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public about issues affecting Hispanic LGBT older adults (Azteca Project, b). SAGE Harlem offers a variety services to connect LGBT older adults, many of them Hispanic, to available resources, legal assistance, and opportunities for social interaction (SAGE). Despite the need for organizations like SAGE and the Azteca Project across the country, there are few organizations that are dedicated to serving Hispanic LGBT older adults. There are some exceptions, with most such organizations working in parts of the country with large populations of Hispanics, like Southern California. Gay and Lesbian Elder Housing (GLEH) in Hollywood, California, specializes in serving lower-income LGBT older adults in need of housing (Gay and Lesbian Elder Housing). Organizations like GLEH have developed the capacity and expertise to work with Hispanic LGBT older adults through years of experience. As the Hispanic LGBT population grows and ages, similar organizations will gain such experience.

Hispanic Older Adults The rapid growth of the Hispanic population in the United States, including that of Hispanic older adults, is well documented (US Census Bureau, 2008). Hispanic older adults are a diverse population (Ennis, Rios-Vargas, & Albert, 2011) who face significant challenges in old age, primarily having to do with attaining financial security, maintaining health (Administration on Aging, 2010), and accessing needed services (Hispanics in Philanthropy, 2011). Economic Status Hispanic older adults face many challenges in attaining economic security in old age. Low levels of formal education (Administration on Aging, 2010), language barriers, and limited economic opportunities throughout life (US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2010) all make affording secure retirement difficult for many Hispanic older adults. In general, higher levels of education lead to higher rates of employment and higher income (US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011). Although the Hispanic community is making great strides in educational achievement (Fry, 2009), Hispanic older adults have significantly lower levels of educational attainment than the general older adult population (Administration on Aging, 2010). Similarly, the Pew Hispanic Center notes that first-generation immigrants to the U.S. are less likely to speak English as well as subsequent generations (Hakimzadeh, Cohn, 2007). Because many Hispanic older adults are first-generation immigrants, many were disadvantaged in the job market by limited English proficiency (Hakimzadeh et al, 2007). The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that Hispanics are overrepresented in generally low-wage positions and that, when they do have work in occupations that tend to pay more, they earn less than their counterparts in other ethnic groups 12

In Their Own Words: Hispanic LGBT Older Adults  

This report was created by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) in partnership with SAGE and sponsored by the Diverse Elder Coalit...

In Their Own Words: Hispanic LGBT Older Adults  

This report was created by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) in partnership with SAGE and sponsored by the Diverse Elder Coalit...

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