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LEONARDO FRED MICOLTA DIAZ - SELECTED WORKS


CONTENTS

ACADEMIC PROJECTS LOUCA ACOMULAÇÃO MUSEUM

01

WILDERNESS RETREAT HOME

02

Santa Ana Art District, California Winter 2007 Mount Baldy, California Fall 2007

DESIGN COMPETITIONS OCCUPY NYSE

03

URBAN DUALITY

04

New York, New York Metropolis Mag. Living Cities Competition 2013 Evansville, Indiana A!A Indianapolis Infinity Competition 2013

BUILT PROJECTS FORTE NANSHAN

05

THAIHOT FUZHOU

06

VANKE A14 APPARTMENTS

07

CURRICULUM VITAE

08

Chongquing, China Completed 11.2011 Fuzhou, China Completed 08.2013 Foshan, China Phase 1 Completed 12. 2013

LEONARDO FRED MICOLTA DIAZ

lfmicolta@hotmail.com |+86 151 1268 0426


ACADEMIC PROJECTS


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LOUCA ACOMULAÇÃO MUSEUM

Santa Ana Art District, California Academic Project: Winter 2007 Advisor: Prof. Axel Prichard-Schmitzberger

The Louca –Acumulação Museum (L_AM) is a small museum that promotes the paradigm of a museum that is both a place to visit and a publicly accessible collection of works of art. The studio examined the notion of seductive artifacts against that of architecture as a seductive event.


EXPRESSIVE FORMS DERIVED FROM CONTEXTUAL ANALYSIS

SITE PLAN 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

CSU FULLERTON ART CENTER CAFE ART GALLERY RESTAURANT PUBLIC PARKING

L_AM will host a permanent small collection composed of PreColumbian Andean textiles, Santa Fe Mimbres pottery, and Mughal Miniature paintings. L_AM’s main programmatic goal is to make this small museum a center of activities amongst a diverse Santa Ana Art District. The design centers around condensing the exhibition space needed. Artifacts are placed in exhibition spaces that wrap the objects around the users. The architectural language aims to facilitate the creation of exhibits that impose relationships among these distinct objects. The exhibits become unique events as the curators aim to establish temporary themes in the arrangement of the exhibits. The conflicting or graceful relationships presented could be embraced or rejected by the users, provoking further dialogue between the curators and the visitors. The exhibits are isolated from one another and are connected through a single corridor that allows for a linear flow through the museum. The exhibits are located through the second and third levels. The fourth level is dedicated to administrative offices and the underground level will host all the curator’s laboratories, storage and research rooms. The condensation of the exhibition galleries consequently free up the ground level for a greater urban dialogue, while the architectural language is used consistently through the project to define structure and other program elements. The result is a museum that clearly resonates formally but at the same time is derived from programmatic and contextual needs. Ambiguous small collection

WHITE BOX MUSEUM Structure

Condense

Condense Structure

Continuous Ramp

ART-WRAP MUSEUM


SERVICE LIFT

FIRE ESCAPE ADMINISTRATION FIRE ESCAPE

GALLERY B

GALLERY A

PUBLIC ART MARKET PUBLIC GALLERY

PRESERVATION LAB

Louca Museum: Exploded Axonometric

MUSEUM ENTRY HALL

ARCHIVE


Santa Ana Art District Promenade


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MUSIC PERFORMANCE HALL MUSEUM ENRTY PUBLIC WC PUBLIC ART MARKET BACK OF HOUSE LOADING MUSEUM TICKET BOOTH FIRE ESCAPE PUBLIC FILM SCREENING MUSEUM ELEVATOR SERVICE ELEVATOR

MUSEUM RAMP START 1. 2. 3. 4.

INFORMATION DESK MUSEUM ELEVATOR FIRE ESCAPE GALLERY A


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MUSEUM RAMP END 1. 2. 3. 4.

GALLERY B GALLERY A BEYOND MUSEUM ELEVATOR FIRE ESCAPE

ADMINISTRATION LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

MANAGEMENT STAFF MEETING ROOM ADMINISTRATION RECEPTION FIRE ESCAPE SERVICE ELEVATOR GALLERY B BEYOND

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Gallery A

Art Market


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SECTION A 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

PRESERVATION LAB ARCHIVE SIDE ALLEY MUSIC HALL ART MARKET [COURT YARD] MUSEUM ENTRY HALL GALLERY A CORRIDOR GALLERY B ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

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02

WILDERNESS RETREAT HOME Mount Baldy, California Academic Project: Fall 2007 Advisor: Prof. Michael Fox

The studio asked for the design of a summer retreat home for a Japanese film director. Located in a remote area of Mount Baldy, the site can only be accessed by foot from a nearby visitor parking lot. The site is located amongst thick vegetation in a south facing hillside and has great views to

the valley. The studio’s goal was to minimize the site impact as well as exploring means to blur the boundaries between nature and architecture.


