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Maintenance, lawncare and snow removal are also provided. Rent is based on income for this federally funded project. The Overton Public Schools provide instruction for students in grades K-12. A Class D-1 school, Overton’s current enrollment is 286. Superintendent is Mark Aten and the office number is 987-2424. The population at the 2000 census was 665, up from 633 in 1980. For more information contact: Overton Village Clerk, Kristi Purintun, 987-2433. Village Board: Mark Dolan, chairman; Marlene Olmstead, Troy Olmstead, Howard Roth and Jean Raney. Village Office Hours: 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Utilities Superintendent: Stan Jeffries.

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was in charge of men guarding construction workers on the Union Pacific Railroad. It continued to be part of the nation’s cross-country transportation system as first the Lincoln Highway, and later U.S. Highway 30 passed through the community. A historic Lincoln Highway bridge is located just east of the village and was refurbished recently by members of the Overton Boy Scouts. Last year construction was completed on a new overpass that provided a safer link for citizens and emergency personnel over the railroad tracks to Interstate 80. Overton is also a fun place to go antique hunting with not one, but two businesses offering treasures from yesteryear. Foster Lumber opened in 2004 and R & S Market provides a communitygathering place and grocery stop. Homestay Village offers eight onebedroom apartments for the elderly and disabled one block from downtown, the post office and senior center where noon meals are served.

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• Commercial properties • Lake properties • Acreages • Residential listings in Lexington & surrounding areas Service

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2011 Dawson County 411

Dawson County has what it takes

Progress seems to be synonymous with Dawson County. Even in the midst of economic hardships, Dawson County continues to elevate itself and its citizens. Nearly all of the communities continue to experience economic upswings with a variety of developmental projects launched or completed. Lexington is expanding with construction that is. Tri-County

Lexington High School and Morton Elementary School. LHS added new classrooms and a state of the art band room. Morton Elementary was the recipient of a new gymnasium and in 2010 Pershing Elementary also added a new gymnasium. The former Walmart building across from Tyson’s Fresh Meats, Inc., was purchased by the city and is in the last phase of revamping the space within it to become a center for educational development. The building did serve as a FEMA assistance base for those seeking help from the floods of 2008. News and Information for Dawson County Newspapers based in Dawson County are the Lexington ClipperHerald, the Overton Beacon-Observer, the Hospital is in the middle of a three-phase con- Tri-City Tribune in Cozad and the Gothenstruction projected burg Times. The Elwood aimed to expand on Bulletin and the Fort existing facilities and Kearney Post also circuturn the emergency room into a more easily late in Dawson County. accessible place to visit. Newspapers With the first phase The Lexington completed last year, Clipper-Herald is diswork on the next two tributed on Wednesdays phases is soon to follow. and Saturdays. SubIn 2008, construction scription rates are $48 was completed on per year for Lexington, expansions for rural Lexington, ElHeartland Museum of wood, Overton, Cozad, Military Vehicles, Gothenburg, Eddyville,

Oconto, Sumner, Smithfield, Bertrand and Elm Creek, and $58 per year elsewhere. Papers are available at racks or dealers throughout Dawson County for 75 cents. For information call 308-3245511. The Gothenburg Times is published each Wednesday by Greg and Kathi Viergutz. Subscription rates are $29.95 per year in Dawson County, Brady and Arnold; $32.50 per year in the remainder of Nebraska; and $38 per year for subscribers outside Nebraska. Single copies are 75 cents each or $2.25 if mailed. To subscribe, call 308-5373636. The Tri-City Tribune is published by Dean Dorsey and is distributed on Thursdays. Subscription rates are $29.50 per year for home delivery and immediate area and $39.50 for out of county and elsewhere Nebraska and out-of-state, or 75 cents per copy off the rack. To subscribe call 308784-3644. Radio Carrying local news are: Lexington’s KRVNAM (880 KHz) and KRVN-FM (93.1 MHz); Kearney’s KRNY (1460 KHz), KQKY-FM (105.9 MHz), KGFW (1340

KHz); and North Platte’s KJLT (970 KHz), KODY (1240 KHz) and KELN (1410 KHz). The Lexington radio station generally carries information about area school closings, due to inclement weather, during early morning broadcasts. Television Television stations carrying local and area news are KLNE-TV, Lexington, Channel 3; KNOP-TV, North Platte, Channel 2; KPNE, North Platte, Channel 9; KOLN/KGIN-TV, Lincoln/Grand Island, Channel 10/11; KHGITV, Channel 13, Kearney. In Lexington the local educational access channel is Channel 6. For information on cable TV service in Cozad, call 1-888-6006626. For information on cable TV service in Eustis or Farnam, call Consolidated Cable at 1800-742-7464. For information on cable TV service in Gothenburg, call 1-888600-6626. For information on cable TV service in Lexington, contact the North Platte office of Charter Communications, 1510 E. Fourth St.,

1-877-800-9175. Internet Access to the World Wide Web is available in Dawson County through a variety of sources. Check with your local cable service provider or phone book listings for Internet providers. Community College The Central Community College System encompasses 25 counties and has learning centers in Cozad, Lexington, Gothenburg, Arapahoe, Cambridge, Beaver City and Kearney. A Distance Learning Program provides opportunities for students to complete a business and management degree through off-campus students. The business and management degree program uses state-ofthe art teaching technologies for delivery of courses. Satellite courses, computer conferencing and other interactive programs allow students to complete degree work without driving to one of the campuses. Central Community College works with area industries, retail establishments and other agencies and organizations in planning inservice or in-plant

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southwest of the present village. Officials of the Kearney and Black Hills Railroad whose line opened through the Wood River Valley that fall changed the name to Eddyville on Nov. 12, 1890. The village was named for a Miss Eddy, an acquaintance of John H. Hamilton, president of both the railroad and the Wood River Improvement Co., which bought and platted the community in the summer of 1890. Eddyville is nestled in the beautiful Wood River Valley in northeast Dawson County along Nebraska Highway 40. Small, but mighty, might be a good description for Eddyville, which strives to provide wholesome, familyoriented activities for its citizens and those who stop to visit. Annual events include a wild game feed in January featuring wild turkey, deer, elk and Canadian fish, harvested by local hunters both in Nebraska and abroad, and in February there is a community pancake feed. Both of these events are sponsored by the Eddyville Volunteer Fire Department. Highlight of the year, however, is the annual Dinner Theater at the Eddyville Community Building. This year the event reached its 29th anniversary. The melodrama featured local actors and actresses and homemade soup and pie were served to guarantee a great time by those attending. Proceeds help the Eddyville Methodist Church and maintenance of the community building. The Eddyville Trail Riders will host their 41th annual rodeo the third weekend in June. The rodeo is approved by the Nebraska State Rodeo Association and the Mid-States Rodeo Association. A street dance follows the Saturday night performance. It’s the orneriest little rodeo in the valley. Eddyville is the home of the famous “Buzzard’s Roost,” a deep, long canyon about one mile north of Eddyville. The Buzzard’s Roost was originally about 2,520 acres in Custer County owned by John B. Colton. One canyon has a large cave that reportedly was a haven for rustlers and robbers. You can still enjoy the scenery of the Roost by participating in the annual spring and fall Trail Rides through Buzzard’s Roost. There is a spring in May and a fall ride in September.

Eddyville

A sack lunch at Buzzard’s Roost provides a nice break before the riders return to town for a barbecue. For those not wishing to ride a horse, horse-drawn racks will be available. The 3rd annual Eddyville Mud Drags will be September 19th. The proceeds from this event are donated to the Eddyville Community Building. This makes for a September weekend full of good times. Wrapping up the year is the “Soup and Santa” activity December 13th. Proceeds are used to help maintain the community’s holiday decorations. Local businesses include the Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, with daily lunch specials Monday through Friday with menu items off the grill from 5:00-9:00 on Monday through Saturday evenings. In Good Taste, featuring catering and homemade baked items, Eddyville Credit Union, Stryker Tractor Repair, which sells and services tractors and sells Dixon mowers, Mill Iron West Leather Shop, Barb’s Beauty Shop, The Busted Knuckle Garage, a full service mechanic shop, which does everything from auto, light truck, small engine, irrigation motors and fabrication, U.S. Post Office and The Eddyville Pit Stop, a gas station and hardware store. The Eddyville Rural Fire District covers a 193-square-mile territory that includes the rugged canyons of northeast Dawson County. There are 40 members on the fire department and two emergency medical service members.

The Eddyville Methodist Church is the community’s lone active congregation with service every Sunday mornings at 10 a.m. Two UMW Circles meet monthly.

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The Catholic Church is used for special services and events such as All Soul Day, St. Patrick’s Day and bingo. Other local organizations include Buzzard Chicks, Red Hat Ladies and the American Legion Auxiliary. Eddyville is part of the SumnerEddyville-Miller Schools, a Class II K12 school in rural Dawson County, with property in Custer and Buffalo Counties as well. Nearly 200 students attend school in the district, which has a 206 square-mile boundary. The district qualifies as a Title I school and competes in extra-curricular activities in the D-2 category, the smallest of high schools in Nebraska. Average class size is 15 students. For more information contact: Eddyville Village Clerk: Kay Kennicutt, 858-4535 Overton was settled in 1873 by the James M. Potter family and the post office was established on June 3, 1873. The community was named in honor of a government official who

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Keystone, situated two miles east of where Farnam is located today, was the original site of the early settlers of Farnam who later moved to what is Farnam. Farnam was named in honor of Henry Farnam, a railroad builder and philanthropist who was born in New York in 1803. Many former residents report that Saturday night was a really big deal with everyone coming in and streets being pack. Some even took in a show. Farnam is a feisty community, evidenced by its’ ability to bounce back from a devastating fire last March that claimed the community fire hall and meeting room. Three fire-fighting vehicles were destroyed, and those that were res-

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Farnam

cued, including a new pumper truck suffered smoke and heat damage. Through the course of the summer residents worked through state and federal agencies to obtain grants to build a new fire hall and meeting room, as well as raise money of their own. The new structure is nearly double the size of the old fire hall and includes a hazardous materials room, a lounge and enlarged community room. Farnam has contracts with Dawson County for law enforcement. The 911 emergency number goes to Frontier County at Curtis and they dispatch the information out on pagers to individuals who are on the fire department and EMT squad. The Farnam and Eustis Schools

merged in 1997 and at the time of the merger, there were 347 students in the district. Current enrollment is 213. Superintendent is Carl Dietz, a 1975 graduate of Farnam High School. Despite challenges brought on by the merger and fiscal pressures that accompany declining enrollment, the district is committed to quality, innovative educational opportunities and students continue to exceed national averages on norm-referenced assessments. Farnam has three churches Catholic, Methodist and Nazarene and each maintains regular services and activities. Community activities each year include a community carnival February 23 and Founder’s Day, a

2011 Dawson County 411

Where to call in Dawson County

weekend of activities set for June. Also in the spring is an annual Easter Egg Hunt for the smaller children. The community continues to work on more grants to help improve the village for the future. The Youth Community Improvement Program is more active again and has been involved in recycling aluminum cans, fixing up the village tennis court, helping with trash pickup along the highway and more. For more information contact: Farnam Village Clerk, Norma Darnall, 308-569-2355. Originally named Congdon, this tiny Dawson County community traces its beginnings to a post office established May 23, 1881, three miles

training programs. Call 324-8480 or toll-free at 1-877-222-0780. All local area codes are (308):

EMERGENCY Emergency (police, fire, ambulance) - 911 Lexington Food Pantry, 931 W. Seventh, 324-4219 Love In Action (clothing, light housekeeping items), 907 W. Eighth, Lexington, 324-5353 Seventh-Day Adventist Church (clothing), 1520 E. St., Gothenburg, 537-3339 Parent-Child Center (domestic violence, sexual assault), 1001 N. Washington, Lexington, 324-2336 24-hour Crisis Line (in Lexington), 324-3040; 24-hour Crisis Line toll-free, 1-800-215-3040 Dawson County Civil Defense, 3243011 LAW ENFORCEMENT Nebraska State Patrol, 1-800-5255555 Lexington Police Department (Acting Chief Tracy Wolf), 324-2317 Gothenburg Police Department (Chief Randy Olson), 537-3608 Cozad Police Department (Chief Mark Montgomery), 784-2366 Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department (Sheriff Gary Reiber), 324-3011 Dawson County Crimestoppers (callers can report crime information anonymously), 1-866-652-7383 Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline, 1-800422-4453 Dawson County Probation Office, 324-5615 HEALTH/MEDICAL

