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Resources and Risks Resources and risks can influence one’s well-being. Resources can take many forms such as social support, spirituality, and planning for future needs, and we can draw on our resources in times of need. Risks, such as discrimination and abuse, can have a negative impact on physical and mental health. In this section we look at both resources and risks of LGBT older adults. The sexual orientation and gender identity comparisons summarized below are based on statistical significance tests4 adjusting for age, income, and education. For sexual orientation comparisons lesbians are compared to gay men; bisexual women and men are compared to lesbians and gay men. For gender identity comparisons transgender women and men are compared with non-transgender women and men. A breakdown of resource and risk findings by sexual orientation, gender identity, and background characteristics can be found in Appendix Tables 4 and 5. When comparing San Francisco’s LGBT older adult participants to older adults in San Francisco’s general population, some preliminary findings emerge that deserve additional attention:  Of the older adult population in San Francisco, 16% report that no one is available to understand their problems; 29% have no one to help with daily chores when sick (CHIS, 2003); 9% of LGBT participants have no one to turn to for support, encouragement, or short term help.  Estimates of past-year elder abuse/neglect range from 8% to 10% with only about 7% of cases being reported (National Center on Elder Abuse & Administration on Aging, n.d.). About 5% of LGBT participants have experienced past-year abuse/neglect, 21% have been victimized; 28% of those who experienced abuse or victimization reported it to authorities. Resources As human beings, we are by definition social creatures. The very heart of this concept is found in the Nguni word ubuntu. Roughly translated, ubuntu means, ‘we are only fully and truly human through our relationships with others.’ Social support is ubuntu in action. It is also critical to our health and well-being, especially among older adults (Barker, Herdt, & de Vries, 2006; Netuveli, Wiggins, Hildon, Montgomery, & Blane, 2006; Strine, Chapman, Balluz, Moriarty, & Mokdad, 2008). 4

See Methodology for overview of tests of significance for these analyses. 26

Profile for SAGE

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

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