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PORTFOLIO Leila Mottaghizadeh 2018


INWIND Project

01 Master of Architecture Studio C (InWind) Studio Work Jul.2016-Nov.2016

- Team Work - Responsibility: Fabrication Tutors: Stanislav Roudavski Alex Holland

Final Prototype - 1:1 - St. Kilda Beach


Melbourne is a city of unpredictable weather. Renowned for having four seasons in one day, the city can go from picturesque sunshine to stormy and back again in a few short hours. This makes it the perfect place to develop an alternative mode of architecture based on wind. Alternative modes of architecture can disrupt and force you to question what is and what could be. The revolutionary 1960s saw a surge of artists, thinkers and designers coming together in an attempt to give a big middle finger to permanence and commodification within architecture (and also to society in general). The work of Ant Farm, Archigram and Utopie have provided a strong foundation for us to build on, with their quirky explorations of inflatable architecture and designs. Fusing this with the work of more recent innovators, such as the work of world-renowned kite maker and flyer Peter Lynn, to develop a new approach to the question of what could be.


The culmination of this approach manifests as INWIND  – an environmental art installation that combines high performance kite-making and advanced digital fabrication. Deployed at St Kilda Beach, a 12 metre long air structure acts to materialise the conditions of the twilight hour and present them as spectacle for a surrounding audience. This temporal use of space integrates movement into a response that invites the audience to interact with, and shape their environment. In this sense, INWIND not only acts as the catalyst in forming a design approach, but actively participates in disseminating ideas and encouraging further development. INWIND is a provocation; an experience meant to produce new ways of thinking about the near future, optimistic futures, and critical, interrogative perspectives.


Soft Structures Soft structures follow the line of thought that ‘buildings are not, or should not be, immune to their environments’15. Soft structures are ‘resilient’ rather than ‘immune’ as their integrity is generated by their performative and responsive status within an environment. It is this relational status that makes soft structures the principle toolset within this project; acting as the mediators in a critical examination of design practice Within architectural practice, several key characteristics of soft structures can be exploited. These include (but are not limited to) the following traits: + Expressive of differential forces; indicative of surrounding dynamic systems. + Air-supported; the ability to delineate a vertical dimension. + Responsive and opportunistic to site conditions; being activated by latent forces + Readily deployable; flexible in terms of site, access, people. + Self-regulating; embodying a form of material intelligence. + Of relational status; generating space and experience through continuity and user interaction.


Isoptera

02 AA Visiting School Melbourne Design Methods 2.0 Jul.2017

- Team Work

- Tutors: Paul Loh Philippos Philippidas

Final Prototype scale: 1:50


This project is an exploration in a design method which uses several techniques, tools and materials forming the design and spatial outcome. Through this project a design process starting from physical modelling and with a focus on Materiality was explored, which later defined the specific way of approaching the design for the prototypes. Several materials, their specific qualities and interactions have been studied and experimented. These materials can be categorized in Three groups of solid, transparent and temporary materials that in this case are plaster, Epoxy casting resin, polystyrene and acetone. The materials and the way they interacted leaded to a unique form, texture and technique. This project is proposing a new lane-way which is providing a context for public, in a location that has a high potential for being occupied by a variety of programs and events. This design is providing a quality space with potential programs, open to public access and is letting them decide when and how to occupy it in different occasions.


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The matrix is developed upon a rule set of erosion, which explores the intensity and direction of erosion. The matrix is adopted as a tool to visualize the possible outcomes as the agent, acetone, react with the reactant, the cube of styrofoam. A range of 1 - 4 dimensions of the cube was eroded and explored with different magnitudes.

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MASSING TRANSFORMAIONB 7 E Transformation of avoidance Acurves into Structural & Circulative Volumes D

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The erosion rule set of the matrix was applied to the site. The area of the site was extruded to form the spatial volume and the boundary of where the reaction occurs. Aspects of circulation, light and programs are considered within the site boundary and acted as the avoidance which directs the erosion path.

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TAXONOMY OF EROSION I

MAGNITUDE OF EROSION DIRECTION OF EROSION

1. VERTICAL 1

1_D2

1_D1 Amount of Particle: 0.1 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 4 sec

1. VERTICAL 1 2. HORIZONTAL 1

Amount of Particle: 0.1 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 7 sec

2_D1 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 4 sec

1_D3 Amount of Particle: 0.1 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 10 sec

2_D2 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 5 sec

1_D4

2_D3 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 7 sec

1_D5 Amount of Particle: 0.13 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 19 sec

Amount of Particle: 0.1 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 15 sec

2_D4 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 12 sec

1_D6 Amount of Particle: 0.17 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 27 sec

2_D5 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 14 sec

1_D7 Amount of Particle: 0.4 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 27 sec

