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healthcare, revocable/irrevocable trust, and a power of attorney for finance; African Americans are the least likely to have any of these. African American participants report higher rates of discrimination based on gender identity, sexual orientation, race, and gender, while non-Hispanic white participants report the lowest. Non-Hispanic whites report the lowest levels of abuse among racial and ethnic groups. Income LGBT participants whose incomes are at or below 200% of the FPL have less social support than those with higher incomes. They are also less likely to seek social support from a partner or spouse, close friend, or family member, but are more likely to turn to social services. Compared to those with higher incomes, lower income participants are less likely to have a will, power of attorney for healthcare, a power of attorney for finance, a revocable or irrevocable trust, or long-term care insurance, and less likely to have made a charitable legacy gift. Lower income LGBT participants are also more likely to experience discrimination based on gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, race, and socioeconomic status. They are also more likely to experience abuse and victimization. Education LGBT participants who have some college education or less have less social support than those with a 4-year college degree or more. They are also more likely to have no one to whom they can turn for support. When seeking social and emotional support, they are less likely than those with a 4-year degree or more to turn to a partner or spouse, a close friend, a family member, or a therapist, but are more likely to turn to social services. Compared to LGBT adults with a 4-year degree or more, those with less than a 4-year degree are less likely to have a will, power of attorney for healthcare, a power of attorney for finance, a revocable or irrevocable trust, to have made a charitable legacy gift, or long-term care insurance. They also experience more race-based discrimination and abuse. Relationship status LGBT adults in relationships enjoy the highest levels of social support, regardless of whether those relationships are legally recognized, while those who are not in a relationship have less social support. Those not in relationships are more likely to have no one to whom they can turn for support, compared to those who are. Obviously, those in relationships are more likely than those who are not to turn to a partner or spouse for emotional and social support. LGBT participants in legally recognized relationships are the least likely to turn to social services, compared to those in relationships that are not legally recognized, or those not in relationships. LGBT adults in legally recognized relationships are more likely to be out about their sexual orientation or gender identity. They are also more likely to have executed a will, power of attorney for healthcare, a power of attorney for finance, a revocable or irrevocable trust, and long-term care insurance. Those in legally recognized relationships report the least past-year victimization, compared to those in relationships that are not legally recognized, or those not in relationships.

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Profile for SAGE

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

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