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Living arrangement LGBT participants who live alone are more likely to rent. They are less likely to own their home, to have their mortgage paid off, or to be paying a mortgage, and to have an alternative housing arrangement, such as living rent free with a friend or relative, in a nursing home, or other health care facility. LGBT adults who live alone are less likely to live in a house or apartment, and are more likely to live in senior housing, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, or an age-restricted community. They are also more likely to be domiciled in a SRO or to be homeless, and less likely to be confident that they will be able to stay in their current housing for as long as they wish. Those who live alone are more likely than those living with others to cite the need to move out of San Francisco as the reason they might need to move out of their current housing situation. HIV/AIDS There do not appear to be any differences in household size or housing arrangement between HIV-positive gay, bisexual, and transgender men and their HIV-negative counterparts. However, those who are HIV-positive are more likely to live in a house or apartment than those who are HIV-negative. Summary Lesbian participants have larger households and are more likely to own their homes than gay men. Very few bisexual and transgender women and men own their homes, and are much more likely to be renting. Most LGBT older adult participants live in an apartment or house, but some are living in SROs or are homeless. About a third of the LGBT participants are very confident that they will be able to stay in their current housing for as long as they wish. The most commonly cited reasons for the possible need to relocate are economic reasons, health reasons, and changing needs related to aging; men are more likely than women to cite rising crime rates as the reason for their current housing instability; transgender participants are more likely to cite economic reasons, and along with bisexuals, they are also more likely to acknowledge instability in their current housing situation.

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Profile for SAGE

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

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