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Pre- and Post-SHE Check-ins

Pre- and Post-SHE Check-ins Check-ins should be held at the beginning and the end of the 12-session program. These check-ins provide participants with personalized baseline information for a number of health metrics that they can use to measure their improvement after completion of the program. Measurements taken at the health fair should include: ► Waist Circumference ► Weight ► Height ► Blood Pressure ► Balance/Fall Risk (Timed Up and Go Test) ► Cardiovascular Step Test Many of these measurements focus on broader health (e.g., balance), which is important to emphasize as research has shown that older lesbian and bisexual women may not be receptive to messaging focused on weight or body mass index (BMI). The measures included in this program will show participants how physical activity and improved eating can affect their entire body and health—not just their waistline. It is important that, to the extent possible, the same individual measure waist circumference at program baseline and program completion (for a given participant) to avoid reliability problems. Measurements should be taken by individuals trained to perform such measurements (e.g., nurse, fitness professional).

Waist Circumference Are you an apple or a pear? Women with a waist circumference of 32-35 inches or greater are at an increased risk for developing chronic diseases, including diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. In a study of 44,000 women (the Nurses’ Health Study), women with waist sizes greater than 35 inches had double the risk of dying from heart disease than those women with waist sizes 28 inches or fewer! And the risks increased steadily with each additional inch. This increased risk was true regardless of weight. Waist circumference may be a better indicator for health risk than weight is, and when combined with weight and height, can be even more predictive of health risks. Even modest waist reductions (5%) can reduce an individual’s blood pressure and total cholesterol.

Belly, or visceral, fat surrounding the liver and other abdominal organs is very metabolically active. It releases fatty acids, inflammatory agents, and hormones that ultimately lead to higher LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose, and blood pressure.

Check In/Out; Page 11

Profile for SAGE

SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized.) Facilitator's Guide  

The SHE Facilitator Guide provides information on the Strong, Healthy, Energized (SHE), a facilitator-led, group-based health and fitness pr...

SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized.) Facilitator's Guide  

The SHE Facilitator Guide provides information on the Strong, Healthy, Energized (SHE), a facilitator-led, group-based health and fitness pr...

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