term to begin upon confirmation and end on June 30, 2016 (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) 2. Civil Service Board John Marra – Five-year term to begin upon confirmation and end on July 30, 2017 James Nerud – Term to begin upon confirmation and end on December 31, 2015 (Recommended by the Executive Committee 5-0) On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Supervisor Weber, the appointments to the Board of Adjustment and the Civil Service Board were approved by voice vote. Communications and Matters to Be Referred Chair Russell announced that unless there was a request for an individual communication to be discussed, the Clerk would dispense with the reading of each title and the Chair would direct that all communications be referred or placed on file as indicated on the agenda. 1. Claims Received After Agenda Mailing 2. Claims: a) Summons and Complaint – Winston Revocable Trust, Bear

STATE OF WISCONSIN

) ) SS

COUNTY OF WALWORTH ) I, Kimberly S. Bushey, County Clerk in and for the County aforesaid, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the proceedings of the County Board of Supervisors for the July 9, 2013 meeting. Sept. 12, 2013

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ORDINANCE AMENDING WALWORTH COUNTY ZONING ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Walworth County Board of Supervisors has heretofore been petitioned to amend the Walworth County Zoning Ordinance; and WHEREAS, the petitions have been referred to the Walworth County Zoning Agency for public hearing; and WHEREAS, the Walworth County Zoning Agency on due notice conducted public hearings on the proposed amendments and filed their recommendations with the board; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendments have been given due consideration by the Board in open session. NOW, THEREFORE, the County Board of Supervisors of the County of Walworth do ordain as follows: The Zoning Ordinance of Walworth County and Shoreland Zoning Ordinance (and accompanying Zoning Map) is amended in the following respects: 1. Mark N. and Katherine I. Gorecki, Town of Sugar Creek – Filed a petition to amend said zoning maps from A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District and A1 Prime Agricultural Land District to A-4 Agricultural Related Manufacturing, Warehousing and Marketing District the following described lands: Part of Tax Parcel #GA356100001, Section 23, Sugar Creek Township. A part of Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3561, located in the southwest ¼ of the northwest ¼ of Section 23, Town 3 North, Range 16 East, Walworth County, Wisconsin, currently zoned A-1 and A-5 to be rezoned A-4, described as follows: Area A A-1 Zoning to be A-4 Zoning, Described as Follows: Beginning at the southeast corner of Lot 1 of said CSM 3561 on the northerly line of Schmidt Road; Thence N 89Deg 52Min 48Sec W, 97.44 Feet; Thence N 00Deg 05Min 50Sec E, 250.00 feet; Thence N 00Deg 06Min 55Sec E, 232.75 Feet to the southerly line of County Trunk Highway H; Thence S 41Deg 13Min 00Sec E, 319.62 Feet to the north corner of Lot 2 of said CSM 3561; Thence S 48Deg 47Min 00Sec W, 151.151.21 Feet; Thence S 00Deg 07Min 12Sec W, 142.89 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 1.25 acres of land. Area B A-5 Zoning to be A-4 Zoning, Described as follows: Commencing at the southeast corner of Lot 1 of said CSM 3561 on the northerly line of Schmidt Road; Thence N 89Deg 52Min 48Sec W, 97.44 Feet; Thence N 00Deg 05Min 50Sec E, 250.00 Feet; Thence N 00Deg 06Min 55Sec E, 45.86 Feet to the point of beginning; Thence N 89Deg 53Min 07Sec W, 151.04 Feet; Thence N 00Deg 06Min 53Sec E, 65.36 Feet; Thence S 89Deg 57Min 50Sec E, 151.04 Feet; Thence S 00Deg 06Min 55Sec W, 65.56 Feet to the point of beginning. Containing 0.23 acres of land more or less. 2. J&J Fabricating Real Estate LLC, Town of Linn – Filed a petition to amend said zoning maps from R-1 Single Family Residence District to M-1 Industrial District the following described lands: Part of Tax Parcel #I L 2100010, Section 21, Linn Township. A parcel of land located in the northwest ¼ of Section 21, Township 1 North, Range 17 East, Town of Linn, Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Northwest ¼ of said Section 21; thence S 00°00’00” E along the west line of said Northwest ¼ 1011.74 feet; thence S 89°42’27” E 395.97 feet to the point of beginning; thence S 89°42’27” E 88.67 feet; thence S 00°00’00” E 308.23 feet to the centerline of Linton Road; thence S 74°18’39” W 92.15 feet thence N 00°00’27” E 333.60 feet to the point of beginning. Said parcel contains 28,463 square feet. 3. Eugene J. and Donna M. Frodl, Town of Whitewater – Filed a petition to amend said zoning maps from M-3 Mineral Extraction District to A-1 Prime Agricultural District and A-5 Agricultural Rural Residential District the following described lands: Part of Tax Parcel #D W 3200001, Section 32, Whitewater Township. Legal Description – Rezone Parcel “A” A parcel of land currently M-3 Zoning to revert back to A-1 zoning located in part of

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September 12, 2013

The Regional News

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PUBLIC NOTICES WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

WALWORTH COUNTY LEGALS

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S 28°47’00” W along said centerline 294.23 feet to the intersection of the south line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18; Thence N 89°39’54” W along said south line 624.30 feet to a found iron rod marking the southwest corner of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18; Thence N 00°01’14” W along the west line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast 1/4 , 853.30 feet; Thence N 85°48’06” E 644.70 Feet to a found iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of Lot 1 Certified Survey Map No. 1640; Thence S 05°59’32” W 209.69 feet to a found iron pipe marking the Southwest corner of said Lot 1; Thence S 89°23’26” E 208.71 Feet to the point of beginning, and containing 646,030 square feet or 14.83 acre(s) of land, more or less. Tax Parcel KA164000002 PARCEL 2: A parcel of land located in the Northeast ¼ of Section 18, Town 3 North, Range 17 East, Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as follows: commence at the Northeast corner of said Section 18; thence N 89°35’W 1321.00 feet, more or less to the Northwest corner of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18; thence S 0° 25’ W along the west line of said Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼, 49.97 feet to the point of beginning; Thence S 89° 33’ E 677.53 feet; thence S 6°48’05” W 366.74 feet; thence westerly 635 feet, more or less to the west line of said Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼; thence N 0°25’ E 420 feet to the point of beginning. Corrected legal description prepared by Land Mark Surveying: A parcel of land located in part of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of Section 18, Town 3 North, Range 17 East, Lafayette Township, Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of said Section 18; thence N 89°35’00” W along the north line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18 and the center line or County Trunk Highway ES 1324.36 feet (recorded as 1321.00 feet) to the Northwest corner of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18; thence S 0°01’14” E (recorded as S 0°25’ W) along the west line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18, 49.97 feet to a found iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of said highway and the point of beginning; thence S 89°33’00” E along said right-of-way 681.15 feet (recorded as 677.53 feet) to a set iron pipe; thence S 05°59’32” W 364.18 feet (recorded as S 6°48’05” W 366.74 feet) to a found iron pipe; thence S 85°48’06” W 644.70 feet (recorded as westerly 635 feet more or less) to the west line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of Said Section 18; thence N 00°01’14” W along said west line 414.74 feet (recorded as N 0°25’ E 420 feet) to the point of beginning, and containing 256,787 square feet or 5.90 acre(s) of land more or less. Tax Parcel K LF1800001C 5. Ellen and Jerry Dean, Town of Walworth – Filed a petition to amend said zoning maps from M-1 Industrial Park to A5 Agricultural-Rural Residential District the following described lands: All of Tax Parcel #E W 500011A, Walworth Township.

bers from each of the seven counties. One member is appointed by the County Board and two members are appointed by the Governor. Walworth County’s representatives are Chair Nancy Russell, Charles Colman, and Health and Human Services Director Linda Seemeyer. Mr. Yunker gave an overview of the commission’s functions, which include data collection, long range planning for physical development of the region, and providing a center to coordinate day-to-day planning activities. He also gave an overview of the commission’s regional planning functions, which includes population and employment forecasts, land use planning, transportation planning, environmental planning, regional housing planning, and county and local government support. He stated the support the commission provides to counties and local governments includes orthophotography and mapping, comprehensive planning, park and open space plans, farmland preservation plans, lake management plans, zoning and subdivision ordinances, county surveyor consortium, field activities, traffic forecasts and studies, and program administration. Mr. Yunker gave an overview of SEWRPC’s regional plans that were recently completed, such as the Regional Water Supply Plan, Regional Housing Plan, and Regional Natural Areas Plan. He stated recent projects that were completed in Walworth County include the Walworth County Jurisdictional Highway System Plan, Walworth County Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan, and Walworth County Redistricting Plan. He also stated projects that are currently underway in Walworth County include the Walworth County Park and Open Space Plan, Jackson Creek Watershed Protection Plan, City of Elkhorn Lincoln Street traffic study, and Town of Sugar Creek Impact fee ordinance. He said ongoing projects in Walworth County include serving as the County Surveyor, regional coordination center for orthophotography, advising lake management districts, wetland and primary environmental corridor delineation, reviewing public and private sanitary sewer extensions, and providing assistance to local governments and economic development organizations in the application of industry/occupation/workforce software. Mr. Yunker gave an overview of the funding sources for the commission. He stated the proposed 2014 budget revenues is $7.09 million, which consists of a regional tax levy, state and federal funding, and local and state contracts. He said the proposed regional tax levy for 2014 is $2,370,245 and this is apportioned to each county based on the county’s proportion of the equalized valuation in the region. He also said the county collects its share of the regional tax levy by adding the appropriate amount to the county levy and spreading it across the county tax base. He stated the regional tax levy for SEWRPC has not increased over the last eight years. Mr. Yunker concluded the presentation by taking questions from Supervisors. Supervisor Kilkenny inquired about how technology will affect future plans. Mr. Yunker stated they will look at how technology will change things and their new transportation plan will look out to the year 2050. He said they will coordinate with the US Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration. Supervisor Schiefelbein asked how the commission decides what projects they take on and if there are fees imposed for a study. Mr. Yunker stated federal funding is for transportation and they try to reserve a portion of those funds to respond to the needs of counties and municipalities. He said it is a first come, first serve basis on how they decide which projects they take on and they try to have a modest charge. He stated it cost approximately $15,000 for Walworth County’s redistricting plan. Adjournment On motion by Supervisor Kilkenny, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, the meeting was adjourned at 6:01 p.m.