Tri-County Community Health and Fitness Center, 1600 W. 13th St., Lexington, 324-6884 Tri-County Hospital, 13th and Erie, Lexington, 324-5651 Tri-County Hospice, 13th and Erie, Lexington, 324-8300 Maternal Health Clinic, 207 E. Sixth, Lexington, 324-6223 Plum Creek Medical Group, 1103 Buffalo Bend, Lexington, 324-6386 Plum Creek Surgery, 1101 Buffalo Bend, Lexington, 324-5660 Lexington Chiropractic Center, 104 W. Seventh St., 324-5948 Park Avenue Estates, 1811 Ridgeway, Lexington, 324-5490 Plum Creek Care Center and WELLife at Plum Creek, 1505 N. Adams, Lexington, 324-5531 Homestay Village, 503 B St., Overton, 784-3661 Elwood Care Center, 607 Smith Ave., Elwood, 785-3302 Cozad Community Medical Clinic, 1803 Papio Lane, Cozad, 784-3535 Cozad Wellness Center, 218 E. 16th, Cozad, 784-5100 Golden LivingCenter, 318 W. 18th, Cozad, 784-3715 Stone Hearth Estates, 110 20th St., Gothenburg, 537-7771 Hilltop Estates, 2520 Ave. M, Gothenburg, 537-7138 Gothenburg Memorial Hospital, 910 20th, Gothenburg, 537-3661 Gothenburg Family Practice Associates, 902 20th., Gothenburg, 537-7131 Gothenburg Medical Arts Building, 610 10th St., Gothenburg, 537-3673 Tri-County Hospital Home Health Care, 1600 W. 13th St., Lexington, 3248300

Lexington Family Eyewear, 111 E. Eighth St., Lexington, 324-5631 Central Plains Home Health (Cozad), 300 E. 12th St., Cozad, 7844630 or 1-800-243-9872 Lifeline (24-hour personal emergency response system), 784-4630 Cancer Information Services, 1-800422-6237 National AIDS Hotline (callers remain anonymous, open 24 hours), 1-800-232-4636. Nebraska Department of Health, 200 S. Silber St., North Platte, (308) 535-8134 Al-Anon Family Groups, 1-800-3442666 Heartland Counseling and Consulting Clinic, 307 E. Fifth St., Lexington, 324-6754 Four Roads Counseling, 513 N. Grant St., Lexington, 324-0222 Lutheran Family Services, 207 W. 7th St., Lexington, 324-6223 Alcohol Treatment Referrals, National 24-hour help and referral network, 1-800-252-6465 Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, National Referral Service, 1-800-662-4357

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Mental Health, Drug & Alcohol 24hour Crisis Line, 534-6963 (call collect) Hotline for Disability Services (Voice/TTY), 1-800-742-7594 Poison Control Center (Voice/TTY/TDD), 1-800-222-1222 FAMILY SERVICES Dawson County Immunization Clinic, Clinic of Good Health, 1-877209-3723 x143 Department of Health and Human Services, 800 N. Washington, Lexington, 324-6633 Community Action Partnership of Mid-Nebraska (immunization), 931 W. Seventh Street, Lexington, 324-4219 National Hotline for Missing and Exploited Children, 1-800-843-5678 Girls and Boys Town National Hotline, 1-800-448-3000, TDD 1-800-4481833 Runaway Teen Hotline, 1-800-7862929 Dawson County Parent-Child Center, 324-2336 or 1-800-215-3040 Compassionate Friends (support for bereaved families), 324-3538 Women, Infant and Children (WIC

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2011 Dawson County 411

Program), 324-6212 Lexington Area United Way, (Services for families and children by referral), 324-5774

Parkway, 324-1841 COZAD SCHOOLS Cozad High School, 17th and Meridian, 784-2744 Cozad Middle School, 1810 Meridian, 784-2746 East Elementary, 420 E. 14th, 7843462 Cozad Early Education Center (preschool), 420 W. 14th, 784-3381

HOUSING Lexington Housing Authority, 3244633 Cozad Housing Authority, 784-3661 Gothenburg Housing Authority, 537-7275 Eustis-Farnam Housing Authority, 784-3661 Overton Housing Authority, 7843661 ADULT EDUCATION Lexington Community Education (Adult Ed, English as a Second Language, GED), 324-8480 Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 302 E. 6th, 324-5504 Cozad Chamber of Commerce, 135 W. Eighth, 784-3930 Gothenburg Chamber of Commerce, 1021 Lake Avenue, 5373505 Lexington United Way, 324-5774 Dawson County Museum, 805 N. Taft, Lexington, 324-5340 Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles, 606 Heartland Rd.,

Lexington, 324-6329 100th Meridian Museum, 206 E. Eighth, Cozad, 784-1100 Robert Henri Museum/Hendee Hotel, 218 East Eighth Street, Cozad, 784-4154. LEXINGTON SCHOOLS Superintendent’s office, 300 S. Washington, 324-4681 Lexington High School, 13th and Adams, 324-4691 Lexington Middle School, 1100 N. Washington, 324-2349

Lexington Developmental Center, 17th and Washington, 324-6414 Bryan Elementary School, 1003 N. Harrison, 324-3762 Morton Elementary School, 505 S. Lincoln, 324-3764 Pershing Elementary School, 1104 N. Tyler, 324-3765 Sandoz Elementary School, 1711 N. Erie St., 324-5540 Head Start, 931-1/2 W. Seventh, 3245282 Lexington Early Learning Academy, 1501 S. Plum Creek

GOTHENBURG SCHOOLS Gothenburg Superintendent’s Office, 537-3653 Gothenburg Junior/Senior High School, 1415 G Street, 537-3651 Dudley Elementary School, 1415 G Street, 537-7178 Liberty Heights Christian School, 3307 Lake Ave., 848-4740 OVERTON SCHOOLS Overton schools, 401 Seventh Street, 987-2424 SUMNER-EDDYVILLE-MILLER High School, 762-2925 Topography Lexington is 2,408 feet above sea level.

Sumner first appeared on the map when the post office was established there on Aug. 6, 1889. Named for Sen. Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, an advocate of the abolition of slavery, Sumner was surveyed in June and platted in July of 1890. Located along the Wood River the fun-loving folks in Sumner enjoy several community gatherings each year and work on community improvements with a team spirit. Annual activities include a community Easter Egg Hunt, a big Fourth of July celebration with a rodeo on July 3 at 1:30 p.m. and another rodeo session on the Fourth at 7 p.m. There is a rodeo dance on the Fourth and a big parade every year with 90100 entries. Other activities on the Fourth include a volleyball tournament, foot races, a boat race, the Firemen’s Barbecue, a car show, crafts, money pile, live entertainment, fireworks and more. In September the community hosts a back-toschool picnic, and in December a Soup and Santa night. The Sumner Commercial Club, Sumner Saddle Club, Sumner EMT’s and Fire Department all work together to make these annual events a huge success. Sumner is the home of Tub’s Pub, famous for home cooking, big homemade, chicken-fried steaks, prime rib and lots more. Sumner has two churches, the United Church

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and Grace Lutheran Church. Sumner’s community park is one of the nicest ones around, featuring a sod house and plenty of shade and Sumner offers youth softball and baseball programs during the summer. Our school is consolidated with the communities of Sumner, Eddyville and Miller (SEM) all sending students to the K-12 Class D-2 school. We have 182 students and the community is very proud of all the youth activities in sports and academics. We are known as the “Home of the Mustangs.” Our town currently has a population of 229. The proud businesses of Sumner include: Steve’s Welding Shop, Ed’s Body Shop, Sumner Market, All Points Cooperative, Moorman’s Feed, Five Points Bank, Dawson Public Power, S & S Plumbing, Sleicher Heating and Air, The Mane Salon, Butch’s Repair and Used Cars, Schueter’s Body Shop, Wee-Care Daycare and of course, Tub’s Pub. Sumner Village Clerk: Maria Hollander, 752-3015. The village has regular board meetings on the second Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Sumner Community Hall. Board chairman is Darrell Barta with board members including Clifford Hemenway, Joe Dodd, Dave Irwin and Cory Ansbach. Farnam is located in southwest Dawson County with Lincoln County one-half mile west and Frontier County one-half mile south.

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2011 Dawson County 411

For Confidential Information, Support and Assistance

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Cozad Berean Church 16th and O 308-784-3675 Living Hope Assembly of God 1800 Kiowa Lane 308-784-4761

Church of Christ 18th and D 308-537-2164 Evangelical Free 1721 Lake Ave. 308-537-2261

Cozad Christian Church 821 Ave. F 308-784-4808

Faith Chapel 520 Ninth St. 308-537-7516

Cozad First Church of The Nazarene 919 Ave. H 308-784-3738

First Baptist Church 1002 Ave. C 308-537-2503

First Church of God 210 E. 14th St. 308-784-4074 First Presbyterian Church 819 E. St. 308-784-2717 GOTHENBURG Banner United Methodist Church 308-537-3258

First Presbyterian Church 1020 Lake Ave. 308-537-2210 First United Methodist Church 1401 Lake Ave. 308-537-2560 New Hope Evangelical Free 308-537-2812

Catholic Church 1915 Ave. J 308-537-3364 Seventh-Day Adventist 1520 Ave. D 308-537-3339 Svea Dahl Church Rural Brady 308-584-3544 Victory Assembly of God 2611 Lake Ave. 308-537-3047 Zion Evangelical Lutheran N. Hwy. 47 308-537-3194 FARNAM Farnam Church of the Nazarene 503 Main St. 308-569-2514 Farnam Methodist 303 Caribou St. 308-569-2532

EDDYVILLE Eddyville United Methodist 308-858-4918 OVERTON First Christian Church 601 C. Street 308-234-6816 Holy Rosary Church 503 D Street 308-987-2379

Our Lady of Good Counsel

United Methodist Church 401 6th Street 308-987-2223 SUMNER United Church of Sumner 308-752-9001 You are invited to visit Sumner, a northeast Dawson County community, located 20 miles northeast of Lexington.

Lexington is located on level terrain composed of deep, medium-textured soil developed on a welldrained and moderately wet terrace. The uplands on either side of the community are level to gently rolling to moderately rolling. Lexington Parks and Recreation Lexington has six parks covering more than 99 acres. Facilities include swimming pools, picnic tables, shelters, playground equipment, tennis courts, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, baseball/softball fields, soccer fields, volleyball, sand volleyball and a skate park. The city has 14 playgrounds with playground equipment and open play areas. Recreation programs include basketball, volleyball, softball, baseball, tennis, Plum Creek Road Race, soccer and adult supervised gym activities. For more information call Community Activities Director Ann Luther, 324-2498. Lexington has facilities for: Soccer: The city sponsors youth soccer each year and adult league

Lexington

soccer meets on Sundays at the soccer fields south of St. Ann’s Parish Center on Taft Street. The Optimist Recreation Complex near the airport on West 13th Street includes five soccer fields. Baseball: The Lexington Legion Field is located at the Optimist Recreation Complex on West 13th St. near the airport. Softball: Fields are scattered throughout the community. Three are located at the Rec Complex. Indoor hitting facility: A new indoor hitting facility for baseball and softball opened in 2006 at the Optimist Recreation Complex. It provides space for Baseball/Softball and golf warm-ups. The City of Lexington recreation director coordinates its use. Golf: Lakeside Country club, a private 18-hole grass greens course with clubhouse, is located at Johnson Lake, about 9 miles south of Lexington. There are also two golf courses about 13 miles away, one near Cozad in the west, and one near Overton in the east. Swimming: A family aquatic cen-

2011 Dawson County 411

ter with zero-depth (beach-type) entry, water slide and diving pit is near Memorial Park, Ninth and Monroe. The facility also includes a snack bar, sand volleyball court, sand play area and a splash pad. Swimming lessons are offered and the Lexington Swim Association sponsors a swim team. Tennis: Twelve lighted tennis courts and organized men’s, women’s and youth leagues are offered through the Lexington Women’s Tennis Association. For information call Mary Maloley, 324-2156. Fishing: Excellent fishing at Plum Creek Park’s six-acre lake, as well as Johnson Lake, the Platte River, Interstate 80 lakes, Tri-County Canal, Elwood Reservoir, Gallagher Canyon and many ponds and sandpits. Hunting: Area hunting for ducks, geese, wild turkey, upland birds and deer. Bowling: Strike and Spare, 1408 N. Adams, offers bowling on 12 lanes, with many organized leagues. 3244675. Boating: Boating at Johnson Lake, and canoeing on the Platte River.