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RETURN TO THE PRIMITIVE HUT Viollet-le-Duc argued that “architecture began when rational planning and procedure was applied to the problem of the need for shelter.” Thus, he envisioned the primitive hut as a simple composition of weaved grass, mud and bent trees that poorly protected individuals from the elements. Ultimately through trial, error and the evolution of functional requirements, man came to dominate nature through architecture. The prominent man’s shelter evolved past being a mere protective hut into new symbolic composition of space and function. After millennia of being well sheltered and secluded from the natural world, we begin to question the direction of our path. Hidden within our man made environments, a new desire to return to the primitive hut is born. Thus the contemporary primitive hut places the individual back in the natural world, but this time with a positive attitude towards the experience. We have gone full circle and returned to our roots, to escape, retreat and connect with a primitive inner self that has long been forgotten.

FORM COMPOSITION The flow of the program ensures an adequate exposure to the elements. The first level enclosure is the “heart” of the project where cooking and living takes place. The second level enclosure host the sedentary activities, sleeping and reading. Between the enclosures we find the observation decks, each facing opposite directions for day gazing and night gazing. Site impact is minimized by concentrating the foundation to two points and unobstructive to the natural rain water drainage that flows through the center of the site.


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SPLIT LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

LIVING & DINING FIRE WOOD STOVE SHADED SEATING JAPANESE FUTON WC STORAGE

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DESIGN COMPETITIONS


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OCCUPY NYSE

New York, New York Metropolis Mag, Living Cities Competition 2013 Individual Design Entry

Sustainable design requires us to optimize the use of our nonrenewable resources while improving the environment for future generations. As population grows, and space becomes scarce, new developments must find opportunities within the underutilized existing build environment.

Under-utilized airspace is the next frontier for future city development. Its capitalization will transformed our cities into rich 3-dimensional urban spaces, and provide us the flexibility we require to adapt our cities for future needs.


? SITE SELECTION CRITERIA

UNDER-UTILIZED PRIME URBAN SPACE

INACCESSIBLE U.S. NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK

STOLEN PUBLIC SPACE

DESOLATE AFTER HOURS LANDSCAPE

CROWDED TRADING FLOOR


RESIDENTIAL ROOF TERRACE

RESIDENTIAL TOWER 10 FT Floor to Floor 9 FT Clear Height 31 Floors 62 Two Bedroom Units 62 Studio Units 31 One Bedroom Units 151 Total Residential Units

URBAN VOID

MIX-USE ROOF TERRACE LIVE-WORK LOFTS

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18 FT Floor to Floor 9 FT Split Level 9 Floors 18 Type A Units 18 Type B Units 36 Total Loft Units

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NYSE ROOF GARDEN NYSE

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NYSE VISITOR HALL WATER FEATURE SOLAR EXPOSURE

NYSE ENTRY


Expanded NYSE Trading Floor NYSE is a prime urban-void at the hearth of Lower Manhattan. The under-utilized urban space above the NYSE building is an ideal location for quality live-work units and apartments. As an urban intervention on a historic landmark, the new structure must take into careful consideration

the architectural and functional impact. A steel structural system was selected to minimize the amount of columns that protrude through the existing lower building. A clear glass double-faรงade system with thin frame mullions was selected to contrast the robust nature of the classical faรงade. Thus

a seemingly light and transparent steel structure fills the void above the NYSE building. Only after the new structure is occupied and filled with life, one can notice the use of the colorful rustic-orange metal screens, which provide a final and dynamic element to the composition.


THE OCCUPY URBAN ORDINACE: FLEXIBILITY FOR FUTURE NEEDS Traditionally, we have built our modern cities with the notion that land can be divided into parcels. Each parcel is given a function and built upon with-in the parameters of those assigned functions. Density, height limits and view corridors then restrict how the land parcel is architecturally expressed. Thus as a result, our cities are literally constrained extrusions of our ideal land parcel divisions. However, as population grows and land becomes scarce, we face the obvious systematic failure; not enough land for everyone. New York is the quintessential representation of our ideal land-use-extrusion city. New York has been viewed as the standard for city design for most of the 20st century. However, if New York is to provide for the needs of the future urban influx, first it must re-envision its understanding of land-use ordinances and its relationship to a three dimensional field. New York must evolve into a new 21st century city model.

