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Collection of Work

2016 - 2018

Master of Architecture University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning


CONTENTS Places 4 16 28 40

Massing Mass Hotel No. 2 One Plex Two Plex Birdwatching Hotel

Experiments 52 54 58

Flat to Fold Disciplined Object Office space


Studio: Institutions Instructor: Laida Aguirre

This project sees the fire station as an assembly of parts, a shifting storage space, a network of temporal uses. The apparatus bay is the clearest product of this. It houses a set of given things, yet it is never “used” within the fire station. Fire stations are often indistinguishable from the surrounding architecture, apart from larger garage doors. It chooses to disguise itself, hiding behind brownstones, bricks, and suburbuia. The project explores how storage/fire station can be visualized and produce a heightened awareness of the data and activity within. The proposal for this fire station uses the weight of the elements housed within as the manifestation of fire station as storage. Each program is tied to the cumulative weight of its things to determine its sectional quality (‘the weighted program’) and elevational quality. Each program takes a visual form, communicating its weight through its roof line. The project is a collection of individual volumes, a repetitive system of form, influenced by the weight of its contents and its weight in its context. The building has an open continuous floor plan for maximum adjacency to the apparatus. The programs are only delineated through the articulation of the underbelly of the roofline. There is no explicit form of circulation, connecting program to program within a single floor. The apparatus bay stitches the private and public parts of the building, creating a gradient condition of the essential core to the more leisurely spaces.


Lorraine Gemino

Places

Data Diagram The studio’s premise was to formalize information. This data diagram was produced to show the weight of all the contents within a firestation. The top diagram shows the weight of each necessary item through the density of lines. The bottom diagram synthesizes the items and divides the contents by each program.

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Places

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Portfolio


Massing Mass

Places

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Places

Portfolio

Form Generation From the previous diagram, the roof is extruded to correlate to the weight of its contents per program. The heaviest program is the apparatus bay which houses multiple firetrucks that weigh tons.

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Massing Mass

Places

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Places

Portfolio

Transoblique Floor Plan

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Massing Mass

Places

Transoblique Reflected Ceiling Plan

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Places

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Portfolio


Massing Mass

Places

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Places

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Portfolio


Massing Mass

Places

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Places

Portfolio

Studio: Situation Instructor: Thom Moran

The approach to the project is to distill and weave the urban context of the strip district of Pittsburgh into the site. The project started from a series of exterior paths intersecting and culminating in a central courtyard. These paths become an extension of the strip district, pulling views/circulation lines from the neighborhood into the building. These exterior paths, accessed from each adjacent street, lead users into a hub for rock climbing. From this negative space, the hotel takes form creating a boundary between the site and the courtyard. The hotel is then a collection of shared public spaces. Organizationally, the hotel rooms are placed centrally, with circulation on the exterior. This creates tension between the exterior rock climbing activity and the hotel rooms which resulted in a facade that can be a depression for a rock climbing hold or an opening for daylighting. The hotel becomes a synthesis of public space.

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Places

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Places

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Portfolio


Hotel No. 2

Places

Space making through images The studio’s primary concern was the development of architecture through programmatic activity or situations.. We were given an architectural precedent, Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Field Chapel, to develop into a series of indoor and outdoor hotel spaces. Through the chapel, we took cues from the materiality, narrow enclosures, and focused direction of light. By focusing on these few ideas, the project turned into a concept of linear striations scattered throughout the building, hosting different programs. The model uses CNC routed foam, bass wood cladded in textured material, and bass wood cut people. Model and photography in collaboration with Rebecca Lesher

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Hotel No. 2

Places

Concept Development From the previous design exercises, the linear striations were explored to divide the site into four quadrants. These striations then culminated in a central courtyard, creating a central hub of activity. Iterations were created using Python scripting for Rhino.

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Places

Portfolio

Second Floor

Ground Floor

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Hotel No. 2

Places

Typical Hotel Floor

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Places

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Portfolio


Hotel No. 2

Places

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Places

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Portfolio


Hotel No. 2

Places

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Studio: Form Instructor: Anya Sirota

This project challenges the hierarchical notions of a duplex by blurring the demarcation of units in both formal and organizational means. From the urban context, the form creates perspectival distortions. The building transforms from one figure to two figures from different privileged views. The perception changes continuously in multiple angles, obscuring the duplex typology. The interior spaces are carved out of the volumes to create a social layer of gathering, dining, and lounging. These spaces are shared between both units further blurring the duplex typlogy. This project was featured in the Student Show and won the Merit Award.


Lorraine Gemino

Places

Concept Development An earlier exercise of collaging elevations of modernist buildings produced novel readings of form. Through this iterative exercise, a concept of perspectival distortion was developed.

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Places

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Portfolio


One Plex. Two Plex.

Places

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Places

Portfolio

Form Generation The form was derived from iterations of two simple adjacent gable roof buildings. This elevation was then projected at an angle on two separate volumes. The interior volumes were produced as a mediation with the exterior roof.

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One Plex. Two Plex.