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Skateboarding: A skate park, built in 2006, is located in Oak Park, at the corner of Plum Creek Parkway and Oak. Grand Generation Center, 407 E. Sixth, Lexington, provides many recreational activities, including dancing, strength training, quilting, cards and pool for area seniors. The center, administered by the city, serves noon meals on weekdays and provides “Meals on Wheels” and Handi-Bus services. For more information, call Director Ann Luther, 3242498. Johnson Lake, nine miles south of Lexington on U.S. Highway 283, has a surface area of 3,030 acres and 20 miles of shoreline, providing excellent fishing, swimming, boating and skiing. More than 900 families have built homes and cabins adjoining the lake. Two state recreation areas provide facilities for camping, playground equipment, shower and restroom facilities and picnic equipment in tree-shaded areas. Two public docks, restaurants, boat rental and service, marina and an

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6th & Jackson • P.O. Box 626 Lexington, NE 68850 (308) 324-5551

Offering the most thorough exams and highest quality eyewear in the tri-city area.

Ted J. Harvey & Jason T. Seim Office: 308.324.5631 Fax: 308.324.3096

Doctors of Optometry 801 N. Grant St. • P.O. Box 637 Lexington, NE 68850


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aircraft landing strip are available at Johnson Lake. The Johnson Lake Yacht Club sponsors an annual invitational regatta with entries from several surrounding states. During the spring and fall the lake is a resting place for thousands of ducks and geese migrating along the nation’s central flyway. Starting in late February, the Sandhill cranes begin arriving and by mid-March, 70 percent of the world’s Sandhill cranes crowd a 150mile stretch of the Platte River through Central Nebraska. Prime viewing spots to see the majestic cranes are along river roads south of Highway 30, between Lexington and Kearney. Photographers and ornithologists from across the nation come to Central Nebraska to witness and record the spectacular sight of more than 200,000 sandhill cranes during their migratory stay in the area. The Lexington area is also a winter nesting site for an estimated 250 bald eagles. They feed primarily below the Central Nebraska Public Power District J-2 Hydroplant southeast of town. The J-2 Eagle Viewing Site is open to the public, free of charge, usually from December through January. For information, call the Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 324-5504. Dawson County Historical Museum, 805 N. Taft, offers 30,000 square feet of exhibit rooms displaying an outstanding collection of historical and pioneer artifacts, many of which were donated by families of pioneers who traveled the trails to settle Lexington and the surrounding area. The museum complex houses many examples of china and glassware, historic clothing and quilts, furniture, farm machinery and wagons, Native American artifacts, the locally-built McCabe Baby Biplane, a log cabin, train depot and an early rural school house built in 1888. The museum also houses on-going paleontology work on “Big Al,” a mammoth skeleton discovered north of Cozad, and features an art

gallery and archives for genealogical and other historical research. For information, call Dawson County Museum Director Barb Vondras, 3245340. Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles, located at the Lexington I-80 exit, features military vehicles and memorabilia from WW I, WW II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars as well as Operation Desert Storm. A living museum, nearly all the vehicles are fully operational and they have appeared in films, parades, festivals and veterans reunions. The building also houses a gift shop, public restrooms and educational displays. For information, call Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Director Gary Gifford, 6329. The settlement of the West was a tumultuous time and two sites of Indian raids are commemorated near Lexington. Turkey Leg Raid Site, three miles west of Lexington, is the place where a Union Pacific Train was derailed and attacked by Indians. Plum Creek Massacre Cemetery, 14 miles southeast of Lexington, is where the victims of an Indian raid on a wagon train were buried. The Oregon Trail marker also is located south of Lexington. For directions, call the Dawson County Museum, 324-5340, or the Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 324-5504. Lexington Celebrations Annual celebrations include Cinco de Mayo in May, the Plum Creek Rodeo in June, an Old Fashioned Fourth of July celebration, the Johnson Lake Regatta, the Dawson County Fair in late July or early August, the Lexington Labor Day Antiques and Crafts Extravaganza and Hispanic Heritage Festival in September. Lexington Education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the superintendent’s office, 324-4681. New students must have a current immunization record

and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. School District No. 1 in Dawson County, also known as Lexington Public Schools, covers approximately 38.3 square miles and has a total enrollment of nearly 3,000. The district is accredited by the State of Nebraska and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. Lexington has four elementary schools: Pershing, Bryan, Morton and Sandoz. The middle school, located between 11th and 12th Streets along North Washington, was built in 1914, with additions in 1928, 1979, 1997 and 2000. Recent renovations include a new band room and chorus room. The school’s historic auditorium has also been refurbished with new seats, curtains and a state-of-the-art sound and lighting system, paid for in part by contributions from local businesses, individuals and organizations through a $1 million fund drive spearheaded by The Lexington Foundation. The high school, built in 1961, contains additions built in 1970, 1992, 1997, 2000 and 2008. Renovations include the construction of a new gymnasium and classrooms and the addition of a new vocational technology building and vocal/band room. Vocational courses offered in the high school include construction, careers, shop, industrial technology, architecture, drafting, woodworking, business systems, business law, business economics, and family and consumer science. Each school building contains facilities for the education of handicapped children, including a pre-school facility for students up to age 5 at Sandoz Elementary and at the Dawson County Opportunity Center with the Lexington Learning Academy classrooms. ESL courses are also offered throughout the system. City Government Lexington operates on a council/manager form of government. The public elects the council members for four-year terms; they in turn select the mayor for a

Dawson County Churches

Sixth and Madison 308-324-3095

Buffalo Grove Presbyterian Located six miles north of Lexington to Cozad Rd., four miles west, then one north. 308-324-4211 Calvary Assembly of God 13th and Adams 308-324-5310 Asamblea Centro Evangelico Maranatha 501 S. Madison 308-324-0127 Church of Christ 1211 N. Tyler St. 308-324-5022 Evangelical Free 810 S. Washington St. 308-324-3825

two-year term and hire the city manager. The Lexington City Council meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month, 5:30 p.m., at the City Municipal Building, 406 E. Seventh Street. Meetings are open to the public, and an agenda, kept continuously current, is available at the city office. Citizens asking the council to take action on an issue can be placed on the council agenda by calling the city manager, 324-2341. The city office also is the place to pay your utility bill and purchase building permits. Fire Protection Fire protection in Lexington is provided by a 40member volunteer fire department, with headquarters across the street east of the municipal building. Emergency and ambulance services, as well as mutual aid, also are provided. Protection in the rural area

is provided on a contract basis with the Lexington Rural Fire Department. Law Enforcement The Lexington Police Department employs 18 fulltime police officers and two full-time civilian workers. Dispatch services are coordinated with the Dawson County Dispatch System. Fire and police dispatch duties in Lexington are consolidated at the Lexington Law Enforcement Center, corner of Eighth and Grant, next to the Dawson County Courthouse. The Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, located at the corner of Eighth and Grant in Lexington, employs 66, including office, dispatch, jail employees and sheriff ’s deputies. If you need law enforcement assistance at night, call the Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, 324-3011, or go to the Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and use the night-entry door between

First Baptist Church 713 Monroe 308-324-2909 First Christian 1206 N. Erie 308-324-2244 First Lutheran Church Highway 21 to Buffalo Rd., 4 1/2 miles west 308-324-6263 First Presbyterian Church 801 N. Lincoln 308-324-5507 First United Methodist Church 201 E. Eighth 308-324-2397 Grace Lutheran Church

105 E. 17th 308-324-2496

Iglesia Adventista del Septimo Dia Sabados Lexington 308-324-7111 Iglesia Cristiana Pentecostes 2003 Plum Creek Parkway 308-324-6586

Northside Church of Christ 704 E. Sixth St. 308-324-4182 Parkview Baptist 803 W. 18th St. 308-324-4410

Iglesia de Dios Camino de Santidad 500 N. Monroe St.

St. Ann’s Catholic Church (Iglesia Catolica De Santa Ana) 6th and Jackson Parish Offices: 1003 Taft St. 308-324-4647

Iglesia Dios Es Amor Jesucristo Salva Y Sana 521 N. Washington 308-324-7960 L.D.S. Church 1407 W. 13th 308-324-6840

St. John’s Lutheran Church - ELCA 42646 Rd. 764 308-784-3063 or 308-324-5915 St. Peter’s In the Valley Episcopal 905 E. 13th 308-324-6199

Chapel of the Lake Services each Sunday 8:30 a.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day

Interdenominational featuring guest ministers and a variety of special music.

Located along Hwy. 283 on the southeast side of Johnson Lake For information on weddings, funerals, etc. from Mid-May to Late September, call 308-785-2287

15

Trinity Lutheran Church 205 E. 7th 308-324-4341 Islamic Center of Lexington 114A W. 5th., Lexington 612-735-7546 (cell) 308-764-2405 (cell) COZAD American Lutheran Church 200 E. 12th St. 308-784-3264 Christ the King Catholic Church 1220 M St. 308-784-3959 Church of Christ 22nd and Newell 308-784-2700

GOOD FAMILY DINING! GOOD FAMILY FUN! Wednesday Night Specials Starting at 6:00 p.m. 1st Wed. Spaghetti Night 2nd Wed. Taco Night 3rd Wed. Beer & Burger Night Last Wed. Prime Rib Night


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Fire protection is provided by a 44-member volunteer fire department, which also serves adjoining rural areas within the rural fire district and responds to mutual aid calls. The Gothenburg Volunteer Fire Department has over half of its members qualified as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and a 2-3 minute response time. Law enforcement The city employs six fulltime police officers. The recently remodeled department has two radio-equipped cars, breath analyzation and other standard equipment. The rural Gothenburg area is served by the Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, based in Lexington. A Nebraska State Patrol trooper also serves the Gothenburg area. Gothenburg education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the Superintendent’s office, 5373653. New students must have a current immunization record and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. Gothenburg has an elementary school, a junior high and a high school with a total enrollment of 900. School district No. 20 in Dawson County covers 121 square miles. The district is accredited by the State and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. A new junior/senior high school was dedicated in the spring of 2004. Vocational courses in the high school are family and consumer science, vocational agriculture, industrial technology, busi-

TIRE

2011 Dawson County 411

for a national market since 1953 and has 16 employees. Land O’Lakes, selling feed to a national market since 1974, has 10 full-time and three part-time employees. Frito Lay Inc., a corn storage, cleaning and shipping facility, opened in 1996 and employs 13 full-time, five management and four temporary personnel. Liquitech, LTD has produced liquid feed for a regional market since 1992 and employs five. Hicken Lumber Company provides local contractors with building supplies and equipment and employs five.

ness, auto cad and computer technology. Special education classes are provided to meet the needs for all students who are part of the public school system. A speech therapist and school psychologist are on staff. Adult education programs are conducted at the high school in conjunction with Central Community College and the UNK. Population

GROUP

Year Gothenburg Dawson Co. 1980 3,479 22,304 1990 3,232 19,940 2001 3,619 24,365 2006 3,746 25,018 Industrial Development MANUFACTURERS Baldwin Filters, producing air filters for motor vehicles for a national market since 1991, employs 150. Parker Tech Seal Division,

#1 in tires

Complete service on cars and light trucks Offering Good Year Tires Access to an Interpreter

since 1974 has made industrial seals for a national market, employing 70. All Points Cooperative, the result of a recent merger with All Points Cooperative in Lexington and with Farmland Service Coop in Gothenburg, now employs a combined total of 144 employees, 114 of which are full-time. The headquarters office is in Gothenburg. Gothenburg Feed Products, has provided alfalfa products

NON-MANUFACTURING Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District has 41 employees. City of Gothenburg employs 30 people. Monsanto Seed Research focuses on breeding and development of corn hybrids. It has 8 full-time, 2 part-time and 25 additional summer employees. Gothenburg Public Schools employ 102. Gothenburg Memorial Hospital employs 120. Hilltop Estates Nursing Home employs 59. Hoovestol Inc. is using Gothenburg as a relay station for its trucks hauling mail to locations around the United States. They have 35 drivers and eight mechanics. LEXINGTON Berean Bible Church

the courthouse and the jail, facing Washington Street. Troop D of the Nebraska State Patrol, headquartered in North Platte, maintains an office in Lexington. Troop D covers a 23-county area, including Dawson County and has 55 sworn officers and 12 carrier enforcement officers. Library The Lexington Public Library, 907 N. Washington, was built in 2005. The library offers a wide range of services from Lapsit Story Hour, book club, summer reading program, Nebraska Humanities programs throughout the year, Internet for public use, a copier, a fax machine, laminator, an AccuCut machine and dies. During tax season, free electronic filing is provided at the library for low- to moderate-income families that qualify. The library offers on-line databases, a 30,000 plus collection, which includes e-books, cake pans, area newspapers, audio books and videos. A dividable community room with kitchen and public restrooms are features at the new library, along with a children’s area, young adult area and fireplace reading area. Visit the library’s website, lexingtonlibrary.com, to see library policy, events, hours, browse the on-line card catalog and access the electronic

lizes digital carrier facilities for trucking to the Grand Island switching center for equal access to all companies. AT&T, Dial-Net, Sprint, MCI and LDDS Communications are network carriers currently serving this equal access community. Lexington Utilities Installation and maintenance perFor information on Lexington utilisonnel are located in Lexington. ties call 324-2343. For information about telephone Rural residents are served by service in Lexington, call Qwest, 1Dawson County Public Power District, a wholesale power customer 800-244-111; Spanish-speaking customers, 1-800-564-1121; and hearing of Nebraska Public Power District. impaired customers (TTY and voice), For rate information, call the DPPD 1-800-223-3131. office, 324-2386. Package Delivery Services Natural gas is supplied by SourceGas, Inc. through transmisPackage delivery services in sion pipelines. About 2,700 commerLexington are provided by Airborne cial and industrial customers are Express, Burlington Air Express, served by SourceGas. For informaCourier, Federal Express, Pony tion about gas service availability Express and United Parcel Service. and rates, call 1-800-563-0012. Lexington Industry LP gas is available for residential, The base industry in the Lexington commercial and industrial uses at All area is agriculture because of the Points Cooperative. Oil is available availability of natural resources: for residential, commercial and fertile soils, availability of high qualindustrial uses from All Points ity surface and ground water and a Cooperative and Davis Energy. growing season suitable for crop and Telephone Service livestock production. Qwest Communications provides Although the annual rainfall in the tele-communications services to the area is only 22 inches, high crop Lexington area. yields are possible because of surface The electronic switching office uti- irrigation from the Platte River to databases. The library also offers an ongoing used book sale. Library hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 324-2151.