AUGUST 15, 2013 WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS SPECIAL COUNTY BOARD MEETING The Walworth County Board of Supervisors meeting was called to order by Chair Russell at 4:00 p.m. in the County Board Room at the Walworth County Government Center, 100 W. Walworth Street, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. Roll call was conducted and the following Supervisors were present: Richard Brandl, Tim Brellenthin, Vice-Chair Jerry A. Grant, Kenneth H. Monroe, Carl Redenius, Joe Schaefer, Tim Schiefelbein, Rick Stacey, David A. Weber, and Chair Nancy Russell. Daniel G. Kilkenny was absent. A quorum was established. Amendments, Withdrawals, and Approval of Agenda On motion by Supervisor Brandl, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, the agenda was approved by voice vote with no withdrawals. Comment Period by Members of the Public Concerning Items on the Agenda There was none. Communications and Matters to be Referred 1. Report of the County Clerk Regarding Zoning Petitions (To be referred to the County Zoning Agency) County Zoning Agency Report of Proposed Zoning Amendments 1. Mark and Kathy Gorecki, Section 23, Sugar Creek Township. Rezone 1.48 acres of A-1 and A-5 to A-4 – Approved: 6-0 (July 18, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) 2. J&J Fabricating Real Estate LLC – Jeff Reed (Applicant/Owner), Section 21, Linn Township. Rezone .65 acres of R1 to M-1 – Approved: 6-0 (July 18, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) 3. Eugene and Donna Frodl, Section 32, Whitewater Township. Rezone 40.33 acres of M-3 to 34.90 acres of A-1 and 5.43 acres of A-5 – Approved: 6-0 (July 18, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) 4. William M. and Lorraine A. Norem, Section 18, Lafayette Township. Rezone 10.5 acres of R-5 and A-2 to A-5 – Approved: 6-0 (July 18, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) 5. Jerry and Ellen Dean, Section 5, Walworth Township. Rezone .43 acres of M-1 to A-5 – Approved: 6-0 (July 18, 2013 County Zoning Agency Public Hearing) On motion by Supervisor Stacey, seconded by Supervisor Weber, the County Zoning Agency Report of Proposed Zoning Amendments, Items 1 through 5, was approved as recommended by the County Zoning Agency. Human Resources Committee 1. Res. No. 45-08/13 – Approving a Collective Bargaining Agreement By and Between Walworth County and the Walworth County Children with Disabilities Education Board and Lakeland Education Association for the Period of July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014 – Vote Required: Majority (Recommended by the Human Resources Committee 5-0 and the Children with Disabilities Education Board 5-0) On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Vice-Chair Grant, Resolution No. 45-08/13 was approved by voice vote. Comment Period by Members of the Public Concerning Items Not on the Agenda Merilee Holst, 398 Mill Street, Fontana, of the Geneva Lake Conservancy addressed the board regarding the Amon non-metallic mining site in Williams Bay. Ms. Holst read an email from Ted Peters of the Geneva Lake Environmental Agency, which she forwarded to Supervisor Kilkenny, which expressed concern about the need to resolve the issue of the Amon pit runoff to Southwick Creek and Williams Bay. She stated she believes there is a bond in existence for this particular pit and she asked if the bond can be used for remediation in addition to reclamation. Chairperson’s Report Chair Russell reminded Supervisors of the next meeting, which is scheduled for Thursday, September 5, 2013 with the Committee of the Whole at 5:00 p.m. and the regular County Board meeting at 6:00 p.m. Administrator Bretl stated there will also be a few committee meetings prior to the September 5, 2013 meeting. He a meeting schedule will be included in an Administrator’s Report and Update. Adjournment On motion by Supervisor Weber, seconded by Supervisor Brandl, the meeting was adjourned at 4:11 p.m.

changed in Section 15-17 but not in other sections of the Code where they have been referenced. PART II: This ordinance shall become effective upon passage and publication. The full text of this ordinance is on file in the County Clerk’s office, Room 101, Government Center, 100 West Walworth Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us PASSED and ADOPTED by the Walworth County Board of Supervisors this 5th day of September 2013. Nancy Russell County Board Chair

Disabilities Act of 1990 (disability)

Kimberly S. Bushey Attest: County Clerk Published this 12th day of September 2013.

If any person believes that the Big Foot Area School’s personnel have failed to follow applicable law, or in some way discriminated against pupils on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, handicap, religion, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability, he/she may bring or send a complaint to the District Administrator of that respective Big Foot Area School.

the Northwest1/4 and Southwest ¼ of the Northeast ¼ and part of the Northeast ¼ and Southeast ¼ of the Northwest ¼ of Section 32, Town 4 North, Range 15 East, Walworth County, Wisconsin, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the East ¼ corner of said Section 32 (T4N; R15E); Thence S 87Deg 54Min 56Sec W, 2049.81 feet along the south line of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 32 to the point of beginning; Thence continue along above said South line S 87Deg 54Min 56Sec W, 588.55 feet to a concrete county monument found marking the center ¼ corner of said Section 32; Thence along the South line of the Northwest ¼ of said Section 32 S 88Deg 15Min 36Sec W, 247.68 feet to the easterly right of way line of State Trunk Highway “89”; Thence along above said Easterly line, N 01Deg 54Min 04Sec E, 225.75 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 100.00 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 33Deg 11Min 11Sec W, 213.60 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 900.00 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 09Deg 21Min 33Sec W, 684.01 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line N 06Deg 59Min 08Sec E, 142.95 Feet; Thence N 87Deg 46Min 03Sec E, 687.25 Feet; Thence S 14Deg 34Min 52Sec E, 2267.87 Feet to the point of beginning. Excepting thereform the following parcel of land beginning at the above mentioned concrete county monument found marking the center ¼ corner of said Section 32 (T4N; R15E); Thence S 88Deg 15Min 36Sec W, 247.68 Feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Trunk Highway 89; Thence along above said Easterly line, N 01Deg 54 Min 04Sec E, 225.75 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 100.00 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 33Deg 11Min 11Sec W, 213.60 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 30.39 Feet; Thence N 77Deg 22Min 11Sec E, 200.00 Feet; Thence S 30Deg 39Min 43Sec E, 300.97 Feet; Thence N 87Deg 12Min 14Sec E, 394.39 Feet; Thence S 06Deg 31Min 13Sec W, 318.57 Feet to the South line of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 32; Thence along above said South line, S 87Deg 54Min 56 Sec W, 321.09 Feet to the point of beginning. Containing 1,520,204 Square Feet (34.90 Acres) of land, more or less. Meaning and intending to revert all lands within parcel boundaries currently M-3 Zoning back to A-1 Zoning. Legal Description – Rezone & Conditional Use Parcel “B” A parcel of land currently M-3 Zoning to become A-5 Zoning and be subject to conditional use located in part of the Southwest ¼ of the Northeast ¼ and part of the Southeast ¼ of the Northwest ¼ of Section 32, Town 4 North, Range 15 East, Walworth County, Wisconsin, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the East ¼ corner of said Section 32 (T4N;R15E); Thence S 87Deg 54Min 56Sec W, 2317.27 Feet along the South line of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 32 to the point of beginning; Thence continue along above said South line, S 87Deg 54Min 56Sec W, 321.09 Feet to a concrete county monument found marking the center ¼ corner of said Section 32 (T4N,R15E); thence S 88Deg 15Min 36Sec W, 247.68 Feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Trunk Highway “89”; Thence along above said Easterly line, N 01Deg 54Min 04Sec E, 225.75 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 100.00 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 33Deg 11Min 11Sec W, 213.60 Feet; Thence continue along said Easterly line, N 12Deg 37Min 49Sec W, 30.39Feet; Thence N 77Deg 22Min 11Sec E, 200.00 Feet; Thence S 30Deg 39Min 43Sec E, 300.97 Feet; Thence N 87Deg 12Min 14Sec E, 394.39 Feet; Thence S 06Deg 31Min 13Sec W, 318.57 Feet to the point of beginning. Containing 236,448 square feet (5.43 acres) of land, more or less. 4. William and Lorraine Norem, Town of LaFayette – Filed a petition to amend said zoning maps from R-5 Planned Residential Development District and A-2 Agricultural Land District to A-5Agricultural Rural Residential District the following described lands: Tax Parcel #K LF180001C and part of Tax Parcel #KA 164000002, Section 18, Lafayette Township. PARCEL 1: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 1640 as recorded in Document No. 155836, located in the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of section 18, Town 3 North, Range 17 East, Town of LaFayette, Walworth County, Wisconsin. The complete and accurate legal description prepared by Land Mark Surveying is more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 1640, located in part of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of Section 18, Town 3 North, Range 17 East, Town of LaFayette, Walworth County, Wisconsin, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of said Section 18; Thence N 89°35’00” W along the north line of the Northeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 18 and the centerline of County Trunk Highway “ES” 429.20 feet; Thence S 05°59’12” W along the centerline of Cobb Road 625.18 feet to the point of beginning; Thence continue S 05°59’12” W along said centerline 245.96 feet; Thence S 11°13’00” W along said centerline 194.60 feet; Thence

ATTEST this 15th day of August 2013 Nancy Russell County Board Chair ATTEST this 15th day of August 2013 Kimberly S. Bushey County Clerk Sept. 12, 2013

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JULY 9, 2013 SESSION OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE The Walworth County Board Committee of the Whole meeting was called to order by Chair Russell at 5:10 p.m. at the Government Center, 100 W. Walworth Street, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. Roll Call Roll Call was conducted and the following Supervisors were present: Richard Brandl, Tim Brellenthin, Vice-Chair Jerry A. Grant, Daniel G. Kilkenny, Kenneth H. Monroe, Carl Redenius, Joe Schaefer, Tim Schiefelbein, David A. Weber, and Chair Nancy Russell. Rick Stacey was absent. • The purpose of the meeting is: • Presentation by the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission regarding its organization and mission as well as services it provides to counties Ken Yunker, Executive Director of Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC), delivered a presentation. Mr. Yunker stated SEWRPC is a planning agency that was created by the state in 1960 to assist the seven counties in Southeastern Wisconsin in considering and addressing physical development and infrastructure problems that extend beyond their boundaries. Mr. Yunker stated the commission is strictly advisory and works to make advisory recommendations for the county and municipal officials. He also stated the commission prepares advisory long-range plans for the region, which include plans for land use, transportation, water quality management, flood management, parks and open space, environmental corridors, natural areas, and water supply. He said SEWRPC is governed by a 21 member commission, which consists of three mem-

NOTICE OF SALE OF ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Owners of record are:

Owners of record are:

STATE OF WISCONSIN

) ) SS

COUNTY OF WALWORTH) I, Kimberly S. Bushey, County Clerk in and for the County aforesaid, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the proceedings of the County Board of Supervisors for the July 9, 2013 Committee of the Whole Meeting. Sept. 9, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN

) ) SS

COUNTY OF WALWORTH ) ORDINANCE NO. 798 – 09/13 AMENDING SECTION 16-11 OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES RELATING TO ALCOHOL ON COUNTY-OWNED PROPERTY THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: PART I: That Section 16-11 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances is hereby amended. The purpose of this ordinance is to allow for wine to be used in cooking demonstrations sponsored by UW-Extension at the Government Center. PART II: This Ordinance shall become effective upon passage and publication. The full text of this ordinance is on file in the County Clerk’s office, Room 101, Government Center, 100 West Walworth Street, Elkhorn, WI 53121; telephone: 262741-4241; website: www.co.walworth.wi.us PASSED and ADOPTED by the Walworth County Board of Supervisors this 5th day of September2013. Nancy Russell County Board Chair

I, Kimberly S. Bushey, County Clerk in and for the County aforesaid, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the proceedings of the County Board of Supervisors for the August 15, 2013 Special County Board meeting. Sept. 12, 2013

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Crystal Opper #339 Furniture, boxes, household items & misc. personal property

W2285 Townline Rd. Lake Geneva

ORDINANCE NO. 799 – 09/13 AMENDING SECTION 15-810 OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES RELATING TO UPDATES TO JOB TITLES THE WALWORTH COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: PART I: That Section 15-810 of the Walworth County Code of Ordinances is hereby amended. The purpose of this ordinance amendment is to update the Code with respect to the titles of several positions that have been

Kimberly S. Bushey Attest: County Clerk Published this 12th day of September 2013.