VISITOR HALL

If we view nature as an example, we can observe that small mutations can have profound impacts on the longevity of a species. Their success however, is not solely attributed to the will of the species; it is dependent on multi-faceted external factors. Nevertheless, it is mutation that empowers species to adequately respond to environmental factors, and without it there is little hope for success. Similarly, our cities are like organisms in that our laws are our DNA. Our laws define the parameters from which we can adequately respond to external factors. And similarly to organisms, if we don’t mutate our laws to deal with new external factors, the longevity of our cities is at risk. Hence is the idea of the Occupy Urban Ordinance, a mutation of the current land-use ordinance that would empower citizens to adequately transform our built environment. The ordinance would enable designers to envision real three dimensional habitats by shifting the value of land from a two dimensional concept to three. Under-utilized airspace can be capitalized and transformed into rich urban spaces. Volume thus becomes the standard of measurement for our built environment. The potential of three-dimensional space infill within the existing built environment provides us the flexibility we require to adapt our cities for future needs.

TRADING POD

SECURITY GATE

The word “occupy” has two meanings. The first is to “seize, capture and conquer”, and the second is “to reside and use.“ The first definition is provisional, as the action is momentary, thus it entices a beginning and an end. However, the second meaning demonstrates longevity, as the action evokes the desire of permanence. For the Occupy Urban Ordinance to function, both of these ideals must come into play in the planning of an urban intervention. It is in this ambiguity that designers can find creative interpretation and thus flexibility for our urban vitality.


Maximized Sun Exposure & Views As a three-dimensional urban intervention, the design aims to enrich the urban atmosphere while optimizing the functionality of the existing built environment. It provides access to the previously inaccessible NYSE National Historic Landmark by creating a Visitor Hall. Furthermore, the trading

floor is expanded below ground. A ramp along Broad Street provides universal access to the trading floor while providing secured access. This enables the design to reinstate the public space along Broad St in the form of a water feature and plaza. The Residential Tower hosts small but varied unit

types to encourage tenant socio-economic diversity. The tower’s main lobby faces New Street to separate residents from the tourist-heavy Broad Street. Nonetheless, the tower has accessible green roofs that host commercial and public functions that cater to both residents and visitors.


The residential tower was designed to minimize the impact that shafts, vertical circulation, and structure could impose on the NYSE trading floor. Thus the final composition is the direct result of the functional requirements and constrains each program places on one another. The site selection is a

key factor of the sustainable aspect of the development. The construction would require minimal site impact, excavation and construction waste. Solar orientation is taken into account as the final composition maximizes southern sun exposure to the residential units. Energy conservation

is addressed with the implementation of an intelligent ventilated double skin faรงade system. Finally an operable metal screen can be used not only for privacy but also to prevent direct solar heat gains during the hot summer months.


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TYPICAL APARTMENTS FACADE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

RIGID INSULATION FOAM FINISHED FLOOR REINFORCED CONCRETE CELLULAR DECKING CRADLE & BATTEN

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W16 STEEL FLANGE FIRE PROTECTION GYPSUM SUSPENDED CEILING MAIN STRUCTURE BEYOND MOTOR HOUSING

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TRIPPLE GLAZED PANEL FACADE STEEL STRUCTURE OPERABLE SCREEN FRAMELESS SLIDING DOOR GLASS BALLUSTRADE

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AUTOMATED WINDOW WINDOW RAIL SYSTEM ALUMINIUM FRAME METAL GRILL

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Two Bedroom Unit


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TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL TOWER LEVEL TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT 971 sq.ft 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

MASTER BEDROOM TV LOUNGE DINING KITCHEN WASH/DRYER BATHROOM SECOND BEDROOM COAT STORAGE

STUDIO UNIT 482 sq.ft 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

BEDROOM STUDY BATHROOM KITCHENETTE WASHER/DRYER

ONE BEDROOM UNIT 732 sq.ft 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

BEDROOM TV LOUINGE OFFICE/ STORAGE KITCHENETTE BATHROOM WASHER/DRYER

SHARED SPACE 1824 sq.ft 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

LIFT LOBBY WAITING LOUNGE HALL FIRE ESCAPE FIRE-LIFT

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UNDERGROUND LEVEL 1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