Maintenance Free Living Apartments Available

Cozad Housing Authority 421 West 9th Street • Cozad, NE 69130 Call: 308-784-3661

Be prepared—you won’t have to scoop snow or mow the lawn. One check pays everything except phone and cable. Rent based on your individual adjusted income. Stop by our office 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Open during the noon hour or visit our website www.cozadhousingauthority.com. Ask about other rental programs that are available.

Offering a wide range of pharmaceutical services to meet your healthcare needs. We also carry a unique variety of: Candles & Home Fragrance • Gourmet Foods • Cards & Stationary Dinnerware • Gifts for Baby • Jewelry and Accessories Home and Garden Decor . . . and much more!

Serving Lexington and the surrounding communities for over 76 years.

Nebraskaland Tire 511 Plum Creek Parkway • Lexington, NE 68850 (308) 324-4604 Dave Giesbrecht, Manager

area fields, plus 3,400 irrigation wells providing water for crops. The Lexington area is a major player in livestock production, particularly cattle and hogs. More than 1 million cattle are finished in feedlots within a 50-mile radius of Lexington, 50,000 beef cows produce calves and over 100,000 hogs are produced in the area each year. Lexington is considered one of the top retail hubs in Nebraska for communities between 5,000 and 9,999, as named by the University of Nebraska, Agricultural Research Division. Most any product or service you could want can be found in Lexington, from major discount and department stores to many specialty shops. Whether you need to get a car serviced, or you’re looking for a night on the town, Lexington has something for everyone. Lexington is fortunate to have a downtown business district that is full of historical buildings and is home to many specialty shops. Also, Lexington has numerous businesses along Plum Creek Parkway. Non-manufacturing employers (20 or more) City of Lexington employs 71 in city government and services.

AUTHENTIC Only Authentic Italian Restaurant from Omaha to Denver

Check this out: • All Ground Level • Off Street Parking • Some Secured Entry Apartments • Appliances Furnished

600 N . Washington • Lexington • 308-324-4611

7

All dishes made fresh to order Only the finest Italian pastas served Fresh herbs used Carry-out available Wine & Beer Served 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday

Bella Italia

114 W. 7th • Cozad, Nebraska • 308-784-3100

J & L Sinclair Truck - Tire Repair - Towing 24-Hour Service Michelin • Bridgestone • Toyo Minor Truck Repair Service Truck Available

501 Hwy 30 • PO Box 323 Overton, NE 68863 • 308-987-2310


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ple, producing boxed beef and related products for a national and export market. Darling International, formerly Nebraska ByProducts, has produced meat scraps, tallow and hides for the local market since 1979. Orthman Manufacturing Co., established in 1960, has more than 115 employees, who build farm implements and grain carts for the national and export market. Designer Craft Woodworking, in business since 1985, has 22 employees and produces furniture for a national market. CRT Communications, in Lexington since 2007, has more than 50 employees and operates a call center for national telemarketing, specializing in insurance programs.

Dawson County employs 168 people in county government and services. Dawson County Public Power District, an electric utility, employs 82. Lexington Public Schools employ more than 300 people. Lexington Livestock Commission Co., a livestock market, has 49 employees. Plum Creek Medical Group P.C., a local medical clinic, has more than 40 employees. The State of Nebraska employs 31 people in the Lexington area. Industrial Development Manufacturers Eilers Machine and Welding Inc., established 1983, employs 65 people, who manufacture fabricated metal parts and also do local welding and machine repairs. Tyson Fresh Foods, established in Lexington in 1990, employs more than 2,500 peo-

Cozad Demography Cozad has the geographic distinction of being founded on the 100th Meridian. It lies in Dawson County in southcentral Nebraska, along U.S.

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1201 Plum Creek Parkway - Behind Little Caesars • 308-325-5560

ics Gothenburg has facilities for: Golf: Wild Horse Golf Club, an 18-hole links style course, opened to the public in April 1999. The course and clubhouse were constructed on a site in the Sand Hills overlooking the Platte River valley. It features huge greens and wide fairways bordered by native grass and about 60 bunkers. This course has been ranked nationally by Golfweek as the 25th Best Modern Course in 2006. It was also ranked No. 1 by Golf Magazine in 2007 as the Best Course Under $50. Swimming: Outdoor heated pool with water slide at the recreation complex. Tennis: Two lighted courts and one unlighted court. Fishing: Excellent fishing at interstate lakes, TriCounty lakes, Jeffrey Reservoir, Midway Lake, Johnson Reservoir and Lake Helen. Hunting: Pheasant, deer, grouse, squirrel, rabbit, quail, duck and geese. Skating: Ice-skating on lakes and ponds in winter. Bowling: One eight-lane bowling center. Boating: Canoeing at Lake Helen in city limits, boating at Midway Lake, 13 miles southeast; and Jeffrey Reservoir, 19 miles west. Theatre: Indoor theatre with 225 seats. Miniature Golf: An 18hole course features challenging holes in a relaxed setting by the Lake Helen Recreation Area. Horseshoes: Regulation pits are available for use at Lafayette Park. Events and celebrations The Pony Express Rodeo is held on July 3-4. Events include mutton busting for the youth. A barbecue and fireworks display add to the holiday festivities. The Annual Harvest Festival is held in September. It includes a parade, food in the park, ATV polo, games, plus many other activities. Activities and museums The Senior Center, 410 20th St., provides various activities including pool, snooker and cards and quilting and crafts. They also provide bus service for senior citizens

and meals on wheels for home-bound residents. Other community events include the Downtown Farmer’s Market held 4:30-6:30 p.m. every Thursday from July through September, the Munchkin Masquerade Parade in October, and the Tour of Homes and Holiday Magic in November or December. Gothenburg has many attractions including a selfguided tour of historic homes and downtown buildings. The Pony Express Station in Gothenburg’s Ehmen Park is a main attraction for over 27,000 tourists annually, with displays of souvenirs and artifacts. The Gothenburg Pony Express Historical Society was organized in 1980 with the purpose of gathering and preserving the history of Gothenburg to make it available to anyone interested in the area’s past. The Gothenburg Historical Museum, Located across the street from the Pony Express Station, at 15th and Avenue

13

and nuclear testing, mammography, ultra-sound and a number of laparoscopic type services. The Gothenburg Memorial Hospital has recently completed a $3 million expansion to the facility. Gothenburg utilities Dawson Public Power District serves the rural area surrounding Gothenburg. For more information about DPPD services, call 324-2386. Natural gas is supplied by SourceGas, through transmission pipelines. Call SourceGas at 1-800-563-0012. Residential water rates vary according to the size of pipe used to connect a home with city service. They range from $14.70/month for ¾-inch up to $21.65/month for twoinch service. Sewer rates are $28.75 per month for residential use. Solid waste is collected by private collection services within the city and transported to a new regional landfill north of Lexington. The monthly rate is $13.50. Electrical rates vary depending on the season. The residential customer charge per month is $6 in both summer and winter with the rate for the first 750 kwh at .068 in D, officially opened to the of Commerce was legally the summer and .0570 in winincorporated in 1940. public in June 2007 and welter. The balance charged is Volunteers each year carry comes visitors at no charge .068 in summer and .04 in the out various projects to beneMay through September, 1-4 winter. fit the community and prop.m. every Wednesday mote business and industrial through Saturday. Telephone service The Oregon Trail marker is growth. These volunteers QWEST provides telephone serve on the 20 committees located one mile south of services to the Gothenburg Gothenburg. Another attrac- and task forces that carry out area from a digital central annual projects such as the tion is the Swedish Crosses office. Installation and mainHarvest Festival, business Cemetery, located two miles tenance personnel are located and tourism promotion, legnorth and two miles west of in Gothenburg. Installation islative forums, ambassador the city. A Swedish blackand equal access services are smith made the three crosses services, membership drives, available. volunteer recognition events, for his grandchildren who Post Office business education seminars died in the 1880s. and so forth. The Gothenburg Post The award-winning Sod Gothenburg Health Care Office is located at 1021 Lake. house Museum was estabGothenburg has a fine hos- For more information call lished in Gothenburg in 1988 537-2121. Package delivery with a full-scale replica of an pital, five family practitionservices are also provided in ers, a general surgeon, three authentic sod house similar Gothenburg. to those used by early settlers physician’s assistants, two City Government dentists, optometrists, two of Central Nebraska, two Gothenburg, a city of the barbed wire sculptures and a chiropractors, three physical therapists, two wellness censecond class, has a mayorbarn with artifacts and souters and a fitness center. council form of government venirs. with a city administrator. Support services are providCultural activities include ed by consulting medical and The mayor is elected at the Pony Expressionists Art dental staff including oncolo- large and serves a four-year Club, Gothenburg gy, orthopedics, pathology, term. Four council members Community Playhouse, Sod radiology, ophthalmology, are elected by ward and each House Stitchers Quilt Guild, obstetrics, urology, pulserves a four-year term. The and the Community Concert Association, which serves the monology, oral surgery, cardi- city treasurer/clerk and city ology and orthodontia. administrator are appointed entire county. annually. A variety of diagnostic proThe Gothenburg Chamber cedures are available: stress Fire protection


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Gothenburg

Highway 30 and State Highway 47 intersect in the community. It is one-half-mile north of Interstate 80; 185 miles west of Lincoln, the State Capitol; 239 miles west of Omaha; and 301 miles east of Denver. Gothenburg is 2,557 feet above sea level. The terrain is generally flat with the sand hills beginning on the north edge of the community. The fertile Platte Valley borders the east, west and south edges of Gothenburg. Olof Bergstrom, a worker with the Union Pacific Railroad became the founding father for Gothenburg in the late 1800s. Bergstrom chose a farmstead north of the town site and traveled back to Sweden to convince his fellow countrymen to migrate to Nebraska to build a new town in the west. Along with the Swedes, many Germans and Danes settled in the area. By July of 1885, Gothenburg was incorporated as a town with a population of 300. The construction of a man-made lake designed to generate electricity encouraged several industries and factories to locate in Gothenburg in the 1890s. The money panic of 1893 quickly turned the boom to bust. Water designated for power was redirected to become an irrigation source for nearly 17,000 acres of farmland. Agriculture became Gothenburg’s economic mainstay. Industrial growth in the 1990s has added to the stability of Gothenburg’s already strong agricultural economy. Known as the “Pony Express Capital of Nebraska,” Gothenburg boasts two Pony Express stations. One is still located on its original site on the Lower 96 Ranch, four miles south of Gothenburg. Protected by a second roof, it retains its original form and became part of the ranch, which was built in 1897. The second station was located on the Upper 96 Ranch, 24 miles west of the Lower 96 Ranch. In 1931, Mrs. C.A. Williams, whose family owned the ranch, realized the station’s historic value and donated the building to the Gothenburg American Legion. Members dismantled it and rebuilt it in Gothenburg’s Ehmen Park. The building was dedicated in memory of the Pony Express riders and pioneers of the Old West on Oct. 2, 1931, at the Annual Harvest Festival celebration for the community.