351 E. Host Dr. Lake Geneva

ARE YOU MAKING $60,000 + Per Year as a Residential Heating Technician

Sale at 9 a.m. at Townline Road location, followed immediately by Sale at Host Drive location

September 28, 2013

POTTER’S SELF STORAGE, LLC

FONTANA PUBLIC NOTICES VILLAGE OF FONTANA ON GENEVA LAKE Walworth County, WI NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING for ZONING CODE AMENDMENT before the VILLAGE OF FONTANA PLAN COMMISSION and the JOINT EXTRATERRITORIAL ZONING COMMITTEE (Village of Fontana, Town of Linn, Town of Walworth) Monday, September 23, 2013 5:30 p.m. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public Hearing will be held before the Village of Fontana on Geneva Lake Plan Commission and the Joint Extraterritorial Zoning Committee, at the Fontana Village Hall, 175 Valley View Drive, on Monday, September 23, 2013 starting at 5:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard concerning a Petition to Amend the ETZ Zoning Ordinance Sections 18-535(m), 18-542(a) and 18-546, filed by the Village of Fontana to update and align the ETZ Ordinance with the Walworth County Zoning Code. Copies of the petition are on file at the Village Hall and available for public inspection during regular office hours from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Submitted by: Dennis L. Martin, Village Clerk villageclerk@villageoffontana.com Sept. 5 & 12, 2013

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VILLAGE OF FONTANA ON GENEVA LAKE Walworth County, WI NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING For ZONING CODE AMENDMENT before the VILLAGE OF FONTANA PLAN COMMISSION Monday, September 23, 2013 @ 5:30 PM PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public Hearing will be held on Monday, September 23, 2013 beginning at 5:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, before the Plan Commission at the Fontana Village Hall, 175 Valley View Drive, concerning proposed Zoning Code Amendments to Section 18-92, 18-110(d)(3) and 18110(d)(6)e regarding temporary sunshade structures. Copies of the Petition for Amendment to the Zoning Ordinance are on file at the Fontana Village Hall and available for public inspection during regular office hours [8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.]. Submitted by: Dennis L. Martin, Village Clerk villageclerk@villageoffontana.com Sept. 5 & 12, 2013

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The Big Foot Area Schools encourage informal resolution of complaints under this policy. A formal complaint resolution procedure is available, however, to address allegations of violations of the policy in the Big Foot Area Schools. Any questions concerning this policy should be directed to the District Administrator of your respective Big Foot Area Schools. COMPLAINT PROCEDURE

Federal discrimination complaints may be filed with the Office for Civil Rights, Chicago Office, U.S. Department of Education, 111 Canal Street, Suite 1053, Chicago, Illinois 60606-7204. Step 1: Any student, parent, or resident complaining of discrimination on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin, color, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability or handicap in school programs or activities shall report the complaint in writing to the District Administrator. a. Discrimination complaints relating to the identification, evaluation, educational placement or the provision of free appropriate public education of a child with a disability shall be processed in accordance with established appeal procedures. b. Discrimination complaints relating to programs specifically governed by federal law or regulation (e.g. EDGAR complaints) shall be referred directly to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Step 2: The District Administrator, upon receiving such a written complaint, shall immediately undertake an investigation. The District Administrator will review the facts comprising the alleged discrimination with appropriate building personnel, determine the action to be taken, if any, and report in writing the receipt of the complaint within 45 days. Step 3: If the complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the District Administrator, he/she may appeal the decision in writing to the School Board. The Board shall hear the appeal at its next regular meeting, or a special meeting may be called for the purpose of hearing the appeal. The Board shall make its decision in writing within 90 days of receipt of the initial complaint, unless the parties agree to an extension of time. Copies of the written decision shall be mailed or delivered to the complainant and the District Administrator. Step 4: The complainant shall be notified of the right to appeal a negative determination by the Board to the State Department of Public Instruction and the procedures for making the appeal. The complainant must file this appeal within 30 days of the Board’s decision. Appeals should be addressed to: State Superintendent, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 125 South Webster Street, P.O. Box 7841, Madison, Wisconsin 53707. Sara Norton, District Administrator, Fontana Elementary School Samantha Polek, District Administrator, Reek Elementary School Lillian Henderson, District Administrator, Sharon Community School Pamela Knorr, District Administrator, Walworth Elementary School Dorothy Kaufmann, District Administrator, Big Foot High School Sept. 12, 2013

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BIG FOOT SCHOOL DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY The following public notice shall be published as a class 1 notice annually. Notice to the Electors of the Big Foot Area Schools (Fontana, Reek, Sharon, and Walworth Grade Schools, and Big Foot High School) PUBLIC NOTICE OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND STUDENT DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT PROCEDURE POLICY

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Lorie Bernhardt #1102 Furniture, household items &misc. personal property Dorothy Biris #1417 Household items &misc. personal property Jason Leonard #1103 Washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator, household items &misc. personal property DanielWinters Jr. #1411 household items &misc. personal property

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BIG FOOT SCHOOL DISTRICT

It is the policy of the Big Foot Area Schools (Fontana, Reek, Sharon and Walworth Grade Schools, and Big Foot High School) that no person may be denied admission to any public school in this district or be denied participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any curricular, extracurricular, pupil service, recreational, or other program or activity because of the person’s sex, race, color, national origin, ancestry, creed, religion, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability as required by s. 118.13, Wisconsin Statutes. This policy also prohibits discrimination as defined by Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1972 (sex), Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (race and national origin), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (handicap), and Americans with

NOTICE TO THE ELECTORS OF THE BIG FOOT AREA SCHOOLS (Fontana, Reek, Sharon and Walworth Grade Schools, and Big Foot High School) (Wis. Stat. § 118.125) PUPIL RECORDS Pupil records are maintained in the interest of students in order to assist school personnel in providing appropriate educational services. Therefore, it is the policy of each school district within the Big Foot area Schools Association to create, maintain, release and dispose of pupil records in accordance with applicable law. The following types of pupil records may be maintained by each of the school districts: behavioral records, directory data, progress records and pupil physical health records. Pupil records, with the exception of behavioral records, shall be maintained for a period of five years beyond the date at which a student ceases to be enrolled. Behavioral records shall be destroyed one year after a student ceases to be enrolled unless the student specifies in writing that his or her behavioral records may be maintained for a longer period. Sara Norton, District Administrator, Fontana Elementary School Samantha Polek, District Administrator, Reek Elementary School Lillian Henderson, District Administrator, Sharon Elementary School Pamela Knorr, District Administrator, Walworth Elementary School Dorothy Kaufmann, District Administrator, Big Foot Union High School Sept. 12, 2013

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September 12, 2013

AS A KENOSHA NEWS SUBSCRIBER YOU HAVE ACCESS TO ALL ONLINE CONTENT AT KENOSHANEWS.COM FOR FREE! Call the Kenosha News Today! Customer Care Center 262-657-1500 and we’ll be glad to help you get registered. Ask about our Members Program for a few cents more you can receive your paper plus local retail offers and more!!

Help Wanted

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT (F / T) Design/Build/Maintenance firm, located in Libertyville, seeks detail-oriented professional to assist in answering phones, reception, typing filing, misc. projects. Excellent math skills/accuracy a must. MS, Word, Excel, 50wpm. OT and Sat. required during peak season. Bi-lingual and experience in green industry a +. Excellent Compensation and benefits package. Email resume: mailbox@roccofiore.com or fax to 847-816-1137 Job Site ID#1015803 CAREER JOBS 40 openings. Hiring now 1st/2nd shifts. Racine area. Stable job history and must pass DT. $9-25/hour. • CDL Drivers • CNC Machinists • Dock Workers • Forklift • Polishers • Shipping Clerks • Packagers • Welders Service First Staffing 4901 Washington Ave,Racine hr@service1ststaffing.com Job Site ID#1016260

The Kenosha News Information Technology department has an immediate opening for a part-time Computer Technician Candidates must have proficiency in the following areas: • TCP/IP, LAN/WAN, and 802.11n technologies. • Rack server hardware maintenance • 2003 Active Directory support and maintenance Microsoft Windows DNS, DHCP services • Microsoft Windows XP, 7, 8 troubleshooting • Microsoft Office 2003-2010 support Preferred candidates may also have these additional competencies: • Firewall, Symantec Endpoint Protection support • VPN methodology & configuration • Adobe Design Applications (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator) • Hyper-V virtualization • Citrix support

CHILD CARE PROFESSIONAL Looking for a change? Full and Part time positions available. We are a large Center with a small family friendly atmosphere. Candidates must be nurturing and have a love for children. The right person must be reliable, creative and possess strong communication skills. Room for advancement for Leaders! Apply in Person at Extended Love CDC, 9191 80th St, Pleasant Prairie. No Phone Calls please. Come and see what makes us the Best! Job Site ID#1016219

Candidate must be organized, analytical and customer-service oriented. They should be able to apply and execute independent, critical-thinking solutions when problem solving. This position will require holiday, night and weekend shifts. If interested, please send a resume and cover letter to: Human Resources

5800 7th Avenue Kenosha, WI 53140 Or apply within Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1015141

Help Wanted

Sr Business Analyst (Zion, IL) Identify & dvlp complex fin’l analysis, tool kits & fin’l models using 3x growth plans to improve fin’l mgmt; conduct analysis & submit reports of corporate fin’l status, operational & capital expenses & long term debt decisions; performs periodic review of budgets, investment targets & forecasting at all levels; researches & examines fin’l issues & industry trends; assist in monitoring fin’l structures, banking relationships, & innovative fin’l alternatives; serves as fin’l liaison btwn CFO & dept mgrs; manage processes to identify creative solutions; participates in strategic planning & assists in execution of advisory services; serves as project mgr for investment initiatives co.-wide, operational & hospital level. Reqmts: B.S. in Econ., Fin., Bus., or rltd field & min. 36 mos. exp in job off’d, fin’l analyst or in bus. analyst rltd pos. Proficient in Microsoft excel, fin’l acctg, advanced fin’l modeling & healthcare banking. Send cv/res.:C. Kubsik, Midwestern Regional Medical Center, HR Dept., 2610 Sheridan Rd, Zion, IL 60099 TELEMARKETING Needed: 6 people to work in call center at show office. 262-605-1424 (fax or phone), or email: showfund@gmail.com Job Site ID#1014567 TRUCK MECHANIC (F / T) Landscape firm, in Libertyville seeks motivated, self starter, 3 years minimum experience working on GMC/Chevy/International trucks, Skidsteer/John Deere loaders. Must have own tools, be a leader, problem solver & proficient in record keeping. Excellent benefits package. Salary to commensurate with experience. Email resume: mailbox@roccofiore.com or call 847-6801207. Job Site ID#1015804

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GET ROOFED! All types of roofing & repairs. Free estimates. References 28 yrs exp. 262-764-0041

DELIVERY SUPPORT ASSISTANT

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The Kenosha News is accepting applications for a part-time distribution support assistant. This position will assist and support the distribution management team in helping to ensure the satisfaction of our valued newspaper print subscribers. Successful applicants will work 2 to 3 days a week, 2:30 to 6:30 a.m., including some weekends and holidays and be able to work outdoors in all weather. Applicants must have a valid driver’s license and good driving record. If interested, please send your resume to:

Human Resources 5800 7th Avenue Kenosha, WI 53140 Or apply in person. Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1015636 DIETARY COOK—Barton of Zion & Senior Living Facility is seeking a responsible & experienced person as a Part-time Dietary Cook. We are seeking an induvial who has patience & is receptful & dependable. If interested please stop in and complete an application for employment or fax resume to: Pat Hernandez at 731-6430. 3500 Sheridan Rd, Zion, IL 60099. Ph. 847-872-1500 1015960

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Sports Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools

Thursday, September 12, 2013

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First conference win in five years Bay dominates Johnson Creek 45-20 By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

MICHAEL GUSS INTERCEPTED a wobbly pass and returned it 45 yards for a TD Friday night.