SECURITY CHECK TRADING FLOOR OFFICE SPACE MEDIA ROOM MECHANICAL ROOM ACCESS RAMP FIRE ESCAPE

GROUND LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

NYSE MAIN ENTRY VISITOR HALL STOCKS TRADING POD WATER FEATURE RESIDENTIAL LOBBY OPENING PODIUM FIRE ESCAPE


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TYPICAL LOFT LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

DOUBLE HEIGHT MULTI-PURPOSE LOUNGE & PANTRY SKY GARDEN ELEVATOR LOBBY ATRIUM FIRE ESCAPE

TYPICAL LOFT SPLIT LEVEL 1. BEDROOM 2. BATHROOM

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ELEVATOR LOBBY LOUNGE APARTMENT LOBBY WC & SHOWERS GYM

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2 BEDROOM UNIT STUDIO 1 BEDROOM UNIT ELEVATOR LOBBY FIRE-ESCAPE

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SECTION A

SECTION B


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URBAN DUALITY

Evansville, Indiana A!A Indianapolis Infinity Competition 2013 Individual Design Entry

The goal of the competition was to create a design for an urban lot in the downtown of Evansville at the corner of Adams and 2nd street. This lot is known as Haynie’s Corner , it is historically significant and it serves as an important anchor of the Art District.

The challenge asked all of the designers to envision any program, building type or art installation they seemed fit for the site’s context.


COMMUNITY EXPOSURE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN

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CHILDREN’S MUSEUM MUSEUM OF ART HISTORY & SCIENCE SUNSET PARK GOOSETOWN BAPTISTTOWN

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SITE PLAN 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

SECRET GARDEN

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SITE COMPOSITION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

MULTI PURPOSE PODIUM PEDESTRIAN CORRIDOR CHILDREN’S PLAZA WATER FOUNTAIN SUNKEN GARDEN

URBAN GRID SHIFT

EVOCATIVE URBAN GESTURES

ONE SITE: TWO SOLUTIONS

The grid shift is part of the original historic planning of the Evansville town. It demarked the transition between downtown and the residential neighborhoods of the first settlers. Haynies’s Corner is at the foremost of this grid shift and it is the forefront of the main path of approach to downtown.

The existing building covering the lot of Haynie’s Corner was a brick double height storage warehouse. The edge of this building has come to define the character of this urban lot. Keeping the tradition of the historic urban edge and the traditional brick construction character of the town, the design reutilizes the bricks from the existing building to create a porous wall where a solid wall once stood. The porous wall gives sense of the old urban edge, but it also allows a preview to the garden and plaza beyond, inviting pedestrians to wonder; what is behind the wall?

Haynie’s Corner presents to us the opportunity to explore the dichotomy that small American Towns face. The need to attract global attention with monumental structures while retaining the trivial nature of their regional charms, exposing the town to the global community while retaining the intimacy of the small town, and the need to design large scale urban-interventions while keeping to human scale proportions.

The angle bisector of these two grids creates an axis not obviously perceived by most residents of Evansville. As there are few tall buildings in the district, creating a tower that responds to this axis would allow residents and visitors to see the merging of these two aspects of Evansville daily life: Living & Work.

At different speeds, different urban gestures are needed. The brick monolith rises behind the urban edge to provide a visual icon to vehicular users.

Haynie’s Corner illustrates an architectural dichotomy that symbolizes our willingness to embrace Urban Duality.


ROOT RECTANGLE GEOMETRIC COMPOSITION

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Community Vibrance


ORIGIN OR ORI GINAL GIN A BUI AL B LDI BU LD NG G BL BLO LO OCK CK

LAN ANDSC AND DS APE DS E DI DIST STO TO OR RTI TI T ON O

TRA ANS NSP SPARE SP AREN NCY CY VS VS OP OPAQU AQUE AQ AQU

GAR AR RDEN DE EN & TE TE TERRA TER ERRAC RACE RACE

COMMUNITY VIBRANCE The design aims to reward those who are attentive to the evocative gestures of the monolithic brick forefront with a sense of discovery of a hidden vibrant community. The book tower displays to the city the residents who are in pursuit of knowledge, creating a facade whose colors are obtained from the constant book exchange and people activities. At the ground level, the plaza blends in with the children’s reading area and a multi-purpose space gives flexibility for the community to host varied events.