Gothenburg’s first library, built in 1916 with assistance from a $7,000 Carnegie Foundation grant, is unique with its Jacobethan Revival architecture. In 1986 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A $1.4 million addition and renovation was completed and dedicated in 1999. Gothenburg residents take pride in their “can do” attitude. Past success stories include raising more than $8,000 in 1986 to buy playground equipment for the area around Lake Helen and raising $125,000 in just nine days in 1982 to match grant monies for construction of a new senior center. Volunteers also recognized the need to save the Sun Theater when it closed following 54 years of providing community entertainment. Purchased by the Community Playhouse with donations from clubs, organizations, businesses and individuals, the theater, operated by volunteers, is open every weekend with first-run movies and four live productions each year. Gothenburg’s active participation in the Nebraska Community Improvement Program has spanned more than 30 years. Over that time the community has netted well over 60 awards for its projects and the volunteers that have driven them. In 1991, the National Civic League named Gothenburg an All-America City. In 1993 Gothenburg helped Dawson County achieve AllAmerica City status. Dawson County is the only county in Nebraska to win this distinction. In 1995, the Nebraska Lied Main Street Program designated Gothenburg as a Main Street community to aid in preservation of the historic downtown business district. A downtown renovation project completed in 2000 included new sidewalks and lighting. Gothenburg has four parks covering 55 acres. Facilities include swings, picnic areas, pool, athletic fields, football stadium, 4-plex ball fields, camping areas and playground equipment. Three playgrounds in Gothenburg have a variety of playground equipment. Gothenburg has a summer recreation director and 15 employees. Weekly summer activities include baseball, T-ball, tennis, open swimming and softball. Special events during the summer are swimming lessons, scuba diving instruction, swim meet, lifesaving instruction, tennis tournaments and other clin-

Obstetrics Dr. John M. Ford

Pediatrics Dr. Joseph S. Miller

Geriatrics Family Practice

Dr. Mark Jones

Dr. Gregory M. Kloch

Dr. Pat Unterseher

Dr. Ed Ford

EUSTIS 106 E. RAILROAD • (308) 486-5440 Sidney Jaeger, P.A.C.

ELWOOD 202 SMITH AVE. • (308) 785-3385 Dr. Fran Acosta-Carlson

LEXINGTON 1103 BUFFALO BEND (308) 324-6386

Highway 30 and Nebraska Highway 21 and just under a mile north of Interstate 80. The community is located 247 miles west of Omaha and 317 miles east of Denver. Cozad Facts Cozad is a landmark in westward development. In the 1860s, railroads were racing to the 100th meridian, since the first to reach that point would win the right to build on toward California. The Union Pacific won that race and in the early 1870s, Ohio businessman John J. Cozad was traveling west on the Union Pacific when he saw the 100th meridian sign near what is present-day Cozad. He returned to his home in Ohio and organized a company of people to help him develop the town, which later was named after him. Almost immediately following settlement in 1873, the town was plagued with drought and grasshoppers. The community might have died, but the town’s founder paid settlers to build a bridge across the Platte River and to work on the brick hotel he was building in town. Cozad added a colorful chapter to the community’s history. In 1882 following a wage dispute and accusations that he had shot a man, Cozad and his family fled back East where they took on assumed names and severed all direct contact with the tiny town. In her book, “Son of a Gamblin’ Man,” published in 1960, Mari Sandoz revealed the mystery surrounding the disappearance of the Cozad family and identified the world-famous painter Robert Henri as John Cozad’s son. A hotel built by Cozad that was Henri’s childhood home, was sold to the Hendee family after the Cozads

Cozad

left. The Hendee Hotel now is more than 100 years old and has been renamed the “Robert Henri Museum and Historical Walkway” to commemorate Henri’s contribution to art. Henri is known for his “Ash Can” theory of painting. Topography The Platte Valley, in which Cozad is located, is fairly even terrain bordered on the south by the Platte River and on the north by the “Sand Hills.” The soil is deep-medium to mediumheavy texture of sedimentary and wind-blown deposits. Local economy Cozad’s major economic activities are farming, feeding and raising cattle; manufacturing, services and tourism. The city’s service sector includes a variety of restaurants, motels and retail stores. Cozad’s manufacturing base includes Tenneco (shock absorbers), Nebraska Plastics (vinyl manufacturing), Hunt Cleaners (industrial drycleaning and new safety products sales) Cozad Alfalfa and Island Dehy (alfalfa products). Manufacturers Cozad Alfalfa, Inc., established in 1960, produces alfalfa products for a national market, with 20 employees. Hunt Cleaners, recently rebuilt, has been a family-owned business since 1951. They are an industrial dry-cleaning and new safety sales industry with a national market. Island Dehy Company, founded in 1974, makes alfalfa products for a national and international market, and has 14 employees. Tenneco, employs 500 people, and since 1961 has produced auto and truck parts, including shock absorbers for the export market.

2011 Dawson County 411

Nebraska Plastics, Inc. established in 1945, employs 175 people and produces vinyl products for the national market. Paulsen, Inc., since 1946 has been involved in construction and pre-cast concrete products for a regional market. Paulsen Inc., employs 300 people. VVS, Inc., founded in 1961, provides industrial and commercial food service for a regional market, and employs 322 people. Major non-manufacturing employers (30 or more) City of Cozad has 38 employees. Cozad Community Health System has 108 employees. Cozad Public Schools employ 210 Golden Living Center employs 70 Cozad Parks & Recreation Cozad has eight parks covering 33 acres. Park facilities include a 50meter swimming pool; horseshoe pits; picnic area; cooking facilities; playground equipment; lighted tennis courts; restrooms; baseball diamonds; outdoor sand volleyball courts; a walking track; and overnight camping with electrical hookups, dump stations and water. Cozad has seven playgrounds that have tennis courts, basketball courts, Frisbee golf, ball diamonds, restrooms and standard playground equipment. The Cozad Parks and Recreation Department has 25 seasonal employees. Programs offered include youth baseball, softball, soccer and co-ed sand volleyball. For information about city recreation programs, call 784-5100. Cozad has facilities for: Golf: Cozad Country Club, a public 18-hole grass greens golf course with

9

clubhouse built in 1994, and new back nine opened in 2001, a mile east of town on Highway 30. Swimming: A 50-meter pool in Muni Park, 14th and Avenue O. Other highlights at Muni Park are baseball and soccer fields, Frisbee golf, horseshoe pits, walking trail, RV hookups, camping, sand volleyball, restrooms, sheltered picnic areas and a playground. Tennis: Four lighted courts and private indoor courts. Public tennis courts are at Centennial Park, 18th and H streets, and Sportsman’s Field, 19th and B streets. Racquetball and indoor tennis: Private courts are available through the Dawson County Racquet Club. For information, call David Cochrane, 308-325-5057. Fishing: Excellent fishing at Johnson Lake, southeast of town; Gallagher State Recreation Area, southeast of town; Midway Lake, southwest of town. Fishing also is superior at area sandpits, the Platte River, canals and reservoirs. Fishing licenses can be purchased at area retail outlets, bait and tackle shops and convenience stores. Hunting: Deer, quail, pheasant, ducks, geese, rabbit and grouse make Cozad and Dawson County popular hunting areas. Hunting licenses can be purchased at area retail outlets, bait and tackle shops and convenience stores. Skating: Natural ponds for iceskating. Bowling: 100th Meridian Bowl, 819 Avenue H, has eight lanes. Boating: Gallagher State Recreation Area, Midway Lake and Johnson Lake all are within 10 to 25 miles of Cozad. Events and Celebrations

Barb Foss, A.P.R.N.

THE INTERNET ACCESS SERVICE THAT’S FOCUSED ON

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www.atcjet.net 524 NEBRASKA AVE. • P.O. BOX 300 • ARAPAHOE, NE 68922 • 866-222-7873


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2011 Dawson County 411

Annual celebrations include the Robert Henri Birthday Celebration and Pony Express Reride at the Pony Express Station in Veteran’s Memorial Park in June, Bands, Brews and BBQs and the Triple B Car Show in July, Quilts Around the Block, the Farmer-Businessman Ag BBQ and Farm Family of the Year Award in August, Hay Days in September and Taste of Cozad, Holidays at the Henri and the Winter Wonderland Parade in December. For more information and the full slate of Cozad community celebrations, call the Cozad Chamber of Commerce at 784-3930. Activities and museums The Grand Generation Center, 410 W. Ninth Street, has been serving area seniors since 1988. The center serves noon meals Monday through Friday. Activities include crafts, card playing, dancing, bingo and other activities. The Robert Henri Museum and Historical Walkway opened in May 1986. Henri, the son of Cozad founder John J. Cozad, became a worldrenowned artist and the museum is

his childhood home. The walkway consists of an original Pony Express Station, the Little church in the Park and a pioneer schoolhouse. The Robert Henri Museum holds many art shows throughout the year. The Hendee Hotel, developed into a museum in 1983, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Another attraction is the 100th Meridian Museum, which was completed in 1994. The museum became the permanent home for the Cozad Touring Coach, which now can be viewed by the public. The famous touring coach carried President Taft during his visits to Yellowstone National Park. Cultural activities are provided by the World Entertainment Series, which presents three concerts per year. The Cozad Area Arts Council sponsors artists-in-residence, local singing groups and various plays and musical productions. Cozad population Year Cozad Dawson Co. 1930 1,813 17,875 1940 2,156 17,890

LEXINGTON ANIMAL CLINIC Medicine • Surgery • Grooming Dentistry • Boarding Dr. Joseph Vak 1301 W. Pacific Ave.

308-324-2411

1950 2,910 19,393 1960 3,184 19,405 1970 4,219 19,771 1980 4,453 22,304 1990 3,823 19,940 1993 4,022 22,531 2000 4,163 24,365 Cozad Education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the superintendent’s office, 784-2744.

New students must have a current immunization record and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. Cozad has an early education center, one elementary school, a middle school and high school. Construction was completed in January 2003 on the new middle school and grades 1-5 moved into their newly remodeled elementary building at 420 E. 14th St., formerly East Elementary. The Early Education Center at 420 W. 14th St.,

NELSONS FURNITURE Your Hometown Suppliers of Quality • Carpet • Floor Tile • Pictures

• Silk Floral Arrangements • Linoleum

• All Types of Home Furnishings • Mirrors

houses the special education preschool and all kindergarten students. Formerly North Elementary, it was extensively remodeled in 2002. Cozad Public Schools, also known as Dawson County School District No. 11, covers four square miles and has an enrollment of 1,036. Cozad schools are accredited by the State of Nebraska and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. Vocational courses are offered in the high school, including marketing, metals, construction, housing, clothing and parenting. Facilities for special education are located within the regular educational facilities and are designed for level 1 and level 2 handicapped students. Severe and profoundly handicapped students are also educated in Cozad through its multiple handicapped program. Special schools The Cozad Alternative School is housed in the Cozad Center at 1910 Meridian in Cozad. It is a program designed to meet the unique needs of a specific group of students who have the potential, but may not be experiencing success in a tradition school setting. The school offers a component in its curriculum providing “workbased learning.” This allows high school students to have a part-time job while attending the school halfdays and the middle schools are exposed to community service. The building is owned by the City of Cozad and leased to the ESU. Resource materials of all types are housed at the center and certain testing services are offered. Also housed at the center is Cozad’s Head Start Program. The center’s phone number is 784-4525. South Central Developmental Services, 821 J Street, is a private, non-profit corporation providing residential, social, vocational and recreational services for people with men-

eral oil companies and service stations in Cozad. Water and Sewer The residential sewer rate in Cozad is $29 per month. Call the City of Cozad, 784-2090.

tal retardation. South Central Developmental Services, governed by a local board of directors, is part of a statewide system of communitybased mental retardation programs. The state is divided into six regions, with South Central located in Region II. The agency’s phone number is 784-4222. Cozad utilities The City of Cozad operates a municipal electrical distribution system with power supplied by the Nebraska Public Power District. An electrical deposit is required for new residential electrical customers. For information, call 7842090. Solid Waste Disposal Residential trash pickup is operated by the city, along with a recycling program. Natural Gas and Other Fuels Natural gas is supplied by KinderMorgan, Inc. For information about

Providing Assisted Living Units, Long-term Care & Adult Day Care

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WEL-Life at Plum Creek & Plum Creek Care Center

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We Accept

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11

Lantis Enterprises

We’re here to help! 1505 N. Adams St. • Lexington, NE 68850 • 308-324-5531

Telephone service Telecommunications services are provided by Cozad Telephone Company, which is locally owned and operated. Cozad Telephone Company has a digital central office and has deployed a fiber optic network throughout the entire service area. This allows every customers access to all the latest telephone features and high speed Internet. For more information about telecommunication services in Cozad, visit www.cozadtel.net or call the Cozad Telephone Company, 308-784-4044. Post Office The Cozad Post Office is located at 102 E. Ninth, 784-3400. gas service availability and rates, call Package delivery services in Cozad KM at 1-800-563-0012. are provided by United Parcel Service, Federal Express, Airborne LP gas is available for residential, Express, Pony Express, Emery, commercial and industrial uses at Cozad Oil and Propane and Farmland Purolator and the U.S. Postal Service. Service Coop. Gothenburg Demography Oil is available for residential, comGothenburg is located in south-cenmercial and industrial uses from sev- tral Nebraska in Dawson County. U.S.