WILLIAMS BAY — 2-1. Tied for the conference lead. Win 45-20. Those are not statistics usually associated with the Williams Bay football team. But they all apply after the Bulldogs’ victory over Johnson Creek Friday night. The Bay is 2-1 for the year. They’re tied for the conference lead with a 1-0 record. And their 45-20 trouncing of Johnson Creek was no accident. It was the first conference victory for the Bay in five years and buries the notion that the Bulldogs can only beat Kenosha Christian Life. It didn’t start like a blowout for the Chiefs though. Johnson Creek scored first on a long pass play, But the Bulldogs came right back with a TD pass of their own, when Ryan Bonamarte caught a John Higgins pass at the back of the endzone. It would be the first of five first-half touchdowns for the Bay and gave them a 35-6 lead at the break. After the break, both teams agreed to

a running clock — a concession on Johnson Creek’s part that the Bulldogs had won. Just about everything worked Friday night. The Bulldogs capitalized on four Johnson Creek fumbles and turned a pass interception into a TD. The Bulldogs had a balanced offensive attack with 156 yards through the air and 171 on the ground. Higgins hit 10 of 14 passes, including a touchdown. Most of his completions came on sideline passes and he connected on several more after eluding the rush and rolling out. His QB rating was 131.8. He also had 86 yards on only seven carries for a 12.3 average and three TDs. His most spectacular run came in the fourth quarter when he appeared trapped on a quarterback keeper only to break away. Three Johnson Creek players had him squared up on the numbers, but Higgins quickly changed directions and outsprinted the Johnson Creek defenders down the opposite sideline for a 40-yard TD. Running back Michael Guss added 58 yards on 15 carries and Jacob Clark 21 on 8. PLEASE SEE WILIIAMS BAY PAGE 3C

Badgers run over Waterford By Ben Stanley Special to the Regional News The Badger run offense went the distance Friday against reigning conference champion Waterford Union High School. In fact, the Badgers had five times the rushing distance of their opponent who they beat 28-6. Badger put up 267 rushing yards against Waterford while allowing just 57 in return — the latest in dominant ground performances. In three games, Badger has gained an average of 268 rushing yards and allowed 111, bolstering the most productive rushing offense in the Southern Lakes Conference. Badger has already rushed for 804 yards this season. The next closest conference opponent is Wilmot with 602. Behind excellent blocking from the offensive line and with help from a stingy defense, Badger came out of its first conference game a physical and confident contender with a 2-1 overall record. Fullback Andrew Allen ran for 76 yards and two touchdowns. PLEASE SEE BADGERS PAGE 3C

DAVE BAKER FOR THE REGIONAL NEWS

HALFBACK MATT REYNOLDS BREAKS into the open against Waterford.

Big Foot rolls 35-0 327 running yards against Evansville-Albany By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net

DAVE BAKER FOR THE REGIONAL NEWS

FRANKIE BOBULA HIT A 47 at a meeting against Elkhorn last week. It was the lowest round for the girls team since the 2011 WIAA sectional final. Badger lost to Elkhorn 200-230. Also making birdie was Molly Keenan. Other scores: Allison Paleka, 61; Moira Ring, 62; Molly Keenan, 61 and Ciara Johnson, 61. The JV score was Badger 269 - Elkhorn 283. Leading the way were Mackenzie Smid and Lizzy D’Auria, both with 63.

EVANSVILLE — Big Foot used a punishing ground game to defeat EvansvilleAlbany 35-0 Friday night. The Chiefs rumbled for 327 yards on 57 attempts led by running back Tim Long, who fell two yards short of the 200 yard mark enroute to two TDs and a 7.9 yard average. That put him at 437 yards for the year including a team high seven rushing TDs Brandon Hausner added 82 yards on 17 attempts. Quinn Dixon gained 43 yards on 8 attempts and a TD. He also added two catches. Quarterback Brett Morris drew first blood with a three-yard TD run with only a few minutes off the clock. Morris ended up hitting 6 of 12 passes for 44 yards. For the year, he’s connected on 31 of 51, a steller 60.8 percent. The Chiefs scored again on a 2-yard run by Long. Morris then connected with Long for a 2-yard TD to give the Chiefs a 21-0 halftime lead.

The Chiefs added another third-quarter score when Hausner ran in from the 3. A final score came when Dixon ran in from 7 yards in the fourth. After Dixon’s score, the game went to a running clock. Gus Wedig, Long, Daniel Pearce and Anthony Williams each had one reception. As usual, Wedig led the way on defense with 10 tackles, Long and Collin Frederick had seven each. Two of Long’s tackles went for a loss and Frederick’s added another backfield tackle. Jacob Waro chipped in six tackles and Hausner five. Dixon, Hausner and Chandler Hehr all had interceptions. Hausner’s pick went for 35 and Hehr’s pretty much put the game on ice. Frederick contributed two sacks and Long chipped in with one. Big Foot hosts Parkview in the conference opener at 7 p.m. Friday. The Chiefs, who are ranked first among Division 4 teams in the state in the coach’s poll, are seeking their seventh straight league title. PLEASE SEE BIG FOOT PAGE 2C


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The Regional News

September 12, 2013

SPORTS

Fall season more than football By John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net

It’s the fall sports season. That must mean football. But it also means some student athletes in other sports don’t get their pictures in the paper.

Freelance photographer Dave Baker helped us solve that problem with these photos of clockwise, Big Foot’s soccer team, Badger’s volleyball and tennis teams. Clockwise from top left, Big Foot soccer player Brian Wolski using his head in at the Big Foot

Invitational over the weekend. Badger volleyball player Chandler Carlson swoops toward the net during a 9-3 loss to Whitnall this week. And Joanie Williams sizes up the ball in a match against Westosha last week.

SPORT SHORTS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Big Foot/327 running yards against Evansville Right now, the Chiefs are tied with Palmyra-Eagle for the Rock Valley South lead at 1-0, and they’re the only team with a perfect overall record. Parkview lost to McFarland last week, 45-22 and are now 0-3 overall. Parkview relies heavily on the run, hitting on only 8 of 19 passes for the season, while running for 588 yards and a 5.9 yard average. They also give up a lot on the ground — 971 yards this year, an 8.4 yards a carry average. They’ve given up 13 rushing TDs. Parkview has been outscored 118 to 49, with almost half that damage coming in the first quarter.

Badger soccer team loses FORT ATKINSON — The Badger boys soccer team lost 1-0 to Fort Atkinson in a nonconference meet last week. The Fort Atkinson score came in the second half. Badger’s record is now 4-4. Fort Atkinson goes to 42-1. Badger had four shots on goal, Fort had nine. The Badger’s goalkeeper, Connor Koehn, had eight saves. Both teams had six fouls. The visitors, who were offsides three times, had two corner kicks to one for Fort.

Badger runners finish seventh

DAVE BAKER FOR THE REGIONAL NEWS

TIM LONG, 32, will be counted on against Parkview.

The Badger Boys Cross Country team ran into some stiff competition this week at the 38th annual Verona Invite and finished a respectable seventh place out of 22 teams. Leading the way was Alex Martinez, working his way through a talented field, to finish third place overall. “Alex continues to race right with the best of the state,” said coach Mike Butscher. “The pack got a little separated early, but ran a real strong race.” The other scorers included medalist Cody Sadikof, 37th, Sam Carmona, 40th, Gavin Denecke 50th, and Jake Bessenhofer, 57th. Butscher said he was pleased

with the efforts as Badger knocked more than 3 total minutes off of last year’s meet time. “To be three minutes ahead of last year as a team is great,” he said. “We have had two tough meets, facing some of the best teams in the state and have held our own. We went to this meet because we wanted to run on the Sectional course and also got to see some of the teams in our sectionals.” The Badgers beat perennial power, Janesville Craig and other good teams, but got beat by a good Verona team that may well stand in the way for a state berth. The Badgers will be running at Conference Relays on Saturday.

Big Foot-Bay tennis team wins WHITEWATER — The Big Foot-Williams Bay girls’ tennis team earned its first conference win of the season at Whitewater last Thursday. “The team played extremely well,” said coach Jim Karedes. “We continue to improve with each match.” The results are:

VARSITY 4-3 WIN 1 Singles: Annie McGrail (11) vs. Chelsea Niemuth (12) 6-1, 6-2 WIN 2 Singles: Maddie Palmer (9) vs. Kacie Snyder (10) 3-6, 4-6 Loss

3 Singles: Alex Zillmer (12) vs. Alex Cody (12) 2-6, 1-6 Loss 4 Singles: Megan Pultz (11) vs. Tanner Musgrove (12) 7-6 (5), 6-4 WIN — 1 Doubles: Natalie Boldger (12) / Morgan Grunow (10) vs. Emily Markham (12) / Erika Levine (12) 3-6, 6-1, 7-6 (1) WIN 2 Doubles: Hannah Ripkey (12) / Avery Aurand (11) vs. Sally Hixson (10) / Ali Sedmak (12) 6-1, 6-3 WIN 3 Doubles: Michaela McCabe (12) / Alivia Hancock (12) vs. Grace Tisdale (12) / Izzy Zahn (10) 1-6, 3-6 Loss

JV 1-6 Loss Cyclocross event Sunday The second annual “Lake Geneva Cross” Cyclocross race is taking place this Sunday at Lake Geneva Youth Camp. According to Wikipedia, cyclocross is a form of bicycle racing that consists of many laps of a short course featuring pavement, wooded trails, grass, steep hills and obstacles requiring the rider to quickly dismount, carry the bike while navigating the obstruction and remount. Races are from 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. More than 300 racers are expected, including 30 professionals and national champion Andy Schmidt. For more information: www. lakegenevacross.com.


September 12, 2013

The Regional News

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SPORTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Badger/Roll past Waterford Quarterback Collin Badger found the end zone Broderick hoofed it for 63 again on a 3-yard touchyards and a touchdown. down by running back And halfback Matt Austin Borst with 10:28 Reynolds emerged with left in the fourth quarter. 74 yards on 10 impressive Despite being penalattempts. ized for a whopping 109 “[Reynolds] was hurt yards, Badger never lost the first week,” Badger control of the game and coach Matt Hensler said. held on to the ball for more “Second week, he wasn’t than 31 minutes. really there yet. He came That time was domiout big tonight.” nated by running plays Reynolds ran tough. He — 53 in all. barreled into the Waterford Hensler also called defense 10 passing a n d Badger never lost control plays, many estabof the game and held on t a r g e t i n g l i s h e d to the ball for more than r e c e i v h i m ers 10 or 31 minutes. self as more yards a harddownfield. nosed third weapon in an Broderick completed already powerful Badger four throws for 51 yards. backfield. That was a big change “He adds a whole diffrom just four attempts ferent dimension to the and two completions for game,” Hensler said. 13 yards against MukwoThe Badger’s final scor- nago last week. ing drive was a quick, two“We take what they give play series from the Water- us,” Hensler said. “We saw ford 29 yard line. the opportunity [to pass] Broderick completed a on fi lm so we tried to take 16-yard pass to Nick Hall, advantage of that.” which set up a 13-yard Badger also took touchdown run by Allen advantage of Waterford on with 9:14 left in the game. defense, wearing down a Badger sustained three shaky offensive line. scoring drives of more Linebacker Nick Vollthan 50 yards. brecht had a disruptive The first and longest presence on the field and came in the first quar- consistently found himter when Badger ran nine self in the backfield applyplays for 72 yards. ing pressure and stopping Allen found the end runs. zone from the Waterford When he wasn’t sealing 26 behind solid down-field blocks on offense 6-footblocking. 4, 273 lb. lineman Broderick conJosh Doyle was verted the twobusting up runs point attempt on a for losses on the 3-yard keep. other side of the Wa t e r f o r d’s ball. only scoring drive “The defense came off short played fantastic yardage in the today,” Hensler beginning of the said. “ Very aggressecond quarter. sive play.” A strong kick Through three Allen off return by rungames, Badger ning back Jacob holds the highest Bauer and a personal foul point and yard differenagainst the Badgers gave tials in the conference, Waterford the ball on the scoring on average 11.4 Badger 35-yard line. more points and gaining Waterford scored 120 more total yards than three plays later on a short opponents. touchdown run by Bauer, Second in both categobut failed to convert a ries is undefeated Burltwo-point attempt. ington High School, averThree drives later, aging 7.7 more points and Badger pushed back with 61 more yards than oppoan 11 play, 61-yard drive. nents after three games. Broderick rushed 9 Burlington’s tight defense, which has yards for a touchdown allowed only 7.3 points with one minute remainand 77.3 rushing yards ing in the half. per game, will be Badger’s Donald Schnurrer’s next opponent. extra point was good and The two teams will Badger took a 15-6 lead to face off in Lake Geneva the locker room at halfthis Friday at 7 p.m. time. After a scoreless third,

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

CELEBRATING. The Williams Bay football team members celebrated their first conference victory in five years. Coach Derek Diehl told them to be humble.

