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graduate

temporary installations

undergraduate


contents


kinetic enclosure Seattle, WA

Professors | Maurya McClintock + Rob Pena Team Member | Lauren McWhorter

supportive exchange Seattle, WA

Professors | Jim Nicholls + Nancy Rottle Team Members | Donny Donahue + Stephanie Farrell + Connor Irick

nocturnal kinespheres Seattle, WA

Professor | Vikram Prakash


graduate


Starting with a given building concept, program, and massing; the focus of this project was solely on the enclosure systems. The building is a vertical start-up tower with three major program types running vertically throughout the tower with rhythmic breaks for social interaction. The tower comprises of a residential core to the east, an office core to the west, and shared atriums nested in between and out to the south-west corner. The essence of the project is a vertical neighborhood. Given the program of the building, an overarching idea of kinetic skins emerged as an appropriate way to respond to the environment while providing ownership and user identity along the facade. This was achieved in each program type though proposing solutions that touched upon seemingly complex systems through simple modules, allow for customization of the facade itself, and relating to nature, both as a tool and an experience integral to human happiness.

LM

In collaboration with Lauren McWhorter

SIMPLE COMPLEXITY

OWNERSHIP & IDENTITY

Matt Fuhr

CONNECTION TO NATURE LM


kinetic enclosure


SIMPLE COMPLEXITY 5’

16’

PERFORATED MODULAR TILE

MODULAR PANELIZED SHADING SYSTEM

OWNERSHIP & IDENTITY 1. glare control

2. closed mode

3. views to city

4. organic patterns

LM

CONNECTION TO NATURE

ORGANIC PANEL DIVERSITY

WINTER CONDITION

SUMMER CONDITION


office

In collaboration with Lauren McWhorter


1" 84 4"

10"

7" 68

10"

4"

2'-4"

1" 64

1" 2'-72

2'-0"

PANELIZED DOUBLE SKIN CURTAIN WALL DETAIL: SECTION in collaboration with Lauren McWhorter

1" 84

4"

2'-0"


office

office exterior: fixed position mode

office interior in late morning


SIMPLE COMPLEXITY

MODULAR POLYCARB TILES

FLOWING SCREEN PARTITIONS

OWNERSHIP & IDENTITY

RETRACTIBLE BALCONY SYSTEM

CONNECTION TO NATURE

tiles rotate in wind for organic feeling of leaves in units and interstitial floors


residential


RESIDENTIAL SEGMENT RETRACTIBLE BALCONY DETAIL: PLAN

RETRACTIBLE BALCONY DETAIL: SECTION

WALL SECTION


RESIDENTIAL UNIT INTERIOR

BALCONY

residential

RESIDENTIAL POD EXTERIOR


Located in the knuckle of several dynamically different districts in Seattle, this site along Yesler Way finds itself in the crossroads of supporting its existing community and preparing for future ones to come. The proposal illustrated here embraces the unknown future communities to come, and strives to provide opportunities for current communities as well as any future ones to come. As the central building within a one block plan, the goal is to provide a community amenity that can be resilient to whatever the shifting needs of the community may be while simultaneously acting as a neutral backdrop to whatever form of cultural identity comes to the space.

SOCIAL NEEDS

SITE CONDITIONS

OPEN FOR SUNLIGH


supportive exchange

HT

COLLABORATIVE CONNECTIONS

AMENITIES FOR SOCIAL CHANGE


INCLINE TERRACED GARDENS

COMMERCIAL

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PU

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I BL

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W AY

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TRANSIT

2 3

DOWNTOWN INTERNATIONAL DISTRICT

COMMUNITY

4

YESLER TERRACE COMMUNITY

PLAY

5 6 7

BAILY GATZERT ELEMENTARY WASHINGTON HALL SEATTLE UNIVERISITY

COMMERCE

8 9

12TH AVENUE LITTLE SAIGON

2

IA

7

4

3

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6 1 9

PERFORMANCE CANOPY

BAKERY PLAZA

PUBLIC MARKET

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S IR PA E R E AG KE R BI STO +

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SITE

8

DE

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TRANSIT PLAZA

SL

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BIKE YARD

IT UN MM CO CHEN KIT

LI V SE E + RV W IC OR E K M AR K

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BAKERY

12

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+ P HORE KSHA OR S W OL TO

NT

L AL

TI

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C DU

E Y DR UN LA

5

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OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

WORK YARD

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KIDS YARD

VERTICAL PLAY

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KIDS ALLEY

13

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With adjacent communities centers, juvenile detention centers, community gardens, homeless communities, and public schools; the culmination of a community kitchen, fabrication shop, experimental education tower, and public storage are meant to foster public amenities to learn, train, build, engage, and exchange. While architecture is not the solution to all social injustices, the facility looks to empower people through architectural features and architectural neutrality. People bring the character that architecture seeks.