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LEXINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY’S

EASTLAWN APARTMENTS Maintenance FREE Apartment Living

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APPLICAT IONS ARE BEIN G ACCEPT ED For The LEXINGTO N HOUSIN G AUTHORIT Y’S

Scattered S ite Rental H omes And Voucher R ental Assis tance To Private Landlords Stop in to p ick up an a pplication or call to m ake an app ointment at 324-4633.

• Private Ground Level Entrances We have re ntal assista • Laundry Facilities On Site programs fo nce r the elderl • Potluck Dinner, Movies, Cards h y, disabled, andicapped and income and Special Activities! eligible families and • Utilities Are Included singles. In Your Rent • Rent Based On Your Income • Two Community Rooms Available for Tenants’ Use Stop In and Pick Up An Application Today or CALL 308-324-4633 to receive an application in the mail.

Visit with one of the friendly folks at Eastlawn Apartments today and find out how you can really begin enjoying carefree living!

LEXINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 609 East Third Street • Lexington, NE 68850 • 308-324-4633; TDD 324-6619


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2011 Dawson County 411

Annual celebrations include the Robert Henri Birthday Celebration and Pony Express Reride at the Pony Express Station in Veteran’s Memorial Park in June, Bands, Brews and BBQs and the Triple B Car Show in July, Quilts Around the Block, the Farmer-Businessman Ag BBQ and Farm Family of the Year Award in August, Hay Days in September and Taste of Cozad, Holidays at the Henri and the Winter Wonderland Parade in December. For more information and the full slate of Cozad community celebrations, call the Cozad Chamber of Commerce at 784-3930. Activities and museums The Grand Generation Center, 410 W. Ninth Street, has been serving area seniors since 1988. The center serves noon meals Monday through Friday. Activities include crafts, card playing, dancing, bingo and other activities. The Robert Henri Museum and Historical Walkway opened in May 1986. Henri, the son of Cozad founder John J. Cozad, became a worldrenowned artist and the museum is

his childhood home. The walkway consists of an original Pony Express Station, the Little church in the Park and a pioneer schoolhouse. The Robert Henri Museum holds many art shows throughout the year. The Hendee Hotel, developed into a museum in 1983, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Another attraction is the 100th Meridian Museum, which was completed in 1994. The museum became the permanent home for the Cozad Touring Coach, which now can be viewed by the public. The famous touring coach carried President Taft during his visits to Yellowstone National Park. Cultural activities are provided by the World Entertainment Series, which presents three concerts per year. The Cozad Area Arts Council sponsors artists-in-residence, local singing groups and various plays and musical productions. Cozad population Year Cozad Dawson Co. 1930 1,813 17,875 1940 2,156 17,890

LEXINGTON ANIMAL CLINIC Medicine • Surgery • Grooming Dentistry • Boarding Dr. Joseph Vak 1301 W. Pacific Ave.

308-324-2411

1950 2,910 19,393 1960 3,184 19,405 1970 4,219 19,771 1980 4,453 22,304 1990 3,823 19,940 1993 4,022 22,531 2000 4,163 24,365 Cozad Education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the superintendent’s office, 784-2744.

New students must have a current immunization record and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. Cozad has an early education center, one elementary school, a middle school and high school. Construction was completed in January 2003 on the new middle school and grades 1-5 moved into their newly remodeled elementary building at 420 E. 14th St., formerly East Elementary. The Early Education Center at 420 W. 14th St.,

NELSONS FURNITURE Your Hometown Suppliers of Quality • Carpet • Floor Tile • Pictures

• Silk Floral Arrangements • Linoleum

• All Types of Home Furnishings • Mirrors

houses the special education preschool and all kindergarten students. Formerly North Elementary, it was extensively remodeled in 2002. Cozad Public Schools, also known as Dawson County School District No. 11, covers four square miles and has an enrollment of 1,036. Cozad schools are accredited by the State of Nebraska and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. Vocational courses are offered in the high school, including marketing, metals, construction, housing, clothing and parenting. Facilities for special education are located within the regular educational facilities and are designed for level 1 and level 2 handicapped students. Severe and profoundly handicapped students are also educated in Cozad through its multiple handicapped program. Special schools The Cozad Alternative School is housed in the Cozad Center at 1910 Meridian in Cozad. It is a program designed to meet the unique needs of a specific group of students who have the potential, but may not be experiencing success in a tradition school setting. The school offers a component in its curriculum providing “workbased learning.” This allows high school students to have a part-time job while attending the school halfdays and the middle schools are exposed to community service. The building is owned by the City of Cozad and leased to the ESU. Resource materials of all types are housed at the center and certain testing services are offered. Also housed at the center is Cozad’s Head Start Program. The center’s phone number is 784-4525. South Central Developmental Services, 821 J Street, is a private, non-profit corporation providing residential, social, vocational and recreational services for people with men-

eral oil companies and service stations in Cozad. Water and Sewer The residential sewer rate in Cozad is $29 per month. Call the City of Cozad, 784-2090.

tal retardation. South Central Developmental Services, governed by a local board of directors, is part of a statewide system of communitybased mental retardation programs. The state is divided into six regions, with South Central located in Region II. The agency’s phone number is 784-4222. Cozad utilities The City of Cozad operates a municipal electrical distribution system with power supplied by the Nebraska Public Power District. An electrical deposit is required for new residential electrical customers. For information, call 7842090. Solid Waste Disposal Residential trash pickup is operated by the city, along with a recycling program. Natural Gas and Other Fuels Natural gas is supplied by KinderMorgan, Inc. For information about

Providing Assisted Living Units, Long-term Care & Adult Day Care

Big City Spice, Small Town Nice, One Low Price

“Working With The Community To Meet All Needs!”

508 N. Washington - Lexington - 308-324-6406 2109 Central Ave. - Kearney - 308-236-5031 2921 W. Hwy 30 - Grand Island - 308-382-0101 742 W. 2nd - Hastings - 402-463-2465

WEL-Life at Plum Creek & Plum Creek Care Center

se habla español

We Accept

6 Months Free Financing W.A.C. Available Let Us Help Make Your House a Home

11

Lantis Enterprises

We’re here to help! 1505 N. Adams St. • Lexington, NE 68850 • 308-324-5531

Telephone service Telecommunications services are provided by Cozad Telephone Company, which is locally owned and operated. Cozad Telephone Company has a digital central office and has deployed a fiber optic network throughout the entire service area. This allows every customers access to all the latest telephone features and high speed Internet. For more information about telecommunication services in Cozad, visit www.cozadtel.net or call the Cozad Telephone Company, 308-784-4044. Post Office The Cozad Post Office is located at 102 E. Ninth, 784-3400. gas service availability and rates, call Package delivery services in Cozad KM at 1-800-563-0012. are provided by United Parcel Service, Federal Express, Airborne LP gas is available for residential, Express, Pony Express, Emery, commercial and industrial uses at Cozad Oil and Propane and Farmland Purolator and the U.S. Postal Service. Service Coop. Gothenburg Demography Oil is available for residential, comGothenburg is located in south-cenmercial and industrial uses from sev- tral Nebraska in Dawson County. U.S.

Is it time for you to relax not worry about yard work, scooping snow or maintenance? Then you need to call

LEXINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY’S

EASTLAWN APARTMENTS Maintenance FREE Apartment Living

Eastlawn Apartments Offer:

APPLICAT IONS ARE BEIN G ACCEPT ED For The LEXINGTO N HOUSIN G AUTHORIT Y’S

Scattered S ite Rental H omes And Voucher R ental Assis tance To Private Landlords Stop in to p ick up an a pplication or call to m ake an app ointment at 324-4633.

• Private Ground Level Entrances We have re ntal assista • Laundry Facilities On Site programs fo nce r the elderl • Potluck Dinner, Movies, Cards h y, disabled, andicapped and income and Special Activities! eligible families and • Utilities Are Included singles. In Your Rent • Rent Based On Your Income • Two Community Rooms Available for Tenants’ Use Stop In and Pick Up An Application Today or CALL 308-324-4633 to receive an application in the mail.

Visit with one of the friendly folks at Eastlawn Apartments today and find out how you can really begin enjoying carefree living!

LEXINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 609 East Third Street • Lexington, NE 68850 • 308-324-4633; TDD 324-6619


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2011 Dawson County 411

Gothenburg

Highway 30 and State Highway 47 intersect in the community. It is one-half-mile north of Interstate 80; 185 miles west of Lincoln, the State Capitol; 239 miles west of Omaha; and 301 miles east of Denver. Gothenburg is 2,557 feet above sea level. The terrain is generally flat with the sand hills beginning on the north edge of the community. The fertile Platte Valley borders the east, west and south edges of Gothenburg. Olof Bergstrom, a worker with the Union Pacific Railroad became the founding father for Gothenburg in the late 1800s. Bergstrom chose a farmstead north of the town site and traveled back to Sweden to convince his fellow countrymen to migrate to Nebraska to build a new town in the west. Along with the Swedes, many Germans and Danes settled in the area. By July of 1885, Gothenburg was incorporated as a town with a population of 300. The construction of a man-made lake designed to generate electricity encouraged several industries and factories to locate in Gothenburg in the 1890s. The money panic of 1893 quickly turned the boom to bust. Water designated for power was redirected to become an irrigation source for nearly 17,000 acres of farmland. Agriculture became Gothenburg’s economic mainstay. Industrial growth in the 1990s has added to the stability of Gothenburg’s already strong agricultural economy. Known as the “Pony Express Capital of Nebraska,” Gothenburg boasts two Pony Express stations. One is still located on its original site on the Lower 96 Ranch, four miles south of Gothenburg. Protected by a second roof, it retains its original form and became part of the ranch, which was built in 1897. The second station was located on the Upper 96 Ranch, 24 miles west of the Lower 96 Ranch. In 1931, Mrs. C.A. Williams, whose family owned the ranch, realized the station’s historic value and donated the building to the Gothenburg American Legion. Members dismantled it and rebuilt it in Gothenburg’s Ehmen Park. The building was dedicated in memory of the Pony Express riders and pioneers of the Old West on Oct. 2, 1931, at the Annual Harvest Festival celebration for the community.

Gothenburg’s first library, built in 1916 with assistance from a $7,000 Carnegie Foundation grant, is unique with its Jacobethan Revival architecture. In 1986 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A $1.4 million addition and renovation was completed and dedicated in 1999. Gothenburg residents take pride in their “can do” attitude. Past success stories include raising more than $8,000 in 1986 to buy playground equipment for the area around Lake Helen and raising $125,000 in just nine days in 1982 to match grant monies for construction of a new senior center. Volunteers also recognized the need to save the Sun Theater when it closed following 54 years of providing community entertainment. Purchased by the Community Playhouse with donations from clubs, organizations, businesses and individuals, the theater, operated by volunteers, is open every weekend with first-run movies and four live productions each year. Gothenburg’s active participation in the Nebraska Community Improvement Program has spanned more than 30 years. Over that time the community has netted well over 60 awards for its projects and the volunteers that have driven them. In 1991, the National Civic League named Gothenburg an All-America City. In 1993 Gothenburg helped Dawson County achieve AllAmerica City status. Dawson County is the only county in Nebraska to win this distinction. In 1995, the Nebraska Lied Main Street Program designated Gothenburg as a Main Street community to aid in preservation of the historic downtown business district. A downtown renovation project completed in 2000 included new sidewalks and lighting. Gothenburg has four parks covering 55 acres. Facilities include swings, picnic areas, pool, athletic fields, football stadium, 4-plex ball fields, camping areas and playground equipment. Three playgrounds in Gothenburg have a variety of playground equipment. Gothenburg has a summer recreation director and 15 employees. Weekly summer activities include baseball, T-ball, tennis, open swimming and softball. Special events during the summer are swimming lessons, scuba diving instruction, swim meet, lifesaving instruction, tennis tournaments and other clin-

Obstetrics Dr. John M. Ford

Pediatrics Dr. Joseph S. Miller

Geriatrics Family Practice

Dr. Mark Jones

Dr. Gregory M. Kloch

Dr. Pat Unterseher

Dr. Ed Ford

EUSTIS 106 E. RAILROAD • (308) 486-5440 Sidney Jaeger, P.A.C.