More than football I thought Derek Diehl was all football. I hadn’t met the man until after the Williams Bay game Friday night. I was expecting someone intimidating. After all, he’s the owner and right tackle for the semi-pro Lake Geneva Generals, as well as coach at Williams Bay High School. He’s built like an offensive lineman, low to the ground like a fire hydrant — a fire hydrant that would bowl you over in an instant if you were in his way on the football field. But I saw him in a different light after the game. He told his team to enjoy the victory, but not to do anything dumb that night. I asked him why he took a knee to stop the clock at the end of the first half when his team had a chance for another touchdown. The Bay was ahead, but only a few yards from another touchdown with the clock ticking down. I thought maybe since they hadn’t won a conference game in five years, that no lead was safe. I might have tried one or two more plays to get a final touchdown going into the half.

Instead, Diehl told his quarterback to “take a knee” which kept the clock running and ended the half without another play. “Why?” I asked him. He looked at me like the answer was obvious. And it was to him. “We are not only teaching football,” Diehl said. “But (we’re) teaching the boys how to be good men and to be humble in victory in a game that has not done the same “(We’re) teaching the for us at times.” boys how to be good For the last two years Diehl’s taught his team to men and to be humble in victory in a game face defeat with courage. And his team responded, that has not done the coming back every week for same for us at times.” more. Unfortunately, they’ve had a lot of practice with that difficult lesson. Now, he’s teaching them a different one: Be humble in victory. And he hopes he has a lot more chances to teach his team that lesson. Based on what I saw Friday night, Diehl knows winning and losing in life is more than just what the scoreboard says. Halverson is interim sports editor of the Regional News.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Williams Bay/First conference win in five years Bonamarte was the leading receiver with 101 The only glaring weakness for the Bulldogs yards on 6 receptions. was its kick return team. Higgins was all over the field defensively Johnson Creek scored twice on kickoffs and racking up 15 tackles. Clark added 7; Olson, had several other long-gainers. Bonamarte, Frank Flores and VanVleet had four That left the visitors with a rather gaudy kick each. return average of 37.8 yards. Guss picked off a wobbly Johnson Creek pass Avery Lettenberger hit all six extra points and ran 45 yards for a TD. and a 21-yard field goal. Coach Derek Diehl put in a lot of ninth gradFor the year, Williams Bay has outscored its ers at the end of the game giving them experiopponents 100-74. ence and holding down the score. The Bulldogs host 0-3 Randolph in another Diehl On the last play of the game, several starters conference game at 7 p.m. Friday. came back in to stop Johnson Creek from crossing the Randolph fell 50-20 to Fall River in its conference goal line. opener.

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5C


6C

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

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Community & Commentary Thursday, September 12, 2013

Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters

D

First reaction to the parking study We had a short in-house discussion last week on whether our lead headline was editorializing: “No surprise, city needs more parking,” it said. We agreed it was like saying, “The sun is a yellow orb.” To say Lake Geneva needs more parking is a self-evident truth — or so we decided. I have to admit I had a knee-jerk response when I read that those were the findings of yet another study on the city’s parking: “Did we need to spend $26,325 to find that out?” Now let me back off a second. I’m not saying the money was ill spent — not yet at least. There was more nuance in the study than that headline implies. The city has already discovered some inaccuracies or misinterpretations that will require further consultation. And it is just a preliminary study, so out of fairness, we ought to wait for the next chapter before passing judgment. But I’m going to let fairness go by the wayside for a moment and

riff on some initial thoughts: I think the city council is wellintentioned in its desire to solve this perennial problem and felt that a fresh study beat a shoot-from-thehip approach. Right now, it seems like a close call. The most interesting aspect of the report was the suggestion that we need a parking structure. That does seem like an easy answer from an outsider’s approach, but I’ve had my doubts. First, it’s expected that such a structure would cost about $6 million. That’s a lot of money especially because, as it stands now, it would probably be nearly empty during

the six months or so when Lake Geneva’s resort traffic disappears. But maybe we have to look at the bigger picture. If that solves the downtown parking issue once and for all, maybe it’s worth it. The report indicated that the lack of parking is keeping locals away — and that’s part of a larger picture. If we look at the city’s downtown economy, getting locals back there is key. So is making Lake Geneva a vacation destination for 12 months a year, instead of five or six. If the parking structure got locals downtown and the city became more of a year-round destination, it would probably be costeffective. But, of course, it’s a chicken and egg proposition. If the city built it would they — the locals — come downtown? Should it be built betting the city will become a 12-month vacation paradise? The goal of making the city attractive to visitors all year ‘round,

will be one of the challenges of the new chamber head, who is expected to be hired in a couple of months. I do believe the city has winter charms that can be maximized beyond Winterfest and ice fishing. A Winterfest expansion is already in the works. The study suggested a good location for a parking structure would be adding to the Cook Street surface lot behind the old theater. That area is already partly owned by the city. And it’s close to downtown, unlike some of the other locations mentioned in the past. There is enough money in the TIF funds for a parking structure. Of course spending it, might get the anti-TIF people going. But unlike the skate park, for instance, a parking structure would clearly meet the TIF goal of improving downtown. Of course, the word “parking structure” creates visions of tall, gray cement industrial-looking monoliths. That’s not the image Lake Geneva sells. But they don’t have to be that way. They can be attractive.

The first floor could also feature stores that would incorporate the retail segment with the structure. Upon hearing of the location, I flashed back to a conversation I had with former mayor Spyro “Speedo” Condos a few months ago. Apparently, during his administration, that location was suggested for a parking structure and there were plans to buy adjoining properties to make it happen. He could be excused for saying “I told you so.” So, I’ll say it before he does. While the parking study still has a little time to be corrected and marinate, it’s healthy to keep on discussing it. Pretty soon the summer traffic will be gone and we might all be lulled to sleep. Let’s plumb everything we can from the study and then make some lasting decisions. Halverson is editor and general manager of the Lake Geneva Regional News.

PHOTOTORIAL

JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS

MORE WORDS. Simple Bakery has joined the Little Free Library movement. We noted the one on Spring Street a few weeks ago and Badger High School has one approved for Flat Iron Park. Shannon Gallagher of Simple Food Group said Simple’s structure is made from one of their old bakery cases. They were hand-crafted by carpenter Blair Muzzy. “We’ve still got some work to do in terms of getting the word out and getting more books cycling through there,” she said. “But it’s a fun addition!” And an educational one, too. — John Halverson, editor

Absent father, cerebral palsy, unmet needs Dear W.C.,

Dear readers,

My nine year old son struggles daily with his disability, cerebral palsy. I take him to physical therapy, his doctor, dentist, and other specialists. My car is in need of repairs. My husband left when he was 2-years-old due to the stress. He just could not handle that his son was disabled and would need a lifetime of care. I also have a 7-year-old daughter that I need to provide for. I have found myself unable to pay utilities and rent this month because my ex-husband has not paid his child support for the last two months. He has just started a new job and hopefully will be able to catch up going forward, but for now we cannot pay our bills. My son eats a special diet and needs medications and diapers. Could you please help us catch up on these bills? I try to not stress out over the constant care giving but the financial stress has me very worried. Stressed care-giving mom

Caring for a disabled child full-time is not easy for any parent or caregiver. When you have to worry about financial problems as well, it can easily overwhelm you. This caring mother was at her breaking point not only because of the constant hard work needed to keep her son as healthy as he can be, but due to the fact she had not received her child support for two months when the father had lost his job. When I spoke to the mother on the phone to arrange a visit she was very grateful to hear from us. We set up a meeting for the next day. The next day I arrived at their rental. They were renting a duplex that was handicap accessible. The door opened before I knocked as I noticed who must have been the seven year old daughter had been watching out the window for me along with her mother. After introductions, and identification was shown, she invited me inside. The mother introduced me to both her children. The son stricken with cerebral palsy was in a wheelchair.

The Lake Geneva Regional News — Serving the area for more than 140 years

I noted his speech was affected when he tried to speak. He was not mildly affected by cerebral palsy, as I had hoped. In the many years of helping poverty stricken handicapped children and adults, I have seen many cases of cerebral palsy. Some are more afflicted by symptoms than others. The mother spoke openly in front of her son, explaining his care and asking her son to answer some questions as well. His speech therapist encouraged this. He had to follow a special diet and needed help while eating. He shared with me his favorite foods. The mother spoke about how smart both her children were. She said, “I try to keep positive and be thankful for the blessings we have. I have to keep that frame of mind or I will not be able to be the best mother I can be for them.” The daughter sat next to her brother to read him books. The mother said this was one of their favorite activities. She said the sister’s voice seemed to soothe him and it was how they spent some favorite time together. We moved to sit just out of their hearing but close enough to keep a watchful eye on them. We went over her budget and financial problems. I looked over her overdue bills and we talked about her car repairs. When she was

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needed to help her son for a few moments, I went outside to take a look at her car. The tires were in terrible shape but the rest of the car was not that bad. The repairs it needed were very routine and shouldn’t be too expensive to complete. When I came back inside the mother was ready to finish our conversation. I asked about the father of the children. She was obviously not that happy with her exhusband. She said he was not involved in the day-to-day care of the son. He would take his daughter out every other weekend for a few hours, but never offered to help with his son. She said, “I wouldn’t trust him to care for our son properly anyway. He is too self-centered for that.” The mother said he had been paying his child support on time ever since the state enforced it over a year ago. Then he lost his job. He never offered to help out during the two months he was unemployed. The mother told me he had acquired another job since she wrote her letter for help. She was bold for her children and contacted his new employer. She had confirmed he was in fact now employed. She also confirmed her child support had started again.

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2D

The Regional News

September 12, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY LETTERS

Taggart disagrees with editor To the Editor: A comment on your last editorial as to the increase in salary or compensation paid to councilmen for their services to the city, your alarm sounding is somewhat overstated. To give an account of what has transpired: The councilmen have not had an increase in their remuneration since 2008. The future services paid by the city to the council members equates to approximately $1.34 a day. I would imagine with Taggart your skill and ability, as well as your increase in responsibility at the Regional News, you have had an increase in salary over the past five years significantly larger than $1.34 a day. The endless hours that the council devotes to their civic duties far outweighs the small consideration requested by them. Your writing indicates that we are to “give back” to our community. As I have been “giving back” to the community or my predecessors in name have “giving back” since 1883, I will not numerate the number of services I have “given back” since my graduation from high school in 1951. I will place a bet of small change that you could not match any portion of that in your “newbie” occupation and residency in Lake Geneva. Most respectfully submitted, Sturg Taggart Lake Geneva

Ryan not for amnesty To the Editor: I agree with Paul. Amnesty is not part of Paul Ryan’s plan to improve our nation’s illegal immigrant situation. I have personally spoken to the congressman and read his proposal. Paul Ryan, in my opinion, has laid out a sound road map for current and future methods for successful immigration policy. I believe Congressman Ryan’s recommendations are fair and equally transcend all national origins. Paul’s methodical plan calls for: 1 — Secure our national borders: “It is important that we develop a strategy to achieve operational control of the border-defined as stopping 90 percent of illegal border crossings with an independent verification process.” 2 — Enforcement: Entry/Exit Visa Tracking: ”Visa overstays make up about 40 percent of the undocumented immigrants in our country today. We also need a mandatory employment-verification system. We need to mandate the use of E-Verify.” 3 — Legal immigration: Guest-Worker Programs: ”We need to let immigrants come here legally.” 4 — A chance to get right with the law: “Pay a fine; pay back taxes; pass a background check. Those who don’t come forward must promptly leave the country or be immediately deported, no special pathway to citizenship. Democrats are insisting, give a fast track to citizenship. There already is a path to citizenship — it’s the legal immigration system. We shouldn’t offer citizenship on terms different from anyone else who wants to come here.” I agree with Congressman Ryan’s plan. To read Paul’s plan, go to paulryan.house.gov/issues. Chris Goebel Elkhorn

