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case manager/social worker, mental health services, and housing assistance. In addition, they show the lowest use for telephone/online referrals. Living arrangement LGBT adults who live alone predictably have greater service needs and accordingly greater service use than those who live with others. Those living alone use and have significantly more need for in-home care, home-delivered meals, meal site/free groceries, day programs, a case manager/social worker, and mental health services. HIV/AIDS Due to challenges of living with HIV, we might expect that those who are HIV-positive would have significantly greater need and use for almost all programs and services to support them in the community. We found this to be the case in only a few of the services and programs listed. Compared to their HIV-negative peers, LGBT participants living with HIV/AIDS have a greater need for a case manager/social worker, mental health services, and housing assistance, and greater use for a meal site/free groceries and mental health services. Summary About half of respondents report needing health services; other commonly needed services include health promotion, mental health services, housing assistance, case manager/social worker, telephone/online referrals, and meal site/free groceries. Other common needs observed from each sexual orientation and gender identity group include in-home care (lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender adults), door-to-door transportation (lesbians), day programs (gay men), and caregiver support (transgender adults). Overall, bisexual and transgender participants report elevated need for most services. Common unmet need areas include health promotion, door-to-door transportation, caregiver support, day programs, housing assistance, in-home care, and telephone/online referrals. Many LGBT participants report that inhome care, door-to-door transportation, and health services are too expensive to use and other services are difficult to access. In addition, nearly a fifth did not use meal site/free groceries and telephone/online referrals because they feel those services are not LGBT friendly. In addition, half of those who used alcohol/substance abuse programs and housing assistance report that they did not feel comfortable using the services as an LGBT older adult. Racial/ethnic minority participants report higher rates of service need: mental health services for Hispanics and African Americans, housing assistance and day programs for Hispanics and Asian Americans. In addition, LGBT participants having low incomes, low education levels, and living alone are more likely to need services; those in relationships that are not legally recognized and those who are not married or partnered also report heightened service need.

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Profile for SAGE

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Older Adults in San Francisco: Recommendations for the Future  

This report examines results of a survey of more than 600 LGBT older adults in San Francisco in 2013.

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