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Among the LGBT participants who were abused in the past 12 months, nearly half (43%) were abuse by a friend, 27% by a partner or spouse, and 20% each by a family member or paid caregiver.

Perpetrators of abuse of LGBT older adult participants Friend 43% Partner or spouse 27% Family member 20% Paid caregiver 20%

Why abuse and victimization are not reported Only about one in four (28%) of LGBT participants who have been abused or victimized actually reported the crime to the authorities. The reasons given by those who did not report such experiences include:  Too ashamed (21%)  Didn't know how (18%)  Didn't trust authorities to treat LGBT people fairly (9%)  Afraid doing so would require disclosure of sexual orientation or gender identity (2%)  Fearful because of immigration status (2%)  Other reason (48%) (not specified)

Analysis of resources and risks by key background characteristics In the following section we report on analyses of resources and risks findings by background characteristics (gender, age, race/ethnicity, income, education, relationship status, living arrangement, and HIV/AIDS). Only statistically significant findings are summarized below. Gender Men in this study are more likely than women to have no one to whom they can turn for support. Women are also more likely than men to turn to a partner or spouse, a family member, a neighbor, and their faith community for social and emotional support. Women are more likely than men to have a power of attorney for health care. Women are more likely than men to experience gender and age discrimination, and to have been victimized in the past 12 months. Age LGBT participants aged 60 to 69 are more “out” about their sexual orientation and gender identity than their older peers. They are less likely to have executed a will, have a power of attorney for health care, a revocable or irrevocable trust, or have funeral plans in place. They also report more discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity than their older counterparts, as well as discrimination based on race and economic status. Participants aged 60 to 69 also report higher rates of past-year victimization than their older counterparts. LGBT participants aged 80 and older in this study are less likely than their younger peers to turn to a therapist for social and emotional support. Race and ethnicity LGBT Hispanic participants are the least likely to turn to a partner or spouse for social support, while non-Hispanic white participants are the most likely to do so. Non-Hispanic whites attend religious or spiritual activities or services at the lowest rate, while Asian Americans attend at the highest rate. LGBT Hispanic and African American participants are less “out” than non-Hispanic white participants. Non-Hispanic whites are the most likely to have a will, power of attorney for 32

Profile for SAGE

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

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