In appreciation of ‘hometown heroes’ Be concerned with cornerstones of To the Editor: democracy

On behalf of the city of Lake Geneva common council and mayor, as well as the members of the Lake Geneva Police and Fire Commission, we would like to sincerely thank our fire and police departments for all they do to serve and protect the Lake Geneva community. On Saturday, Sept. 7, the Lake Geneva Fire Department, led by Fire Chief Brent Connelly, Capt. Zina Opper, Capt. John Peters, Lt. Dennis Detkowski and several members of the department provided an all-day “behind the scenes” look into what the fire department does to keep our community safe. We want to thank them for the invitation, preparation and execution of a very thorough and informative day. We received an overview of what is involved in the life of a firefighter including hands-on experiences wearing protective equipment, fighting fires, use of equipment utilized to extricate someone in a vehicle and emergency medical procedures. It was amazing. Twelve years ago on Sept. 11, 2001, we learned the bravery of police officers, firefighters and emergency medical personnel as they responded to the attack on America in New York City and Washington, D.C. When emergencies occur needing the help of these professionals — as we run from danger — these trained professionals risk their lives as they run toward that danger to save lives and property. We appreciate our Hometown Heroes — police, fire and EMS personnel — who provide an extremely important service to all of us. Once again, a big thank you to the Lake Geneva Fire Department for providing us the insight as to what you do each day. Sincerely, and in appreciation, Jeff Wall, Lake Geneva Alderman, District 2 Dennis Lyon, Lake Geneva Alderman, District 4 Steve Madson, Police and Fire Commission, Vice President Mark Pienkos, Police and Fire Commission, President

To the Editor: The drumbeat of voter fraud is echoing across Wisconsin again. Walker’s legions have declared this a top legislative priority. This is occurring in spite of no elected official being in possession of evidence of voter fraud. Not a single legislator holds any evidence. Be concerned when continued falsehoods are offered to advance a political agenda. Redistricting (2012) was done in secret, without public input, controlled by and for one political party without regard for the interests of the people. Proposals have been advanced for a nonpartisan state agency to conduct future redistricting to insure unbiased voting districts. Newspaper editors across the state have endorsed public hearings on the proposed change. Republicans are refusing to allow public hearings and are letting the proposal languish in committees to die. Be concerned when legislators oppose fair elections and deny the will of the people. Wisconsin public schools have ranked among the best in the nation (ACT scores). Regardless, a statewide voucher system was instituted to help students escape failing public schools, particularly in disadvantaged areas. Sadly nearly 70 percent of the vouchers were directed to students already enrolled in private schools. The monies, coupled with tax credits, rewarded not the failed student, poor or otherwise, but those not in need of educational change. Be concerned when the dismantling of public education becomes your government’s policy. One party government, even if well intended, risks serving vested interests controlled by money-laden lobbyists, rather than public interests. Be very concerned when the cornerstones of democracy, fair elections, transparent government and public education are undermined. Jerry Hanson Elkhorn

FROM THE FILES

Time flies Sept. 16, 1993 Eastview School fourth grade student Brian Gustafson, 9, won a bicycle in the Walworth County Sheriff’s Association raffle at the Walworth County Fair. New members of the Lake Geneva Kiwanis Club are Linda Backhaus, Art Anderson and Marilyn D’Lugosz. Jo-Anne Bittner is the Geneva Lake Art Association artist of the month at the Lake Geneva Public Library, displaying paintings in oil and acrylic. Among those attending the 40th anniversary of the Lake Geneva High School Class of 1953 were Jane Brandley, Richard Thompson, Shirley Elsworth Scharine and Jerry Peyer. Junior class officers at Williams Bay High School are President Chris Luedtke, Vice President Jenna Contuchio, Secretary Jaime Cassin, Treasurer Brian Kist and Sheila Placido, student council representative.

Sept. 18, 2003 New teachers at St. Francis de Sales School, Lake Geneva, are Maggie McLaughlin, sixth grade, June Kaiser, sixth through eighth grade science, and Joe Hastreiter, eighth grade. Marianne Bestler is the new president of the Lake Geneva Garden Club. Dr. Bill Duncan accepted the Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Community Betterment Award on behalf of Aurora University, Williams Bay. The Genoa City Travel Center, Highway 12, planned an open house to recognize its 35th anniversary Sept. 26. Williams Bay High School Principal Dan Bice announced a student/ faculty group decided there will not be a homecoming parade. It will be replaced with other activities.

LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor must be signed by the writer, include a phone number and address in order to be considered for publication in the Lake Geneva Regional News. No names will be withheld. Letters emailed to the Regional News must contain a telephone number and address so the writer can be reached. They should be sent to jhalverson@lakegenevannews.net. The Regional News reserves the right to edit letters. Letters that are libelous, vulgar or profane will not be published. Poetry also will not be published. All decisions regarding this letters policy are at the discretion of the editor. The deadline for submitting a letter for any given week is 5 p.m. Friday.

Sidebars: The softer side of the county budget Of all of the holidays, Labor Day has become my least favorite. It is the weekend before I present the annual budget to the county board and, as a result, usually involves a weekend of labor as I place the finishing touches on next year’s spending plan. With most of the budget decisions made, my task is to summarize all of the numbers into a narrative that explains changes that are being proposed for the upcoming year. This narrative, which is called the budget transmittal letter, has grown in size over the years. It took me just six pages to describe the 2002 budget, the first one I prepared for the county. The 2013 letter was 22 pages long. I am sure I could be more concise, but the county budget is large. Even at its current length, I am only able to highlight major themes and significant changes. At one level, my Labor Day labor is self-imposed. There is no legal requirement for the letter. On the other hand, I don’t think it is fair to our county board members to simply drop off a stack of “green bar” computer printouts on their desk and expect them to make sense of all of the numbers. The letter gives them a head start on the two-month process that follows, which culminates in adoption of the budget on Nov. 12. I try to make the letter as reader-friendly as possible. There are limits, however, to just how

exciting I can make portions of the budget appear; the 30year amortization schedule of our OPEB obligation comes to mind. One tradition that grew out of my frustration with some of this very technical writing was to introduce “sidebar” articles to the budget. These articles describe individuals or events that may not even be related to the budget. The sidebars gave me a much-needed break from writing about all of the numbers and hopefully provided the same respite for those readers courageous enough to make it through the whole document. According to my archives, I first started adding the sidebars in 2006. Since then, I have used them to highlight outstanding employees, community leaders and important events in the history of the county. This year’s sidebars are a tribute to citizens who help govern the county by serving on our many committees, boards and commissions. Six of those citizen members were gracious enough to be interviewed by my administrative assistant, Tammy Werblow, who did an outstanding job writing this year’s stories. One of the risks of taking on a project like this is that space will only permit a small group to be included. There is always the chance that someone who was not chosen will be offended. I probably should have been more worried about this, but I really didn’t give the

selection process much thought. Given the high quality of the people we have serving in these roles, I picked the first six citizens that came to mind. I also know that those who weren’t chosen are not the kind of folks who hold a grudge. They work for nothing, or almost nothing, and are motivated to make the county a better place to live, not to be in the public spotlight. Citizen committee members highlighted in this year’s budget letter include:

Tom Cotter A long-time resident of East Troy and a retired educator, Tom has served on the Civil Service Board for 18 years. That board plays an important role in the selection and promotion of deputies.

Ella Pious In her ninth decade of life, Ella has been a faithful member of our Health & Human Services Board for 22 years.

Mariette Nowak A passionate nature lover, Mariette directed the Milwaukee County Nature Center before becoming an early member of our Park Committee.

Ann Seaver When she is not busy with her duties as the Richmond Town Treasurer, Ann serves on the County Board of Adjustment.

Royce DeBow Active in local government issues for years, Royce is a past president and current member of the Lakeshores Library System Board.

Rich Kuhkne Fortunately for the county, after Rich retired as a County Board Supervisor, he joined our Zoning Agency as a citizen member. Shortly after they are released to our supervisors, important budget documents are posted on the county’s website, www. co.walworth.wi.us. If you follow the links for “Departments” and then “Finance Department” you will find the county administrator’s budget, including the transmittal letter. If you need a break from reading about all of the numbers, I would encourage you to read the full profiles of the citizen committee members mentioned in this column. Better yet, if you think you might be interested in serving on a committee, we recently rolled out a new web page devoted to the topic. Opportunities for service will be posted throughout the year. You can find the information on the county home page listed above; just follow the “Citizen Committee Members” link. The opinions expressed in this column are those of the author and not necessarily those of the Walworth County Board of Supervisors.


September 12, 2013

The Regional News

3D

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY DEATH NOTICES

OBITUARIES

Effie E. Emerson, 95, Walworth, died Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013, at Golden Years in Walworth. Visitation was from 9:30 to 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 7, at First United Methodist Church, Harvard, Ill., with the funeral at 11 a.m., officiated by the Rev. Dan Davis. Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the First United Methodist Church in Harvard. Doris M. Fidler, 91, Walworth, died Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Golden Years Health Care Center, Walworth. No services planned at this time. The Toynton Walworth Funeral Home assisted the family with arrangements.

John P. Habrel, 86, Genoa City, died Tuesday morning, Sept. 3, 2013, at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee. Mass of Christian burial was at 10 a.m., Saturday Sept. 7, at St. John’s Catholic Church in Twin Lakes. Visitation from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home and Crematory in Genoa City. Memorial remembrances may be made to the Village Garden Club of Genoa City or the Genoa City Lions Club. Faith Anne Cech Liechty,

85, Hono-

lulu, Hawaii, died peacefully on Feb. 7, 2013.

Richard Harvey Olson, 79, Lake Geneva, died Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Village Glen Arbor Village after a long illness. Funeral services at 11 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 12, at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Peter Metzger officiating. Burial at Oak Hill Cemetery. Visitation from 4 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 11, at the Steinke Funeral Home, Lake Geneva. Memorials may be given to the First Evangelical Lutheran Church or Aurora VNA Hospice. Raymond E. Rorie, 88, Union Grove, formerly of Burlington, died Saturday morning, Sept. 7, 2013, at the Wisconsin Veteran’s Home in Union Grove. Funeral services at 2 p.m., Saturday Sept. 14, at the Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home in Twin Lakes. Interment with military honors in Mound Prairie Cemetery. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. For online guestbook, go to haaselockwoodfhs.com.

When dreams end “You are always the same age inside.” Gertrude Stein The gentleman ahead of me walked with some difficulty. Quickly overtaking him, I became aware he had a number of physical problems. As we greeted each other, the one aspect of his being that appeared in full strength was the stentorian voice. It boomed with vigor. We proceeded to have a stimulating conversation. I had to adjust my stride, but the voice and its content streaming forth justified any change. But I had to get where I was going and so did he. The talk ceased and we resumed our original gaits. He said he was sorry if his 70 years had caused any inconvenience. I don’t usually hesitate to exchange declarations of age with other elders but this time I did. I was afraid declaring my four score and six might cause some consternation. I have since reviewed that chance meeting, and I wonder how and why life takes us in such different directions. We complicate by counting the years and worrying about whether we made a difference or not. I say we are not old until regrets replace dreams. That vigorous voice, the brief walking talk, and now the memories. Some summary of life, is it not? Johnson is a former Badger High School English

COMMUNITY NOTE Immanuel Lutheran Bible study groups Autumn brings small group Bible studies to the schedule at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 1229 Park Row, Lake Geneva. Two spirit growth campaigns will be available. Becoming Who God Says You Are began the week of Sept. 8 and finishes the week of Oct. 6. This five-week dynamic study is by nationally recognized author Craig Groschel. He writes, “You are not who others think you are. You are not even who you think you are. Take your idea of your own identity; lay it down on the altar, and sacrifice it. Why? Because you are who God says you are. Until you’ve sacrificed your broken concept of your identity, you won’t become who you are meant to be.” The second study, You’ll Get Through This: Hope and Help for Your Turbulent

Times, begins the week of Oct. 13 and will be done the week of Nov. 17. This brand new six-session study is by internationally acclaimed author Max Lucado. He said, “You fear you won’t make it through. We all do. We fear that the depression will never lift, the yelling will never stop, the pain will never leave. In the pits, surrounded by steep walls and aching reminders, we wonder: Will this gray sky ever brighten? This load ever lighten?” Both studies will be available throughout the week, at a variety of times and locations. There is a group for everyone. The participant’s guide includes notes for the video teaching, Biblical texts, discussion questions, and personal studies. Video presentations by both authors will offer superb teachings to spark conversations. Contact the church for scheduled groups or to host a group at (262) 248-4211.