ELWOOD 202 SMITH AVE. • (308) 785-3385 Dr. Fran Acosta-Carlson

LEXINGTON 1103 BUFFALO BEND (308) 324-6386

Highway 30 and Nebraska Highway 21 and just under a mile north of Interstate 80. The community is located 247 miles west of Omaha and 317 miles east of Denver. Cozad Facts Cozad is a landmark in westward development. In the 1860s, railroads were racing to the 100th meridian, since the first to reach that point would win the right to build on toward California. The Union Pacific won that race and in the early 1870s, Ohio businessman John J. Cozad was traveling west on the Union Pacific when he saw the 100th meridian sign near what is present-day Cozad. He returned to his home in Ohio and organized a company of people to help him develop the town, which later was named after him. Almost immediately following settlement in 1873, the town was plagued with drought and grasshoppers. The community might have died, but the town’s founder paid settlers to build a bridge across the Platte River and to work on the brick hotel he was building in town. Cozad added a colorful chapter to the community’s history. In 1882 following a wage dispute and accusations that he had shot a man, Cozad and his family fled back East where they took on assumed names and severed all direct contact with the tiny town. In her book, “Son of a Gamblin’ Man,” published in 1960, Mari Sandoz revealed the mystery surrounding the disappearance of the Cozad family and identified the world-famous painter Robert Henri as John Cozad’s son. A hotel built by Cozad that was Henri’s childhood home, was sold to the Hendee family after the Cozads

Cozad

left. The Hendee Hotel now is more than 100 years old and has been renamed the “Robert Henri Museum and Historical Walkway” to commemorate Henri’s contribution to art. Henri is known for his “Ash Can” theory of painting. Topography The Platte Valley, in which Cozad is located, is fairly even terrain bordered on the south by the Platte River and on the north by the “Sand Hills.” The soil is deep-medium to mediumheavy texture of sedimentary and wind-blown deposits. Local economy Cozad’s major economic activities are farming, feeding and raising cattle; manufacturing, services and tourism. The city’s service sector includes a variety of restaurants, motels and retail stores. Cozad’s manufacturing base includes Tenneco (shock absorbers), Nebraska Plastics (vinyl manufacturing), Hunt Cleaners (industrial drycleaning and new safety products sales) Cozad Alfalfa and Island Dehy (alfalfa products). Manufacturers Cozad Alfalfa, Inc., established in 1960, produces alfalfa products for a national market, with 20 employees. Hunt Cleaners, recently rebuilt, has been a family-owned business since 1951. They are an industrial dry-cleaning and new safety sales industry with a national market. Island Dehy Company, founded in 1974, makes alfalfa products for a national and international market, and has 14 employees. Tenneco, employs 500 people, and since 1961 has produced auto and truck parts, including shock absorbers for the export market.

2011 Dawson County 411

Nebraska Plastics, Inc. established in 1945, employs 175 people and produces vinyl products for the national market. Paulsen, Inc., since 1946 has been involved in construction and pre-cast concrete products for a regional market. Paulsen Inc., employs 300 people. VVS, Inc., founded in 1961, provides industrial and commercial food service for a regional market, and employs 322 people. Major non-manufacturing employers (30 or more) City of Cozad has 38 employees. Cozad Community Health System has 108 employees. Cozad Public Schools employ 210 Golden Living Center employs 70 Cozad Parks & Recreation Cozad has eight parks covering 33 acres. Park facilities include a 50meter swimming pool; horseshoe pits; picnic area; cooking facilities; playground equipment; lighted tennis courts; restrooms; baseball diamonds; outdoor sand volleyball courts; a walking track; and overnight camping with electrical hookups, dump stations and water. Cozad has seven playgrounds that have tennis courts, basketball courts, Frisbee golf, ball diamonds, restrooms and standard playground equipment. The Cozad Parks and Recreation Department has 25 seasonal employees. Programs offered include youth baseball, softball, soccer and co-ed sand volleyball. For information about city recreation programs, call 784-5100. Cozad has facilities for: Golf: Cozad Country Club, a public 18-hole grass greens golf course with

9

clubhouse built in 1994, and new back nine opened in 2001, a mile east of town on Highway 30. Swimming: A 50-meter pool in Muni Park, 14th and Avenue O. Other highlights at Muni Park are baseball and soccer fields, Frisbee golf, horseshoe pits, walking trail, RV hookups, camping, sand volleyball, restrooms, sheltered picnic areas and a playground. Tennis: Four lighted courts and private indoor courts. Public tennis courts are at Centennial Park, 18th and H streets, and Sportsman’s Field, 19th and B streets. Racquetball and indoor tennis: Private courts are available through the Dawson County Racquet Club. For information, call David Cochrane, 308-325-5057. Fishing: Excellent fishing at Johnson Lake, southeast of town; Gallagher State Recreation Area, southeast of town; Midway Lake, southwest of town. Fishing also is superior at area sandpits, the Platte River, canals and reservoirs. Fishing licenses can be purchased at area retail outlets, bait and tackle shops and convenience stores. Hunting: Deer, quail, pheasant, ducks, geese, rabbit and grouse make Cozad and Dawson County popular hunting areas. Hunting licenses can be purchased at area retail outlets, bait and tackle shops and convenience stores. Skating: Natural ponds for iceskating. Bowling: 100th Meridian Bowl, 819 Avenue H, has eight lanes. Boating: Gallagher State Recreation Area, Midway Lake and Johnson Lake all are within 10 to 25 miles of Cozad. Events and Celebrations

Barb Foss, A.P.R.N.

THE INTERNET ACCESS SERVICE THAT’S FOCUSED ON

SPEED!

Ann Young, A.P.R.N.

Admissions 24/7 • Tours Available • Call Shawna

308-784-3715 318 W. 18th • Cozad

ATC COMMUNICATIONS HI-SPEED BROADBAND WIRELESS SERVICE DIAL -UP INTERNET SERVICE

www.atcjet.net 524 NEBRASKA AVE. • P.O. BOX 300 • ARAPAHOE, NE 68922 • 866-222-7873


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2011 Dawson County 411

2011 Dawson County 411

ple, producing boxed beef and related products for a national and export market. Darling International, formerly Nebraska ByProducts, has produced meat scraps, tallow and hides for the local market since 1979. Orthman Manufacturing Co., established in 1960, has more than 115 employees, who build farm implements and grain carts for the national and export market. Designer Craft Woodworking, in business since 1985, has 22 employees and produces furniture for a national market. CRT Communications, in Lexington since 2007, has more than 50 employees and operates a call center for national telemarketing, specializing in insurance programs.

Dawson County employs 168 people in county government and services. Dawson County Public Power District, an electric utility, employs 82. Lexington Public Schools employ more than 300 people. Lexington Livestock Commission Co., a livestock market, has 49 employees. Plum Creek Medical Group P.C., a local medical clinic, has more than 40 employees. The State of Nebraska employs 31 people in the Lexington area. Industrial Development Manufacturers Eilers Machine and Welding Inc., established 1983, employs 65 people, who manufacture fabricated metal parts and also do local welding and machine repairs. Tyson Fresh Foods, established in Lexington in 1990, employs more than 2,500 peo-

Cozad Demography Cozad has the geographic distinction of being founded on the 100th Meridian. It lies in Dawson County in southcentral Nebraska, along U.S.

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ics Gothenburg has facilities for: Golf: Wild Horse Golf Club, an 18-hole links style course, opened to the public in April 1999. The course and clubhouse were constructed on a site in the Sand Hills overlooking the Platte River valley. It features huge greens and wide fairways bordered by native grass and about 60 bunkers. This course has been ranked nationally by Golfweek as the 25th Best Modern Course in 2006. It was also ranked No. 1 by Golf Magazine in 2007 as the Best Course Under $50. Swimming: Outdoor heated pool with water slide at the recreation complex. Tennis: Two lighted courts and one unlighted court. Fishing: Excellent fishing at interstate lakes, TriCounty lakes, Jeffrey Reservoir, Midway Lake, Johnson Reservoir and Lake Helen. Hunting: Pheasant, deer, grouse, squirrel, rabbit, quail, duck and geese. Skating: Ice-skating on lakes and ponds in winter. Bowling: One eight-lane bowling center. Boating: Canoeing at Lake Helen in city limits, boating at Midway Lake, 13 miles southeast; and Jeffrey Reservoir, 19 miles west. Theatre: Indoor theatre with 225 seats. Miniature Golf: An 18hole course features challenging holes in a relaxed setting by the Lake Helen Recreation Area. Horseshoes: Regulation pits are available for use at Lafayette Park. Events and celebrations The Pony Express Rodeo is held on July 3-4. Events include mutton busting for the youth. A barbecue and fireworks display add to the holiday festivities. The Annual Harvest Festival is held in September. It includes a parade, food in the park, ATV polo, games, plus many other activities. Activities and museums The Senior Center, 410 20th St., provides various activities including pool, snooker and cards and quilting and crafts. They also provide bus service for senior citizens

and meals on wheels for home-bound residents. Other community events include the Downtown Farmer’s Market held 4:30-6:30 p.m. every Thursday from July through September, the Munchkin Masquerade Parade in October, and the Tour of Homes and Holiday Magic in November or December. Gothenburg has many attractions including a selfguided tour of historic homes and downtown buildings. The Pony Express Station in Gothenburg’s Ehmen Park is a main attraction for over 27,000 tourists annually, with displays of souvenirs and artifacts. The Gothenburg Pony Express Historical Society was organized in 1980 with the purpose of gathering and preserving the history of Gothenburg to make it available to anyone interested in the area’s past. The Gothenburg Historical Museum, Located across the street from the Pony Express Station, at 15th and Avenue

13

and nuclear testing, mammography, ultra-sound and a number of laparoscopic type services. The Gothenburg Memorial Hospital has recently completed a $3 million expansion to the facility. Gothenburg utilities Dawson Public Power District serves the rural area surrounding Gothenburg. For more information about DPPD services, call 324-2386. Natural gas is supplied by SourceGas, through transmission pipelines. Call SourceGas at 1-800-563-0012. Residential water rates vary according to the size of pipe used to connect a home with city service. They range from $14.70/month for ¾-inch up to $21.65/month for twoinch service. Sewer rates are $28.75 per month for residential use. Solid waste is collected by private collection services within the city and transported to a new regional landfill north of Lexington. The monthly rate is $13.50. Electrical rates vary depending on the season. The residential customer charge per month is $6 in both summer and winter with the rate for the first 750 kwh at .068 in D, officially opened to the of Commerce was legally the summer and .0570 in winincorporated in 1940. public in June 2007 and welter. The balance charged is Volunteers each year carry comes visitors at no charge .068 in summer and .04 in the out various projects to beneMay through September, 1-4 winter. fit the community and prop.m. every Wednesday mote business and industrial through Saturday. Telephone service The Oregon Trail marker is growth. These volunteers QWEST provides telephone serve on the 20 committees located one mile south of services to the Gothenburg Gothenburg. Another attrac- and task forces that carry out area from a digital central annual projects such as the tion is the Swedish Crosses office. Installation and mainHarvest Festival, business Cemetery, located two miles tenance personnel are located and tourism promotion, legnorth and two miles west of in Gothenburg. Installation islative forums, ambassador the city. A Swedish blackand equal access services are smith made the three crosses services, membership drives, available. volunteer recognition events, for his grandchildren who Post Office business education seminars died in the 1880s. and so forth. The Gothenburg Post The award-winning Sod Gothenburg Health Care Office is located at 1021 Lake. house Museum was estabGothenburg has a fine hos- For more information call lished in Gothenburg in 1988 537-2121. Package delivery with a full-scale replica of an pital, five family practitionservices are also provided in ers, a general surgeon, three authentic sod house similar Gothenburg. to those used by early settlers physician’s assistants, two City Government dentists, optometrists, two of Central Nebraska, two Gothenburg, a city of the barbed wire sculptures and a chiropractors, three physical therapists, two wellness censecond class, has a mayorbarn with artifacts and souters and a fitness center. council form of government venirs. with a city administrator. Support services are providCultural activities include ed by consulting medical and The mayor is elected at the Pony Expressionists Art dental staff including oncolo- large and serves a four-year Club, Gothenburg gy, orthopedics, pathology, term. Four council members Community Playhouse, Sod radiology, ophthalmology, are elected by ward and each House Stitchers Quilt Guild, obstetrics, urology, pulserves a four-year term. The and the Community Concert Association, which serves the monology, oral surgery, cardi- city treasurer/clerk and city ology and orthodontia. administrator are appointed entire county. annually. A variety of diagnostic proThe Gothenburg Chamber cedures are available: stress Fire protection