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LEVEL B1 INFORMATION DESK SMALL STUDY ROOM GROUP STUDY STORAGE SUNKEN GARDEN COMPUTER ROOM LOCKER ROOM UNISEX ADA WC LIBRARY/READING SPECIAL COLLECTION UNISEX ADA WC MEETING ROOM GROUP STUDY STORAGE

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GROUND LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

SECRET GARDEN OUTDOOR CAFE SITTING CAFE KITCHEN READING LOUNGE UNISEX ADA WC LIBRARY/READING CHILDREN PLAYGROUND CHILDREN BOOKS MULTI-PURPOSE INFORMATION DESK PEDESTRIAN ALLEY MAIN PROMENADE SMALL READING LOUNGE

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SMALL STUDY ROOM READING LOUNGE LIBRARY/READING ACCESSIBLE GREEN ROOF COPY ROOM SMALL READING LOUNGE

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SMALL STUDY ROOM READING LOUNGE LIBRARY/READING UNISEX ADA WC SMALL READING LOUNGE SMALL READING LOUNGE

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READING/ BOOK SHELVES VIEW ELEVATOR CORRIDOR ACCESIBLE GREEN ROOF SECRET GARDEN CHILDREN LIBRARY INFORMATION BOOTH SEPCIAL COLLECTION READING/ GROUP STUDY SUNKEN GARDEN COMPUTER ROOM LOKER ROOM/ SERVER ROOM ELEVATOR PIT

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Children’s Library


BUILT PROJECTS


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FORTE NANSHAN CLUBHOUSE

Chongqing, China in Collaboration with SPARK Architects Interior Design: One Plus Partnership Completed 2011

Nanshan is a large luxury villa community in the outskirts of Chongqing. In February 2011, SPARCH was asked to design a comprehensive leisure center for the community. The proposal included the landscape design approach, along with a 4000sqm showroom/clubhouse, a 12000sqm hotel and

13000sqm outdoor retail street. At the center of the Nanshan masterplan lays the Leisure Center. It functions as a mediating icon that brings residents, visitors, and all the elements of the master plan together. The clubhouse, completed in October of 2011, was formally conceived as a continuous folded loop


that pivots from a common double height space. The common space links together the different programmatic elements of the building; including a gym, a swimming pool, children playground, offices, arts-and-crafts classrooms, meeting rooms, a restaurant and a café.

The design responds to the client needs by allowing this common space to be temporarily utilized as a showroom and sales floor for the villas. Surrounding the clubhouse is a shallow reflective lake abundant with carp and lotus. Wooden platforms outline the periphery of the building and bridge

across the lake to connect the lobby with the residential villas. To minimize site impact, the building is incrusted in the existing topography. Thus the clubhouse seems to grow from the ground when approaching the main entry, and rising out of the reflecting water surface as you walk around it.


06

THAIHOT FUZHOU: FACADE & RETAIL STREET Fuzhou, China in Collaboration with SPARK Architects Completed August 2013

Fuzhou is a developing city in southern China. With many projects being constructed at unimaginable speeds, many designs take a wrong turn. The Thaihot Development group had begun work on the construction of a mix-use project, containing oďŹƒce and residential towers in the background, and

a freestanding retail mall at the foreground. A pedestrian alley allocated between the two volumes is outlined with sellable retail units to create a 24H dynamic environment. However, Thaihot was not content with the local architect’s design of the podium mall. SPARCH was approached to propose an


alternative vision for the design of the podium.The design takes foundation in the interplay of an indoor-outdoor shopping experience. The podium was re-programed to create 24H accessible terraces that allow certain programs of the mall to continue to operate after hours. The pedestrian environment

was reshaped to create a more dynamic experience. Outdoor escalators connect the terraces to the back alley, hence creating two distinct circulation loops, the interior 12H circulation and the exterior 24H route. Conceptually, the form of the mall was conceived as a precious jeweled that is broken

to spill its contents and activate the surroundings. Ideally, the project will become a destination in a place that is yet to have any. It will provide a lively urban space and access to world of commodities.