2_D6 Amount of Particle: 0.7 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

1_D8 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 27 sec

2_D7 Amount of Particle: 0.75 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 18 sec

1_D9 Amount of Particle: 3.0 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 27 sec

2_D8 Amount of Particle: 1.5 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 19 sec

2_D9 Amount of Particle: 3.0 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 19 sec

TAXONOMY OF EROSION II

MAGNITUDE OF EROSION DIRECTION OF EROSION

1. VERTICAL 1 2. HORIZONTAL 1 3. HORIZONTAL 2

3_D1 Amount of Particle: 0.3 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 6 sec

1. VERTICAL 1 2. HORIZONTAL 1 3. HORIZONTAL 2 4. DIAGONAL 1

3_D2 Amount of Particle: 0.3 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D1 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 4 sec

3_D3 Amount of Particle: 0.35 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D2 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 5 sec

3_D4 Amount of Particle: 0.45 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D3 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 7 sec

3_D5 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D4 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 12 sec

3_D6 Amount of Particle: 0.7 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D5 Amount of Particle: 0.6 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 14 sec

3_D7 Amount of Particle: 0.8 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D6 Amount of Particle: 0.7 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

3_D8 Amount of Particle:1.20 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D7 Amount of Particle: 0.75 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 18 sec

4_D8 Amount of Particle: 1.5 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 19 sec

3_D9 Amount of Particle: 1.5 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.2 Duration of Erosion: 16 sec

4_D9 Amount of Particle: 3.0 Motion Streak: 0.1 Particle Radius: 0.3 Duration of Erosion: 19 sec


SPATIAL INDEX POINTCLOUD ILLUSTRATION OF THE 3D SCAN OF PHYSICAL MODEL

A-A

SPATIAL QUALITY OF EROSION 1

SPATIAL QUALITY OF EROSION 2 Direction of Erosion: 4_D Magnitude of Erosion: D8 Duration of Erosion: 20 sec

Direction of Erosion: 1_D Magnitude of Erosion: D7 Duration of Erosion: 15sec

S_A

SQE 1_INDEX

SQE 2_INDEX

S_B


This project was a good experience in form of an intensive workshop which resulted in interesting prototypes. Forming a group and quickly starting a fast design process which started from physical modeling, was an opportunity to explore new methods. We tried to challenge the set of activities we had previously gone through in a design process, and explore new methodologies and techniques. We experimented several materials and their qualities such as plaster, polystyrene foam and acetone and started casting plaster models from the very first day. This was a great challenge for me to take the risk of actually making a model before studying and exploring different aspects of design and moving on with a design, material and fabrication techniques that we had not experienced before. The first prototype was quite successful and helped us explore new techniques and move forward with the initial idea and developing it. The sixth prototype which was in a larger scale and so called the “final� model, was also a prototype for us in which we tried brand new techniques and materials on it for the first time. Unfortunately due to the scale and the limitations in fabrication that come with it, the prototype failed to come out as it was intended. I believe this workshop provided us an extraordinary opportunity to put aside the regular methods and freely explore new design techniques. On the other hand, visiting tutors added a great value to the workshop. We had the chance to learn about their methods and views over architecture and through the public lectures and talks we learnt how these were reflected on their professional works. The project has already driven good attention from the critics and was well received through the exhibition.


EndGame

03 Master of Architecture Design Studio E Jul.2017-Nov.2017

- Individual Work In collaboration with NH Architecture

- Tutors: Dean Boothroyd Hamish Lyon Gumji Kang


Education and forms of delivering knowledge is changing today and universities are playing a different role in society. Through the process of development and growing, universities seek international exposure in the architecture on campus. How can the university have an internationally prestigious architecture profile and respond to new models of education?


Exploring the city in a focused view point on details, spatial characteristics and human interaction, was a basis for this project. The initial question was that in a project of nearly urban scale, what can the city teach us about ways of creating and organizing spaces of small scale, which interacts with public and every single user of it? This project brings together that medium of organisation of spaces with different scales and natures, and connects itself with the context, its infrastructure, and its users on university campus. Learning does not start or end at the gates of a campus, it is everywhere.


Different Scales of spaces

Large Scale Spaces : Auditoriums, Atrium

Medium Scales of spaces: Classrooms, Library, workshops, Labs

Small Scale Spaces : Meeting Rooms, Other

Informal Learning spaces, Services, Circulation


This document is a brief folio composed of brief reviews on three projects within the master of architecture course in university of Melbourne, School of Design. All content including diagrams, text and photos are taken from project journals and personal resources.


Leila.mottaghi.lm@gmail.com www.linkedin.com/in/leilamottaghizadeh 24/3 Holmes Street, Brunswick East, VIC3057 +61 447 527 953

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Brief Architecture Portfolio -2018

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