Page 25

ENERGY CONSUMPTION Challenges While this all sounds good, actual execution isn’t easy. Successful hybrid cloud implementation assumes a well-architected private cloud as opposed to simply a well-built traditional IT infrastructure. This means that adoption of hybrid cloud starts with the transition from a traditional on-premise environment to one that includes concepts and supporting technologies that enable functionality normally associated with public cloud – self-provisioning for application owners, dynamic resource scaling, a charge back model for lines of business, orchestration for automating repeatable tasks and a high-visibility management platform to monitor how and where services get deployed. It’s the familiarity with the very nature of the public cloud model that has fuelled the business and technical requirements in the enterprise for essentially, an IT-as-a-Service framework that allows for agile self-service, provisioning and consumption monitoring, while simplifying the load on application owners. Because on-premise legacy data centre environments were not built with these principles in mind, transitioning can be a challenge. Hybrid cloud also opens the possibility for workload overflow processing or cloud bursting so that applications can bring up new instances as needed in the public part of the hybrid cloud once data centre capacity is reached. Load balancing instances, among other dynamic, virtualised network functions, is a core enabler to make service assurance and optimised delivery possible. However, without application delivery controller (ADC) technology running natively in the cloud, virtualisation admins can find it challenging to deterministically know where data centre capacity exhausts and how much external resources will need to be consumed in varying scenarios for proper planning. Additionally, applications actually built with the capabilities to traverse public and private cloud boundaries bring about the additional challenges of ensuring that the underlying data is in the right place at the right time, as well as dealing with enforcement of the same governance and security policies regardless of where active instances are operating. Where is it all heading? Fortunately, these challenges are not insurmountable. Cloud-focused security solutions with the capability of propagating a unified set of policies across cloud borders have come onto the market. Technology leaders such as VMware, Microsoft and IBM have launched many new offerings to help companies build better private clouds and extend the benefits of a virtualised infrastructure beyond the on-premise data centre. And finally, advancements in application delivery technology have made possible the use of complex traffic steering algorithms across a fabric of private and

public clouds based on business rules that dictate how company resources should be consumed. These enablers all have driven the adoption of a hybrid cloud strategy in the enterprise and the outlook is positive. Modern IT delivery’s need for increased agility, rapid provisioning of innovative applications and focus on quickest time to market of applications coupled with the current gap left by an all-in public cloud model all mean one thing hybrid cloud is here to stay.

Cloud load balancing revealed An Application Delivery Controller (ADC) directly assists in the management of client connections to enterprise and web-based applications. ADCs are normally deployed behind firewalls and in front of application servers and make networks and applications more efficient by managing the processing of traffic shaping and distribution. The ADC directs client access requests to the best performing servers based on factors such as concurrent connections, CPU load and memory utilisation. This makes sure that bottlenecks do not occur to reduce performance; and if a server or application fails, the user is automatically re-routed to another functioning server. This process is seamless to the user and critical to delivering an optimised and reliable experience. When it comes to the private, public or hybrid clouds, ADCs ensure the availability of applications while maximising performance, regardless of the user location or device. In a hybrid-cloud environment, traffic running at normal levels is directed to dedicated, optimised application servers. However, when traffic spikes occur, the load balancers will direct this ‘spill over’ to servers that can be located on public cloud. In some hybrid cloud environments, dependencies between cloud and on-premise devices may also exist. The high availability of ADFS Servers delivered through a load balancer can provide guaranteed access to on-premise Active Directory servers for MS-Office365, for example. Cloud balancing simply increases the choices from where a given application should be delivered and can make application routing

decisions based on a wider range of network as well as business variables, such as the ability to meet a SLA or the value of a transaction based on a per user or customer basis. Other criteria could include user location, time of day, regulatory compliance, energy consumption and contractual obligations. When it comes to load balancing and traffic management across public cloud providers, it is important to consider some of the inherent limitations. For example, the built-in load balancer provided in Microsoft Azure does not offer Application Layer (Layer 7) visibility to provide the best level of service to users. While basic Layer 4 balancing directs traffic based largely on server response times, Layer 7 switching uses application-layer criteria to determine where to send a request to provide more granular control. This leads to an improvement in the utilisation of data and application traffic management and at the same time allows the virtual machines to be used more effectively. It is possible to deploy a third-party Layer 7 virtual load balancer that runs directly on the cloud platform rather than just directing traffic to the cloud network. Deploying a virtual ADC with an application in the cloud ensures that the organisation is able to monitor and manage the health of the application and make global routing decisions to deliver optimum performance and resilience. A virtual ADC can also provide a platform for global load balancing and DNS routing to enable internal and external cloud implementations to behave as if one single network. www.kemptechnologies.com

CLOUDCOMPUTING 25

Profile for LGN Media

Cloud Computing World Vol 1 Iss 1-Aug 2014  

CCW is the UKs first digital publication totally dedicated to the subject of cloud computing. CCW reaches an audience of over 15,000 individ...

Cloud Computing World Vol 1 Iss 1-Aug 2014  

CCW is the UKs first digital publication totally dedicated to the subject of cloud computing. CCW reaches an audience of over 15,000 individ...

Profile for lgnmedia
Advertisement