06

THAIHOT FUZHOU: INTERIOR

Fuzhou, China in Collaboration with SPARK Architects Completed August 2013

The interior design of the retail mall takes as reference the crystalline interior of a geode. The exterior of the mall is analogous to the crust of the geode, and the interior to its colorful crystalline interior. The design had limitations, since an existing structural grid which was implemented by

a local architect on its previous design, had to be respected. SPARCH, reorganized the escalator circulation system and added an express escalator that connects ground level with the fourth level. The atrium was sculptured to give a more dramatic “crystalline� appearance. The skylight was also


redesigned following a similar language. A ceramic frit pattern on the skylight glass was implemented to reduce the amount of direct heat gain. There are four ground level entries, the southern being the main entry. Each of the secondary entries were given a back lit perforated aluminum pattern and a

scrolling marquee embedded in the ground was added to guide users from the entry to the interactive information markers. A secondary feature, a multimedia hanging crystal above the information desk, provides a focus meeting point inside the atrium, while providing an opportunity to display

promotional campaigns. The design of the project was split into two contracts, faรงade and interior. Our integrated design approach won us both contracts. The design team work simultaneously on interior and faรงade design from concept through final SD approval.


07

VANKE A14 APARTMENTS

Foshan, China in Collaboration with Jaeger and Partner Phase 1 Completed December 2013

The A14 was developed to create affordable housing units to the residents of Foshan. The project was designed to meet the demands of young professional couples by providing its residents convenience, fun and a diverse life style. The site is located near the Guangzhou green metro line, which allows

the residents to easily commute to Guangzhou for work. The project contains seven towers that would be developed in four phases. Each level contains 36 units, composed of studio units, one bedroom units and two bedroom units. To achieve affordability the design had to achieve 80% efficiency


between shared space and sellable space. This proved to be the hardest challenge of the development, as a lot of research was conducted and full size interior mock-ups were built to determine the smallest size of a studio unit that could be built to meet Vanke quality standards. After several iterations

of the design, that included limitations on the height of the towers due to budget, a total of 8,820 aordable units will be constructed throughout a period of 5 years in development. The commercial podium with the green roof would provide the residents all the immediate necessities, such as groceries

and a fitness center. The project has several outdoor basketball and tennis courts accessible to the residents, as well as a swimming pool on the podium’s roof.


Curriculum Vitae

LEONARDO FRED MICOLTA DIAZ

Direct +86 151 1268 0426 lfmicolta@hotmail.com | SKYPE: lfmicolta Online Portfolio: http://issuu.com/lfmicolta/docs/2014

Nationality: Dual Citizenship U.S./ Colombia Birth: 14 May, 1987 Cali, Colombia

Education 09.2005 - 12.2010

California State Polytechnic University

09.2008 - 09.2009

Kyushu University Graduate School of Design

Pomona, California

5-year Professional Diploma Honors College Scholar, Cum Laude

Fukuoka, Japan

Academic Awards

Bachelor of Architecture

Modeling Software

Exchange Student

Proficiency Level

Professional Publications 2013 Concept Magazine: Issue 167 Jaeger & Partner: Hanking Nanyou Urban Design: page 78

2010 Kellogg Honors College Scholar 2010 Cal Poly President’s Honor List

Rhinoceros 4

Proficient

Microstation V8i 2D/3D

Proficient

2010 Cal Poly Outstanding Senior Project 2010 Bobby Brooks Interdisciplinary Studio Most Adventurous Master Plan

AutoCAD 2D/3D

Proficient

SketchUp 8

Proficient

Grasshopper

Basic

2008 Colin Hotaling Memorial Travel Scholarship

3dsMax 9

Basic

2008 Cal Poly Excellence in 3rd Year Architecture Design Studio

Design Awards 2010 LG Surfaces Design Challenge Honorable Mention

BIM Software

Proficiency Level

Revit 10

Proficient

ArchiCad 12

Proficient

Illustration Software

Proficiency Level

2005 Build Your Dream Vehicle Regional: 1st Place National: 1st Place

Artlantis Render 3

Proficient

V-Ray Rh/Max/Skp

Proficient

2005 Skills USA Website Design Regional: 1st Place National: 2nd Place

Photoshop CS5

Proficient

Illustrator CS5

Proficient

Indesign CS5

Proficient

Exhibitions 2010 Honors College Convocation, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Expo Urbana: T.O.D. for Los Angeles 2010 Spring Interim Student Exhibition, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Port of Los Angeles Masterplan 2009 Fall Interim Student Exhibition, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Cahuenga Elementary School 2009 Spring Interim Student Exhibition, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Silverlake Mix-used Housing 2009 Winter Interim Student Exhibition, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Wilderness Retreat Home 2008 Spring Interim Student Exhibition, Cal Poly Pomona Title: Louca Acomulcao Museum