Faith Anne Cech Liechty Aug. 8, 1927 - Feb. 7, 2013 Faith Anne Cech Liechty, 85, Honolulu, Hawaii, died peacefully on Feb. 7, 2013. She was born Aug. 8, 1927, in Cicero, Ill., the daughter of Dr. George H. Cech and Sylvia Marie Pergler Cech. Faith studied at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, where she was a Delta Gamma. She married Eugene “Gene” Liechty in 1948. Gene died in 1994. She lived in Lake Geneva until 2000, when she moved to Honolulu to be with her children. Faith’s family will miss her love, strength, good humor and endless, beautiful needlepoint projects. She is survived by her three children, Margaret “Peggy” (Richard) Friedman, Barbara Liechty and George “Bucky” (Arlene) Liechty; and three grandchildren, Elizabeth, Meredith and Matthew (Jenna). Private graveside services to be held in September. The family requested donations to a hospice of one’s choice. Aloha. Steinke Funeral Home and Cremation Services assisted the family with arrangements. For online guest registry, go to www.steinkefuneralhomeinc.com.

Doris M. Fidler Aug. 29, 1922 - Sept. 6, 2013 Doris M. Fidler, 91, Walworth, passed away Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Golden Years Health Care Center in Walworth. She was born August 29, 1922, in Austin, Ill., the daughter of Robert T. and Cora Larson Hagg. She married Ralph S. Fidler Nov. 16, 1946, in Marengo, Ill. He preceded he in death April 6, 2004. Doris was a registered nurse with more than 30 years of service. She was a member of Linn Presbyterian Church, Lake Geneva. She is survived by a daughter, Christine Anderson; two sons, Peter Fidler and Thomas Fidler; grandchildren, Ben Anderson, Eli Anderson, Kelley Leach and Ashley Fidler; and great-grandchildren, Hayden Leach, MacKenzie Leach, Louisa Anderson and Eli Leach. No services planned at this time. The Toynton Walworth Funeral Home assisted the family with arrangements.

Richard Harvey Olson Aug. 3, 1934 - Sept. 6, 2013

John P. Habrel April 28, 1927 - Sept. 3, 2013 John Paul Habrel, 86, Genoa City, died Tuesday morning, Sept. 3, 2013, at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee. He was born in Chicago on April 28, 1927, the son of the late Thomas and Mary Kustak Habrel. On October 23,1948, in Genoa City, he married Norma Jean Schwandt. He moved from Chicago to Genoa City in 1946. John served in the U.S. Navy during WWII and Korea. He started Habrel Builders in 1963 and started Habrel Subdivision on Sterling Drive in Genoa City in 1974. He built many additions and many remodel jobs in the Genoa City area. He was an assistant Cub Scout Master and past commander and member of the Sponholtz-Deignan American Legion Post 183 in Genoa City. John is survived by his wife, Norma; two sons, Gene (Barb), Lake Geneva, and Eric (Nancy), Genesee Township; six grandchildren, Chris (Tracy) Habrel, Kim Habrel, Katie Habrel, Mike Habrel, Aaron Habrel and Laura Habrel; a great-grandson, Harrison John Habrel; a great-granddaughter, Norah Katherine Habrel; and many loving nieces, nephews, brothers and sisters-in-law. He will be greatly missed by his wife, sons and their families. He was preceded in death by his parents; a son, Mark; four brothers, Robert, William, Edward and George; and two sisters, Dorothy (Ted) Samocki and Bernice (Marvin) Klaas. Mass of Christian burial at 10 a.m., Saturday Sept. 7, at St. John’s Catholic Church in Twin Lakes (meet at church). Visitation from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home and Crematory in Genoa City. Memorial remembrances may be made to the Village Garden Club of Genoa City or the Genoa City Lions Club. For online guestbook, go to haaselockwoodfhs.com.

Effie E. Emerson June 30, 1918 - Sept. 4, 2013 Effie E. Emerson, 95, Walworth, died Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013, at Golden Years in Walworth. She was born June 30, 1918, in Wyoming, Ill., to Orva and Cora Wasem Crone. Effie’s parents moved to Big Foot, Ill., and bought a farm when she was 3 years old. She had lived in the area for the remainder of her life. On Aug. 15, 1945, she married Edward J. Emerson in Kahoka, Mo. They had 51 wonderful years together. Effie graduated Harvard High School in 1935. She was a bookkeeper for Illinois Northern Utility Co. in Harvard for 12 years, and a school treasurer for Harvard District 50 for three years. She and Ed opened Harvard Plumbing and Heating in 1968, where she did all the bookkeeping. She was a member of the Harvard United Methodist Church since 1935. She had been a Sunday school teacher for several years and served on various committees. Effie was a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, Harvard Historical Society and a former volunteer of the Harvard Hospital Auxiliary and life member. She was also a Brownie and chorus leader. She enjoyed going to craft fairs with her friends and working on her home and her flowers. She especially enjoyed spending time with her daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren, who were very special to her. She is survived by one daughter, Beverly (Tom) Eck; two grandchildren, Christopher Ned (Jenny) Eck and Calie Elizabeth; three sisters-in-law, Anne (Bud) Behrens, St. Paul, Minn., Lydia Crone, Sun City, Fla., and Carolyn Crone, Kansas City, Mo.; and many nieces, nephews and special friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; and four brothers, Paul, Ralph, Lawrence, and David. Visitation was from 9:30 to 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 7, at First United Methodist Church, Harvard, Ill., with the funeral at 11 a.m., officiated by the Rev. Dan Davis. Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the First United Methodist Church in Harvard. To leave condolences, go to saundersmcfarlin. net.

Your link to the community.

Richard Harvey Olson, 79, Lake Geneva, died Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Village Glen Arbor Village after a long illness. He was born Aug. 3, 1934, in Chemung Township, McHenry County, Ill., the son of Harvey and Nina Gallup Olson. He married Cleta J. Dillard in December 1956 in Harvard, Ill. Their marriage was blessed with three daughters. He married Carolee Clausen Smith on Oct. 19, 1974. He worked in the electrical trade for Arthur Gallup and Bogart Electric. Later he became an electrician with IBEW Local 890 for more than 30 years, retiring in 1994. He was a member of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lake Geneva, and IBEW Local 890, and a lifetime member of Big Foot Archers, Lake Geneva, and Blackhawk Archers, Rockton, Ill. He loved bow hunting and working with his hands. When he was young he did a lot of leather tooling. Richard is survived by his wife, Carolee; his children, Angela Carter and Jana (Manuel Hernandez) Olson; his stepdaughter, Lori (Michael) Long; a granddaughter, Alexandria Hernandez; stepgrandchildren, Freybrianne (John Ecklund) Ziervogel, Ezekiel Ziervogel, Adam (Iona) Basso, Brandon Basso and Faith Long; stepgreat-grandchildren, Isaac Ziervogel, Calvin and Lynden Ecklund; his sister, Darlene Mangan; a stepbrother, Richard (Clare) Olson; a stepsister, Arlene (Cleo) Flegel; and several brothers- and sisters-in-law. He was preceded in death by his father, Harvey Olson; his mother and stepfather, Nina and Reuben Olson; his daughter, Pamela Olson; his stepdaughter, Lynn Ziervogel; a stepgreat-grandson, Michael Long Jr.; two brothers, David and Daniel Olson; two sisters, Agnes Olson and Dorothy Staab; one stepbrother, Virgil Olson; several brothers- and sisters-in-law; and many other relatives and friends.. Funeral services at 11 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 12, at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Peter Metzger officiating. Burial at Oak Hill Cemetery. Visitation from 4 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 11, at the Steinke Funeral Home, Lake Geneva. Memorials may be given to the First Evangelical Lutheran Church or Aurora VNA Hospice. For guest registry, go to www.steinkefuneralhome.inc.

Crying can be an important part of the grieving process, but not always. Your response to grief may be different. It’s OK if you don’t shed tears. You may simply need time and space to grieve in your own way. The grieving process commands respect and requires time. We are here to help your family make the adjustment.


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The Regional News

September 12, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY

UPCOMING ATTRACTIONS

SEPT. 14

SEPT.26

SEPT. 29

The Taste of Lake Geneva celebration will be in Flatiron Park, Wrigley Drive and Center Street, on the shore of Geneva Lake. The event will feature food tents from the area’s finest dining establishments, along with entertainment and a “Plaid Party” at the Madras Lounge. Scheduled from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Taste will also include beer from the Lake Geneva Brewing Co., Sprecher’s and New Glarus. A boutique wine tasting will be offered as well. Entertainment from Neil Diamond impersonator Paul Evansen and the Badger High School Jazz Ensemble is planned. Admittance to the Madras Lounge is $5 and suggested donation for general admission is $2. Visit the Facebook page for more information.

Families and people of all ages are invited to attend the Lake Geneva Public Library’s monthly “Family Movie Nights.” The Library will show the newly-released movie “Epic” from 6 to 8 p.m. Movie nights feature familyfriendly films especially appropriate for children aged 4 to 11, accompanied by an adult. The library is located at 918 Main St. There is no charge. Visit www.lakegeneva.lib.wi.us for more.

The Lake Geneva Chapter, Lyric Opera of Chicago invites members, guests and friends to attend its “Golden Days of Fall” event. Festivities begin with registration at 4 p.m. and a performance at 4:30 p.m. at Big Foot Country Club, 770 Shabbona Drive, Fontana. Following the performance, refreshments will be served. Cash bar is also available. Cost is $80 for members and $100 for guests. RSVP by Sept. 18 as space is limited. For more information on reservations or membership, contact Marvin Herman at (262) 740-1705.

Ongoing St. Francis de Sales, 148 W. Main St., Lake Geneva, hosts bingo on the first and third Wednesdays of the month. More than $1,000 in cash prizes including progressive Jackpot and pull-tabs. Doors and concessions open at 6 p.m. Bingo starts at 7 p.m. For more information, call (262) 248-8524. The Lake Geneva Farmers Market is held on Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Horticultural Hall, 330 Broad St. Vendors line the sidewalk and also fill the hall, offering fresh produce, garden plants, arts and crafts and more. Geneva Lake Area Museum, 255 Mill St. Located in the city’s former Power & Light building, the facility features a historic Main Street, which includes a log cabin, a blacksmith, a general store, dentist, residences, a school and more.