CULTIVATING THE COMMUNITY COMMONS: Climate, Culture and Craft

N

SITE PLAN

BAKE

RY

PUBLIC STORAGE

PROGRAM MASSING

EXPE R CULIN IMENTAL ARY LAB

FABRICATION LAB

KIDS TOWER

HOMELESS AMENITIES

GROUND PLAN

N


MATERIAL PALETTE: ENGINEERED WOOD

EXPERIMENTAL CULINARY LAB

WORKSHOP AND TOOL EXCHANGE


PERFORATED STEEL SCREEN FOR GLARE CONTROL OPERABLE WINDOWS STACK VENTILATION

CROSS VENTILATION

SYSTEMS OPERATION: OPEN MODE

SYSTEMS DIAGRAM: WATER, EARTH, ENERGY

SENSOR OPERATED SKYLIGHTS

ERV


VERTICAL COMPOST HEATING NATURAL WATER FILTRATION WATER REUSE FOR RESTROOMS GREEN ROOF

TUBULAR PHOTOVOLTAICS RADIANT FLOORING PASSIVE HEATING & COOLING SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

WALL SECTION: CULINARY LAB


This design study is a two part exploration into nocturnal transitions centering around the body and emulating such through responsive environments. The wearable art, featured on the women in the render as well as the next page,captures transition of emotional state from the structured shell we can display in professional life to the vulnerable core we expose in private through the deconstruction of a tailored jacket to shredded cloak, gradually revealing a responsive, bioluminescent core. As an architectural culmination of these notions, the second exploration embodies transition of programmatic need for the wandering nocturnal souls of a city through providing a transformative physical manifestation of Post-Secret where people can temporarily claim an enclosed niche to tangibly express their inner thoughts upon the very surfaces. The structure is comprised of 8 niches that diurnally flourish in the night through incremental physical manipulation by and bioluminescent response of guests then collapse to altered residual installation during the day.


nocturnal kinespheres


NOCTURNAL SUSPENSION Stillness Suspended in the transition Between the night that has passed And the morning yet to come She walks. At a time when even the villains have gone to bed She walks peacefully yet anxiously To the children who hold her heart To the man who tore it apart To the home that mocks it at every chance. is no longer hers. These lonely walks After a long night’s work Are the only momentary pauses she sees in her life. Between juggling international relations in the office And personal in their fragile shell of a home She hardly finds the time to just be. So she meanders Among illuminated remnants of a world she barely calls her own Lingering by the closed storefronts Hoping that with each pause Her inner peace may finally catch up. After all They’re the only two around In the anxious calm Of a Sun Yet To come.


waterfront pavilion + modular stage Seattle, WA | March 2014 - September 2016

Friends of Waterfront Seattle + UW Team Members | Calder Danz + Alden Mackey

kinesperic confessions

Seattle, WA | June - September 2016 Seattle Design Festival 2016 | Block Party

recording mexico city

Mexico City, Mexico | February 2015 Galleria San Potosi Professors | Robert Hutchison + Corey Mattheis


installations


Above: isometric depiction of installations when fully implemented. credit: Alden Mackey + Gabe Gonzales

Many changes are coming to the Seattle Waterfront. From sea levels rising, to infrastructural borders diminishing, Seattle’s waterfront is in the process of removing barriers and rediscover the true beauty of the edge. In efforts to help this energizing process, a local nonprofit, Friends of Waterfront Seattle, has been looking for temporary installations that energize the current waterfront amenities, yet be reused in future stages of the waterfront. Featured here are two installations of varying scales in Waterfront Park striving for those efforts; both student-lead and studentdesigned.

Shown here is the primary installation, a modular pavilion starting above the central stairs to the park, soaring over the concrete barrier between park and promenade, and ultimately terminating at the performance stage on the south end. With vaulted sails tensioned within each steel frame module, the structure is meant to be a beacon to the park, symbol for the region, and armature for framing views out to the water. The other installation is a modular stage to work in concert with the pavilion to provide social centers within the park.


First constructed module test assembled inside before galvanizing process. March 2016 credit: Calder Danz

waterfront pavilion

First constructed module assembled on site. June 2016 credit: Calder Danz


Featured here are both temporary installations. The left page features primarily the pavilion, and the right, the stage. Delivery methods have been crucial in design development and client communication; particularly since both must be stored away then reassembled every six months. Thus, both installations have had to work through module sizes, transportation limitations, and assembly methods. With the pavilion, the main focus was developing an elegant solution with minimal parts for visual continuity as well as ease of assembly. For the stage, the focus was on portable sections that could fit on a truck bed, yet were substantial enough on their own against performances and the environment. Both installations have their own character, yet work together to enrich the quality of social life on the waterfront.