Other Software

Proficiency Level

MS Word/Excell/PPT

Proficient

Ecotect 11

Intermediate

Dreamweaver CS5

Proficient

Processing

Basic

HTML/CSS

Intermediate

Languages

Proficiency Level

English

Fluent

Spanish

Fluent

Chinese: Mandarin

Basic

Japanese

Basic

2013 Archdaily: Thaihot City Plaza Mall: SPARK http://www.archdaily.com/327706/ 2012 Archdaily: Hanking Nanyou Urban Design: Jaeger & Partner http://www.archdaily.com/309401/ 2012 Urban Environment Design: UED Issue 061 SPARCH Forte Nanshan: Page 38 2012 Urbanism and Architecture: UA Issue 093 SPARCH Forte Nanshan: Page 41 2012 id+C Issue 213 SPARCH Forte Nanshan The Mountain 2012 Interior Designer China Architecture & Building Press: ID issue 034 SPARCH Forte Nanshan: Page 122 2012 Architecture & DETAIL: Issue 2012no.02 SPARCH: Forte Nanshan Clubhouse: Page 208 2012 Area China 100+17 Design Focus Water: SPARCH: Forte Nanshan page 194 2011 Archdaily: Forte Nanshan: SPARK http://www.archdaily.com/226699/ 2011 International Magazine of Space Design: BOB Issue 088 SPARCH: Thaihot Fuzhou Plaza. Page 75


Work Experience

Key Projects:

06.2012 - 06.2013

Project Architect Jaeger and Partner

Shenzhen, China Reference: Johannes Jaeger, Director jaeger@jaegerandpartner.com +86.755.2690.8620 Hanking Nanyou Urban Design Shenzhen, China Built Area: 1,800,000 sq.m Status: Ongoing Program: Mix-use Tasks: Concept Design of Master plan, Architecture & Landscape. Final Model Photography

Vanke A14 Foshan, China Built Area: 360,000 sq.m Status: Under Construction Program: Residential & Commercial Tasks: Master plan, Architecture and Landscape Design from CD to DD.

Taichung Culture Center Taichung, Taiwan Built Area: 25,000 sq.m Status:Open Competition Program: Museum & Library in Colaboration with: Pritzker Laureate Gottfried Bรถhm

Energy Tower Taichung, Taiwan Built Area: 25,000 sq.m Status: Invited Competition Program: Office Super-hirise Tasks: Presentation graphics, booklet and boards.

Forte Nanshan Chongqing, China Built Area: 2,000 sq.m Status: Built Program: Sales Center & Clubhouse Tasks: Master plan, Architecture & Landscape Design from CD to DD.

Thaihot City Plaza Fuzhou, China Built Area: 48,000 sq.m Status: Built Tasks: Architecture , Landscape, and Interior Design from CD to DD.

Busan Opera House Busan, South Korea Built Area: 25,000 sq.m Built Area: 25,000 sq.m Tasks: Preliminary Concept Design and Final model photography.

Shenzhen 1979 Shenzhen, China Built Area: 25,000 sq.m Status:Under Construction Tasks: Preliminary Concept Design and Facade Studies

06.2013-01.2014

06.2013-02.2014

09.2009-01.2011

06.2008-09.2008

06.2008-09.2008

Graphic Designer Jaeger and Partner

Director Col-Link Global Trade

Graphic Designer Micolta Creative Studio

Summer Intership Gensler

Summer Intership Bassenian Lagoni

02.2011 - 04.2012

Architect SPARCH

formerly ALSOP

Beijing, China Reference: Jan Clostermann, Director jfclostermann@ sparkarchitects.com +86.10.8402.1240

Relevant Experience

Shenzhen, China Reference: Johannes Jaeger, Director jaeger@jaegerandpartner.com +86.755.2690.8620

Hong Kong Business Owner International Trade Logistics

Los Angeles, California Business Owner Graphic Design, Website Design, Photography, Architectural Visualization

Los Angeles, California Reference: Darren Adkisson, Design Director d_adkisson@gensler.com +1.310.499.5600

Newport Beach, California Reference: Steven Dewan sdewan@bassenianlagoni.com +1.949.553.9100



Leonardo F. Micolta Diaz