Places

Transforming Elevation

Interior Volumes

Duplex Distribution

Circulation

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Places

Portfolio

Roof Plan

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor

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One Plex. Two Plex.

Places

Physical Model Form becomes distorted from the top elevation to bottom elevation revealing perspectival distortions

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Places

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Portfolio


One Plex. Two Plex.

Places

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Places

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Portfolio


One Plex. Two Plex.

Places

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Instructor: Rene Davids

Alameda Point, at the center of an urban landscape, provides a unique environment for a hotel. Originally a wetland, it was developed as a naval air station, but has recently been abandoned, creating a hybrid of deteriorating concrete and wetland marshes, which allows a varied ecosystem. This project takes advantage of the existing landscape, highlighting the hotel as more than a temporal dwelling, but a destination and platform for the surrounding environment. The hotel seeks to transpose the history of human alteration and development in Alameda Point. Human habitation becomes secondary with the hotel room sunken below ground. Wildlife takes precedence preserving the ground level as an accessible public park. The building straddles multiple conditions. The undulating plaza is a dialogue between inside and outside, simultaneously shelter and surface. As the user moves through the hotel, they are submerged in the ocean or embedded in the ground, providing a multi-experiential habitat.


Lorraine Gemino

Places

Bird Frequency and Density higher density smaller density

least tern shoveler black-necked stilt red-tailed hawk

summer

coot

winter

golden-crowned sparrow

year round

osprey

Potential Flooding 1 ft of flooding 3 ft of flooding 5 ft of flooding

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Places

Portfolio

Tidal Levels & Bird Migration By Month

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Birdwatching Hotel

Places

Site grid generated through existing naval

Building grid generated through coastline

Programmatic overlay

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Places

Portfolio

01 Program Division

The organization of space is separated into three pathways. First, the primary programs, accessible to the public, is placed in the center. Second, the hotel is embedded underground, creating additional privacy. Additional areas are reserved for circulation.

02 Entry And Exit

The entrance is informal, blending in with the natural ground and vegetation. The path sinks to create a secondary entrance for hotels and back of house programs. The building splits into two conditions at the exit, creating varied views of the bay.

02.5 Enclosure Iteration

The path lifts up to create an enclosure for the library, cafe, and pool.

03 Bird Watching Hotel

Rather than a singular view away from the ocean, program is approached in multiple directions. This creates a 360 view of the site, maximizing views of birds. The circulation then encourages the user to wander, exploring different conditions.

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Birdwatching Hotel

Places

Roof Plan

Ground Floor

Basement Floor

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Places

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Portfolio


Birdwatching Hotel

Places

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Places

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Portfolio


Birdwatching Hotel

Places

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Places

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Portfolio


Birdwatching Hotel

Places

High Tide

Low Tide

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Course: Fabrication Instructor: Glenn Wilcox Collaborators: George Keppler, Yufeng Wang, Xuran Yuan

Rather than modifying a rectangular metal sheet or creating a panelized wall, this project creates a wall system through interdependent components. A part to whole relationship. Each part is a triangulated mobius strip, bending in opposite direction from its adjacent parts. Through a grid system, the aperture subtly changes from part to part. The band running through each part for attachment also affects the shape of the aperture. In its orthographic or ‘straight on’ view, the wall is a series of overlapping diamonds, but as it is seen from different directions, the wall becomes three dimensional. The aperture void spaces start reading as three dimensional solids.


Lorraine Gemino

Experiments

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Course: Representation Instructor: Michael Jefferson

Throughout the course, we were given an object to discipline, domesticate and redefine. My initial object was a rock that I 3D scanned and outputted into a mesh. Through a set of excercises, the rock was projected in different ways to create new readings and familiarizations of the project. The object was reproduced multiple times using compound curves and tangential lines. The final drawing-model used section profiles of the rock that then unraveled and extended infinitely to create multiple readings of the rock. Some of these techniques used extrusions, revolutions, and shears. The final project is a hybrid of a three-dimensional model of contours combined with a mylar printed drawing.


Lorraine Gemino

Experiments

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Expriments

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Portfolio


Disciplined Object

Experiments

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Course: Generative Design Computing Instructor: Erik Herrmann Collaborators: Ibiayi Briggs, Matthew Shulman, Benjamin vanSchaayk

Office Space reimagines the Burolandschaft for today’s technology companies. Python scripts reconfigure sets of furniture into patterns that describe the open floor plan of a new crop of startups. Through pattern generation, we explore existing corporate spatial hierarchies and possibly inventing new ones. In contrast to the metric-driven approach to office planning used by today’s tech companies (i.e. Facebook demands a specific carpet to desk ratio in its office plan), we aim to invert the idea of an algorithmic space design in a way that foregrounds overall spatial relationships and their resulting experiences.


Lorraine Gemino

Experiments

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Expriments

Portfolio

Ad Hoc Plan

Cluster Plan

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Office Space

Experiments

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Collection of Work  

Master of Architecture Candidate 2019 @University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning

Collection of Work  

Master of Architecture Candidate 2019 @University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning

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