Visit ReelLifeTV.net for video specials on upcoming events and year-round activities in the Geneva Lake area.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D

Time Is Now/Mother thankful for help with rent, auto repair I complimented her on her follow through. I commended the mother on her excellent care-giving skills. The children were obviously well cared for and the house was clean. The mother had tears in her eyes as she said, “You have no idea how much that means to me. No one ever tells me that I am doing a good job. It is just good to hear.” I asked if she belonged to any support groups and was happy to hear she had just joined one being held at one of the son’s therapist

groups. I knew it would be good for her to meet people going through the same day-to-day life. We brought the mother’s rent and utilities up to date. We purchased new tires and had the repairs completed on her car. I even brought over a few books for the children to read together. The last time we spoke the mother shared her thankfulness for The Time Is Now to Help. She was also grateful for joining the support group and the new friends she was

making there. She was happy to report they had even gone on a group field trip. She said it was the most normal she had felt in several years. The other parents had many resources and ideas to share with her. I am grateful we were able to help this family get back on track and see some joy on the mother and children’s faces. Together, we will continue to replace the fear, pain and suffering of poverty, with compassion, healing, caring and sharing with our hearts to change lives. Thank you for helping us achieve God’s good works for those in desperate need. Health and happiness, God bless everyone, W.C./Sal

Mailing address

get peace of mind

Make checks payable to: The Time Is Now to Help P.O. Box 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 The Time Is Now to Help is a federally recognized 501(c)3 charitable organization licensed in the states of Wisconsin and Illinois. You will receive a tax deductible,

itemized thank you receipt showing how your donation provided assistance for the poverty stricken.

Thanks Pentair Foundation, Kunes’ Country Chevrolet-Cadillac, Fox Charities, Paul Ziegler, Lake Geneva School of Cooking, Chef John Bogan, Dick and Jean Honeyager, Katie Alder, Lake Geneva Area Realty, Jim and Ardith Drescher, Clarence and Marilyn Schawk, Martin Group, John Stensland and Family, ITW Foundation, Sid and Patty Johnson, Michael Glass, James and Marilynn Dyer, Albert and Ellen Burnell, Richard and Carol Hinners, Sylvester and Virginina Seick, Edward and Kathryn Drexler, Walter and Florence Strumpf, David and Mary Riesland, Barbara Popenhagen, David and Wallie Leitzke, Mike and Margaret Rifken, John Poiron, Fairfield Grange No. 679, Steve Thornton, Raymond and Jeanne Kolnik, W.C. Family Resource Center/Food Pantry volunteers, and all the God loving volunteers of all our caring

food pantries, all of you who support The Time Is Now to Help donation boxes, and the businesses that allow our donation boxes. Anyone who would like a Time Is Now donation box in your business, please call (262) 249-7000.

Honoraries Dan and Maureen Winkler in honor of Barb Giovanonni’s 75th Birthday.

Memorials Clarita Abell, family and friends in loving memory of Wally Abell.

Furniture donations Please contact us direct for any furniture, appliance or any item donations. (262) 249-7000 If you would like to donate your items to The Time Is Now to Help please email info@timeisnowtohelp.org, message us on Facebook.com/thetimeisnowtohelp or call (262) 2497000. Thank you and God bless you.

Please visit www.timeisnowtohelp.org

COMMUNITY NOTES Harvest Dinner Sept. 25 Delavan United Methodist Church, 213 S. 2nd St. Delavan, is hosting their Harvest Dinner on Wednesday, Sept. 25, from 5 to 7 p.m. Turkey, biscuits, squash, beans, jello salad, pie and beverages will be served. Advance tickets for adults are $10 and children ages 6-12 $6. At the door, tickets for adults are $11 and children ages 6-12 are $7. All children under 6 years old are free. Carryouts are available, and the church is now handicap accessible and air conditioned! For advance ticket information or to order pickups ahead, call (262) 728-3644.

Bay collects electronics If it’s got a plug but it won’t play, the Williams Bay junior and senior high school student councils have a place for it. The students are sponsoring an electronics recycling pick-up from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 28 at the high school parking lot, 500 W. Geneva St., Williams Bay. Anything that plugs into a wall, or runs on batteries, will be collected and then shipped to D.P. Electronic, Elkhorn, for recycling. The program will even take appliances. Hard drives on computers will be wiped to U.S. Department of Defense standards. This is the third year for the electronics recycling drive, Charlie Mestek, Williams Bay High School at-risk coordinator, said. The student councils collect one cent per pound of electronics dropped off at the pick-up, he said. In 2011, the program collected 22,160 pounds of electronics. In 2012, it collected about 38,000 pounds, Mestek said. The goal this year is 40,000 pounds, he said.

GLAA watercolor class begins Sept. 12 Nancy Newcomb, Lake Geneva, will lead a watercolor class beginning Thursday, Sept. 12, from 9 a.m. until noon at the Geneva Lake Art Association Gallery, 647 N. Main St., Lake Geneva. The 10-week session will explore the versatility of watercolor painting, using the autumn season as inspiration. Demos, slides, videos and critiques will augment classroom teaching. Participants may join in whenever possible. The cost is $15 per session. Class size is limited to 12. Contact Newcomb for information or to sign up at (262) 248-6344.


September 12, 2013

The Regional News

5D

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY ZUCCHINI RELISH

GARDEN VEGETABLE SOUP

10 cups ground zucchini 4 cups ground onion 5 tablespoons salt 2 1/4 cups vinegar 4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon nutmeg 1 tablespoon turmeric 1 tablespoon celery seed 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 tablespoon dry mustard 2 green peppers, chopped fine 2 red peppers, chopped fine Combine squash, onions and salt in large non-reactive container; stir well and let stand overnight. Drain; rinse in cold water and drain mixture in cheesecloth bag until very dry. In large dutch oven, combine squash with remaining ingredients. Heat to boiling; reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. Pour into sterilized jars or freezer containers; store accordingly. Makes seven pints. SPINACH LASAGNA PINWHEELS 12 lasagna noodles, cooked and drained 1 pound fresh spinach, cooked and drained (or two 10-ounce packages frozen spinach) 2 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley Salt, pepper and garlic salt, to taste 1 pound Monterey jack cheese, shredded 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 tablespoons melted margarine Chop spinach and combine with ricotta cheese, eggs and seasonings. Spoon mixture in thin layer on each noodle; roll up and place each roll, seam side down, in greased 9-by-13-inch pan. Sprinkle with remaining cheeses. Drizzle top with melted margarine. Bake at 350 for 30 to 45 minutes. Serves eight to 10.

Fresh vegetables need very little done to them before serving as their flavors are enjoyable without much fussing. “The Garden Cart” is a vegetarian cookbook, on loan from a daughter, and is filled with simple enhancement for the garden’s bounty, including these recipes. Another way to enjoy the produce is to shop at the local farmer’s market or roadside stand. Zucchini Relish uses up several squash, a convenient way to keep up with the prolific vegetable. Onion, nutmeg, turmeric, celery seed and green and red peppers are among the ingredients. The two-step process is not difficult to accomplish. Potatoes, turnips, celery, carrots, parsley, barley and shredded cabbage join with tomatoes and onions to become Garden Vegetable Soup. In an unusual method, the cabbage is placed in the soup bowl raw, then wilted when the hot soup is added. Spinach Lasagna Pinwheels make up into neat green and white individual servings. They can be prepared early and are ready to cook when needed. Fresh or frozen spinach, eggs, ricotta, Parmesan and Monterey jack cheeses are among the ingredients. Foil packages cook on the grill or in the oven to create Carrot Bake. Onion, raisins, if desired, apple, honey and sunflower seeds cook with the vegetables, making a “new” dish to serve at the next cookout.

3 quarts tomatoes, peeled and quartered 1 quart water 2 tablespoons parsley flakes 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon thyme 1 teaspoon ground cloves Salt and pepper to taste 1 cup chopped onion 1 cup sliced celery 2 cups sliced carrots 2 cups cubed turnips 3 cups cubed potatoes 1/2 cup barley 3 cups shredded cabbage Put all ingredients except barley and cabbage in soup pot and bring to a boil. Simmer about 20 minutes; add barley and cook until barley is done, about 45 minutes. Adjust seasoning and remove bay leaf. Place three to four tablespoons shredded cabbage in each bowl and ladle hot soup into bowl. Serve with hot corn bread. Makes eight to 10 servings. CARROT BAKE 8 carrots 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup raisins, optional 1 apple, cored and cubed 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons sunflower seeds Scrub carrots and cut into strips. Spray a large sheet of heavy aluminum foil and place carrots on bottom. Add other ingredients and fold tightly into package. Grill about 40 minutes over medium heat, turning package carefully once or twice. May be baked at 375 degrees about the same length of time.

COMMUNITY EVENT Black Point hosts special tour The Black Point Estate will present a new program on Fridays, Oct. 4 and 18, at the Wisconsin Historic Site on the lake. “Death and Dying in the Victorian Era” has been developed, featuring a presentation on Victorian funeral and mourning customs, a tour of the first floor of the house and a narrated lake boat tour of maritime mishaps on the Geneva Lake Cruise Line. Black Point

docent Steve Person, who by day is a funeral director in Walworth, will guide the tour. Tickets for the tour are $40 and can be purchased through the Geneva Lake Cruise Line, (262) 248-6206. The tour departs from the Riviera boat dock at 4:30 p.m. each day, and returns to the pier about 7 p.m. Attendance is limited to 50 people for each tour. Black Point Estate is a Queen Anne Victorian summer cottage, built in 1888, approached only by boat and the long staircase built at the

time the cottage was erected. During the Victorian era, the ritual of death became increasingly sophisticated and public. Parlor funerals, post-mortem death photographs, hair wreaths, public mourning and seances all became accepted practices. The period saw the development of the modern cemetery, morticians and public funerals, complete with floral arrangements and hearse transportation of the deceased. “One of the greatest challenges for historic

house museums is creating new and different programs for repeat visitors,” Estate Director David Desimone said. “While this program is building upon the rise in popularity of Halloween, we will remain true to our mission of sharing historically accurate stories so you won’t hear any ghost tales at this one.” Regular tours of the estate will continue through Oct. 31 at 10:30 a.m. A second tour at 12:30 p.m. is available on Saturdays and Sundays.


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The Regional News

September 12, 2013

Thank You from the Lake Geneva Jaycees! Thanks to the following people and organizations for supporting us during our 51st annual Venetian Festival A Special Thank You to Our Sponsors

The Downtown Lake Geneva Business Improvement District

ADDITIONAL SPONSORS:

Larry’s Towing and Recovery Aquaman Pool and Spa Pat’s Services Lake Geneva Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery American Satellite Speigelhoff & Associates ome Steinke Funeral Ho

Bittner’s Bakery Chamberlain and Henningfield Kikkoman Foods Leather Lips Austin Pier Service Lake Geneva Canopy Tours Pet Loss at Home

OTHER SUPPORTERS: Lake Geneva City Council Lake Geneva Cruise Line City of Lake Geneva Police Lake Geneva Fire & Rescue Lake Geneva Street Dept. Mayor Jim Connors City Administrator Dennis Jordan Chief Mike Rasmussen Russ Carstensen Ron Carstensen Asst. Chief Mike Reuss

Lt. Ed Gritzner Lake Geneva Park Commission Fire Chief Brent Connelly Geneva Lake Water Police Water Safety Patrol Harold Friestad Sturg Taggart Chamber of Commerce Staff Downtown Merchants Residents of Geneva Towers Joe Clifford’s Beach Staff

Walworth County Dept. of Public Works Legion Baseball Team Sgt. Dan Derrick Dunn Lumber True Value Hardware Big Foot Lions Club Walworth County Visitors Bureau Pody Door Lake Geneva Water Dept. Dan Winkler Lake Geneva Beautification Committee John Nish

Ted Peters Spiegelhoff Insurance Grandma Vickies Cafe Bella Mia, Inc. American Satellite - TV & Satellite Feed The Citizens of Lake Geneva Captain John Peters Lake Geneva Wrestling Lake Geneva Park Board

AND LAKE GENEVA JAYCEE FAMILY & FRIENDS

Thank you to all current and past members of the Lake Geneva Jaycees for their commitment and contributions to the Jaycees, Venetian Festival and the City of Lake Geneva

Thank you to the City of Lake Geneva and citizens for your continued support!


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