POSTCARD GRAPHIC credit: Calder Danz + Alden Mackey

ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM credit: Calder Danz + Lisa Glenn


8'-75 8"

7" 8

OPTION OPTION 1: 1: CONFIGURATIONS INDIVIDUAL MODULE

OPTION 1: ASSEMBLED STAGE PLAN

18'-218"

7'-314"

3'-758"

25'-21 8"

6'-31 2"

18'-105 8"

480.2 SF modules of stage during various stages from pre-delivery to fully assembled and in use. 404 SF

OPTION 2 (x 14)

29'-078"

TION 2: OPTION 2: INDIVIDUAL ONFIGURATIONS

OPTION 2:

CONFIGURATIONS and delivery method modular stageOPTION configurations 2: OPTION 2:

INDIVIDUAL MODULE

ASSEMBLED STAGE PLAN

9'-113 4"

OPTION 1: TRANSPORTATION - 10' TRUCK BED

6'-31 2"

TION 1: ONFIGURATIONS INDIVIDUAL

STAGE | MODULE COMPARISON

24'-1183"

STAGE | MODULE COMPARISON

OPTION 1 (x 7)

OPTION 1 7 modules 294.5lbs/module

17'-33 8"

8'-75 8"

25'-11"

452.2 SF 344 SF

OPTION 2: TRANSPORTATION - 10' TRUCK BED

2'-11 2"

CARRIED BETWEEN: 4 ppl=73.5 lbs ea. 3 ppl=98.2 lbs ea.

OPTION 2 14 modules 151lbs/module

7'-341"

CARRIED BETWEEN: 4 ppl=37.75 lbs ea. 3 ppl=50.3 lbs 2 ppl=75.5 lbs

STAGE | MODULE COMPARISON

2'-11 2" 9'-113 4"

pavilion + modular stage

19'-1112"


conceptual development


kinespheric confessions


niche

panel

8’

10’

prepped

installed

10’

10’

customized

select fixed dowels for added structural stability

central panel and some end points secured to base for structural stability

moveable dowels secured by rope for interactive user control

fixed adjustable interactive design | safety assurance

N|S elevation

E|W elevation


Often times, we can feel like passive players in our world; temporary observers in an environment designed despite us. Appropriations of space or voice are looked at as something to be silenced, and responsive environments left highly controlled. But what if we challenged the norm and let users be fully in control? Building off of the Nocturnal Kinspheres project, this installation empowers people to take spatial formation into their own hands to create micro atmospheres where they can unleash their inner expression onto the city then pass along this environment to the next visitor, incrementally altering the original space to one that is fully of the people, and by the people; rather than designed with people as a backdrop.

site plan

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“Within a series of accordion-style niches, visitors are invited to climb inside and freely express themselves however they see fit, both artistically and spatially. Manipulate each enclosure with your own range of motion (kinesphere) to create the perfect temporary hideaway for your expression, and be witness, both as participant and observer, to the impact your actions have to the character of the space. With each person’s contribution, this installation will evolve by the actions we take and change we bring into a living embodiment of the empowered human spirit. Let’s free ourselves from walls we cannot draw on and spaces we cannot make our own. Come join in and see the beauty in design that reflects the lives it encompasses.”


This display is a study of perception to better understand the space in which life actively occurs in these dense neighborhoods, from communal activities to utilities. Looking across neighborhoods of varying style and development, this project explores the relationship between entry view and perceived void in order to understand the character behind these prominent vecindades.

recording mexico city

Vecindades are a neighborhood typology that has played a crucial role in densifying Mexico City for generations. Physically, one is typically defined as an open air corridor with housing units on either side, yet, symbolically, it represents home. Initially, these neighborhoods organically enveloped open space around the city. However, in recent years, vecindades have become a part of planned residential development within the city.


Various vecindades were explored around Mexico City, first through photography and site analysis, then through plaster sculptures of the voids within each vecindad. Each plaster model displays the unique characteristics of each vecindad as well as comparable forms of the open space present in each. The gallery piece, as seen to the right, brings together both the photography and modeled voids in order to create a bold comparison between the different neighborhoods throughout the city. Each plaster model is suspended infront of the entry view into each vecindad, with a thin outline drawn around each as a proportional connection between model and photo. entry images for each featured vecindad

By suspending a solid depiction of voidal space in front, visitors are able to observe spatial voids tactually in all dimensions. Having the entry view directly in line with each model gives context to the irregular forms and what the impressions on each surface are in actuality.


richmond priory library Richmond, North Yorkshire, UK

hand drafting | hand sketching | digital drafting | photoshop | colored pencil

blackbox theatre Baltimore, MD

hand drafting | photoshop | hand sketching | sketchup | charcoal

travel sketches Various Locations pencil | pen

interstitial light study charcoal | cardboard | vellum | tracing paper

screen printmaking


undergraduate


richmond priory library

Located ajacent to the city center, the Richmond Priory Tower stands as one of many historical ruins in the town of Richmond, England. As the last remnant of the original priory and its central location, it stands as a beacon across the town. With active commercial and historic areas, Richmond is in need of a place where the community can grow, both individually and

view upon arrival

colaboratively. Given the tower’s location between the local theatre and hospital, the site stands as an optimal communal spot. Additionally, Libraries are wonderful opportunities for education and leisure. They are pefect institutions for both individual growth and communal participation. Hence, designing a library on the site is appropriate to achieve the goal of creating a revitalizing communal space.


Looking towards precedents such as the works of Alvar Aalto, Louis I. Kahn, and Tadao Ando; the building is designed as a two-courtyard scheme where a central reading room is held in between wings of private study and communal conference space. The plan was designed through the use of classical proportions, yet structured and detailed through more contemporary work, as influenced by precedents. The reading room stands as a connection point between public and private program, both inside and out. The courtyard at the front of the building, as illustrated on the left page, is meant to

interior: reading room looking back at relic

welcome visitors as the venture under the priory tower, while the courtyard in the back of the building is more secluded for visitors looking for a place of respite within nature. The library engages with the tower through a second story reading area, to further provide places of solitude for readers within the ruin. The material choice of heavy timber is meant to provide the feeling of stability libraries often inherit, while the choice of glazing is to fully engage visitors with the survivng ruin and lushish vegetation surrounding the site.


PROGRAMMATIC TECTONICS solar panels rainwater collection system horizontal louvers

recycled green wine bottle glass low-e glass locally salvaged lumber adaptive structural insertion

The library is constructed from two main systems. Proportions indicate location of cross circulation through exchange of root two ratios. From there, vertical forms indicate program.

Concrete columns run along the wings of supporting program with visual termination at perpendicular walls, to grant only a direct visual connection of the tower from the reading room.


Locally salvaged lumber is used for columns of the reading room; and recycled glass from England’s surplus of green wine bottles is used tectonically to emphasize the cross circulation.


connection

cultural

main section from entry to theatre

Located along the knuckle of Eastern Avenue, Highlandtown and Greektown are two culturally-rich areas within the city of Baltimore. With the arts district of Highlandtown and the cultural richness of Greektown, the two areas offer wonderful opportunities to reignite the vivacity Baltimore can have. Despite the two neighborhoods being adjacent to each other, they are restricted from fully symbiotically benefitting each other due to an abandoned industrial strip which runs through Eastern Ave. In order to connect the two areas and revitalize the community culturally, I designed a black box theatre along the abandoned industrial strip. The form of the building was influenced by the concept of two similar, yet

disconnected forms, colliding through a central space. This imagery is meant to symbolize the neighborhoods and the potential the site has to unite them. Thus, the central space of the building, aside from the actual theatre, is the central atrium. In fact, it is a pivotal point within the procession of the building, where visitors become a part of the architectural experience by ascending along the curve of the atrium wall, and transitioning from active participant to observer of the communal space. At the center of the space is an interactive, translucent form which illuminates itself in various ways throughout the day, meant to further celebrate the vivacity of the space and provide communal activity through interacting with the form.


Within the plan of the building, the rectilinear forms, hosting spaces such as galleries, office space, and a restaurant, keep a strict orthogonal nature. This is solely disrupted through the lyrical dialogue between the theatre and the atrium. This, in accordance with the skewed orientation of the rectangular forms, is done to emphasize the liveliness and uniqueness of the community.

1 COLLIDE

2 EMBRACE

3 RESPOND

4 REVEAL


west elevation

exterior: entry at night


travel sketches


travel sketches


interstitial light study

Light and shadow are among the strongest tools in shaping an experience of space. I am intrigued by how the interaction of the two can be utilized to process throughout a space. The stark contrast of the two is used to guide visitors through sequential spaces whether in acts of avoidance or embrace.

This study explores this idea. Light is used, at times, as a tool to direct past darkness in avoidance, while at others, to circumambulate around a place of illumination in embrace.


s c r e e n

p r i n t m a k i n g

Screen printmaking is a fully engaging process, from developing the composition of each layer of ink, to the life of the ink itself. The three compositions presented are all of one project. The purpose of the project was to create a single, replicable composition (left), then abstract the composition into two unique prints using only the components of the original composition (bottom).


lisa glenn gra d uate c an d id ate | m.a rch un i ver s i t y o f was h i n gto n lgle n n 28@ u w. e d u

Lisa Glenn | Design  

Collection of design work across academic and professional endeavors.