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Fire protection is provided by a 44-member volunteer fire department, which also serves adjoining rural areas within the rural fire district and responds to mutual aid calls. The Gothenburg Volunteer Fire Department has over half of its members qualified as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and a 2-3 minute response time. Law enforcement The city employs six fulltime police officers. The recently remodeled department has two radio-equipped cars, breath analyzation and other standard equipment. The rural Gothenburg area is served by the Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, based in Lexington. A Nebraska State Patrol trooper also serves the Gothenburg area. Gothenburg education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the Superintendent’s office, 5373653. New students must have a current immunization record and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. Gothenburg has an elementary school, a junior high and a high school with a total enrollment of 900. School district No. 20 in Dawson County covers 121 square miles. The district is accredited by the State and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. A new junior/senior high school was dedicated in the spring of 2004. Vocational courses in the high school are family and consumer science, vocational agriculture, industrial technology, busi-

TIRE

2011 Dawson County 411

for a national market since 1953 and has 16 employees. Land O’Lakes, selling feed to a national market since 1974, has 10 full-time and three part-time employees. Frito Lay Inc., a corn storage, cleaning and shipping facility, opened in 1996 and employs 13 full-time, five management and four temporary personnel. Liquitech, LTD has produced liquid feed for a regional market since 1992 and employs five. Hicken Lumber Company provides local contractors with building supplies and equipment and employs five.

ness, auto cad and computer technology. Special education classes are provided to meet the needs for all students who are part of the public school system. A speech therapist and school psychologist are on staff. Adult education programs are conducted at the high school in conjunction with Central Community College and the UNK. Population

GROUP

Year Gothenburg Dawson Co. 1980 3,479 22,304 1990 3,232 19,940 2001 3,619 24,365 2006 3,746 25,018 Industrial Development MANUFACTURERS Baldwin Filters, producing air filters for motor vehicles for a national market since 1991, employs 150. Parker Tech Seal Division,

#1 in tires

Complete service on cars and light trucks Offering Good Year Tires Access to an Interpreter

since 1974 has made industrial seals for a national market, employing 70. All Points Cooperative, the result of a recent merger with All Points Cooperative in Lexington and with Farmland Service Coop in Gothenburg, now employs a combined total of 144 employees, 114 of which are full-time. The headquarters office is in Gothenburg. Gothenburg Feed Products, has provided alfalfa products

NON-MANUFACTURING Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District has 41 employees. City of Gothenburg employs 30 people. Monsanto Seed Research focuses on breeding and development of corn hybrids. It has 8 full-time, 2 part-time and 25 additional summer employees. Gothenburg Public Schools employ 102. Gothenburg Memorial Hospital employs 120. Hilltop Estates Nursing Home employs 59. Hoovestol Inc. is using Gothenburg as a relay station for its trucks hauling mail to locations around the United States. They have 35 drivers and eight mechanics. LEXINGTON Berean Bible Church

the courthouse and the jail, facing Washington Street. Troop D of the Nebraska State Patrol, headquartered in North Platte, maintains an office in Lexington. Troop D covers a 23-county area, including Dawson County and has 55 sworn officers and 12 carrier enforcement officers. Library The Lexington Public Library, 907 N. Washington, was built in 2005. The library offers a wide range of services from Lapsit Story Hour, book club, summer reading program, Nebraska Humanities programs throughout the year, Internet for public use, a copier, a fax machine, laminator, an AccuCut machine and dies. During tax season, free electronic filing is provided at the library for low- to moderate-income families that qualify. The library offers on-line databases, a 30,000 plus collection, which includes e-books, cake pans, area newspapers, audio books and videos. A dividable community room with kitchen and public restrooms are features at the new library, along with a children’s area, young adult area and fireplace reading area. Visit the library’s website, lexingtonlibrary.com, to see library policy, events, hours, browse the on-line card catalog and access the electronic

lizes digital carrier facilities for trucking to the Grand Island switching center for equal access to all companies. AT&T, Dial-Net, Sprint, MCI and LDDS Communications are network carriers currently serving this equal access community. Lexington Utilities Installation and maintenance perFor information on Lexington utilisonnel are located in Lexington. ties call 324-2343. For information about telephone Rural residents are served by service in Lexington, call Qwest, 1Dawson County Public Power District, a wholesale power customer 800-244-111; Spanish-speaking customers, 1-800-564-1121; and hearing of Nebraska Public Power District. impaired customers (TTY and voice), For rate information, call the DPPD 1-800-223-3131. office, 324-2386. Package Delivery Services Natural gas is supplied by SourceGas, Inc. through transmisPackage delivery services in sion pipelines. About 2,700 commerLexington are provided by Airborne cial and industrial customers are Express, Burlington Air Express, served by SourceGas. For informaCourier, Federal Express, Pony tion about gas service availability Express and United Parcel Service. and rates, call 1-800-563-0012. Lexington Industry LP gas is available for residential, The base industry in the Lexington commercial and industrial uses at All area is agriculture because of the Points Cooperative. Oil is available availability of natural resources: for residential, commercial and fertile soils, availability of high qualindustrial uses from All Points ity surface and ground water and a Cooperative and Davis Energy. growing season suitable for crop and Telephone Service livestock production. Qwest Communications provides Although the annual rainfall in the tele-communications services to the area is only 22 inches, high crop Lexington area. yields are possible because of surface The electronic switching office uti- irrigation from the Platte River to databases. The library also offers an ongoing used book sale. Library hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 324-2151.

Maintenance Free Living Apartments Available

Cozad Housing Authority 421 West 9th Street • Cozad, NE 69130 Call: 308-784-3661

Be prepared—you won’t have to scoop snow or mow the lawn. One check pays everything except phone and cable. Rent based on your individual adjusted income. Stop by our office 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Open during the noon hour or visit our website www.cozadhousingauthority.com. Ask about other rental programs that are available.

Offering a wide range of pharmaceutical services to meet your healthcare needs. We also carry a unique variety of: Candles & Home Fragrance • Gourmet Foods • Cards & Stationary Dinnerware • Gifts for Baby • Jewelry and Accessories Home and Garden Decor . . . and much more!

Serving Lexington and the surrounding communities for over 76 years.

Nebraskaland Tire 511 Plum Creek Parkway • Lexington, NE 68850 (308) 324-4604 Dave Giesbrecht, Manager

area fields, plus 3,400 irrigation wells providing water for crops. The Lexington area is a major player in livestock production, particularly cattle and hogs. More than 1 million cattle are finished in feedlots within a 50-mile radius of Lexington, 50,000 beef cows produce calves and over 100,000 hogs are produced in the area each year. Lexington is considered one of the top retail hubs in Nebraska for communities between 5,000 and 9,999, as named by the University of Nebraska, Agricultural Research Division. Most any product or service you could want can be found in Lexington, from major discount and department stores to many specialty shops. Whether you need to get a car serviced, or you’re looking for a night on the town, Lexington has something for everyone. Lexington is fortunate to have a downtown business district that is full of historical buildings and is home to many specialty shops. Also, Lexington has numerous businesses along Plum Creek Parkway. Non-manufacturing employers (20 or more) City of Lexington employs 71 in city government and services.

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600 N . Washington • Lexington • 308-324-4611

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All dishes made fresh to order Only the finest Italian pastas served Fresh herbs used Carry-out available Wine & Beer Served 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday

Bella Italia

114 W. 7th • Cozad, Nebraska • 308-784-3100

J & L Sinclair Truck - Tire Repair - Towing 24-Hour Service Michelin • Bridgestone • Toyo Minor Truck Repair Service Truck Available

501 Hwy 30 • PO Box 323 Overton, NE 68863 • 308-987-2310


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2011 Dawson County 411

aircraft landing strip are available at Johnson Lake. The Johnson Lake Yacht Club sponsors an annual invitational regatta with entries from several surrounding states. During the spring and fall the lake is a resting place for thousands of ducks and geese migrating along the nation’s central flyway. Starting in late February, the Sandhill cranes begin arriving and by mid-March, 70 percent of the world’s Sandhill cranes crowd a 150mile stretch of the Platte River through Central Nebraska. Prime viewing spots to see the majestic cranes are along river roads south of Highway 30, between Lexington and Kearney. Photographers and ornithologists from across the nation come to Central Nebraska to witness and record the spectacular sight of more than 200,000 sandhill cranes during their migratory stay in the area. The Lexington area is also a winter nesting site for an estimated 250 bald eagles. They feed primarily below the Central Nebraska Public Power District J-2 Hydroplant southeast of town. The J-2 Eagle Viewing Site is open to the public, free of charge, usually from December through January. For information, call the Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 324-5504. Dawson County Historical Museum, 805 N. Taft, offers 30,000 square feet of exhibit rooms displaying an outstanding collection of historical and pioneer artifacts, many of which were donated by families of pioneers who traveled the trails to settle Lexington and the surrounding area. The museum complex houses many examples of china and glassware, historic clothing and quilts, furniture, farm machinery and wagons, Native American artifacts, the locally-built McCabe Baby Biplane, a log cabin, train depot and an early rural school house built in 1888. The museum also houses on-going paleontology work on “Big Al,” a mammoth skeleton discovered north of Cozad, and features an art

gallery and archives for genealogical and other historical research. For information, call Dawson County Museum Director Barb Vondras, 3245340. Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles, located at the Lexington I-80 exit, features military vehicles and memorabilia from WW I, WW II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars as well as Operation Desert Storm. A living museum, nearly all the vehicles are fully operational and they have appeared in films, parades, festivals and veterans reunions. The building also houses a gift shop, public restrooms and educational displays. For information, call Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles Director Gary Gifford, 6329. The settlement of the West was a tumultuous time and two sites of Indian raids are commemorated near Lexington. Turkey Leg Raid Site, three miles west of Lexington, is the place where a Union Pacific Train was derailed and attacked by Indians. Plum Creek Massacre Cemetery, 14 miles southeast of Lexington, is where the victims of an Indian raid on a wagon train were buried. The Oregon Trail marker also is located south of Lexington. For directions, call the Dawson County Museum, 324-5340, or the Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 324-5504. Lexington Celebrations Annual celebrations include Cinco de Mayo in May, the Plum Creek Rodeo in June, an Old Fashioned Fourth of July celebration, the Johnson Lake Regatta, the Dawson County Fair in late July or early August, the Lexington Labor Day Antiques and Crafts Extravaganza and Hispanic Heritage Festival in September. Lexington Education For information about enrolling your child in school, call the superintendent’s office, 324-4681. New students must have a current immunization record

and a certified copy of his or her birth certificate. School District No. 1 in Dawson County, also known as Lexington Public Schools, covers approximately 38.3 square miles and has a total enrollment of nearly 3,000. The district is accredited by the State of Nebraska and the North Central Association of Schools and Universities. Lexington has four elementary schools: Pershing, Bryan, Morton and Sandoz. The middle school, located between 11th and 12th Streets along North Washington, was built in 1914, with additions in 1928, 1979, 1997 and 2000. Recent renovations include a new band room and chorus room. The school’s historic auditorium has also been refurbished with new seats, curtains and a state-of-the-art sound and lighting system, paid for in part by contributions from local businesses, individuals and organizations through a $1 million fund drive spearheaded by The Lexington Foundation. The high school, built in 1961, contains additions built in 1970, 1992, 1997, 2000 and 2008. Renovations include the construction of a new gymnasium and classrooms and the addition of a new vocational technology building and vocal/band room. Vocational courses offered in the high school include construction, careers, shop, industrial technology, architecture, drafting, woodworking, business systems, business law, business economics, and family and consumer science. Each school building contains facilities for the education of handicapped children, including a pre-school facility for students up to age 5 at Sandoz Elementary and at the Dawson County Opportunity Center with the Lexington Learning Academy classrooms. ESL courses are also offered throughout the system. City Government Lexington operates on a council/manager form of government. The public elects the council members for four-year terms; they in turn select the mayor for a

Dawson County Churches

Sixth and Madison 308-324-3095

Buffalo Grove Presbyterian Located six miles north of Lexington to Cozad Rd., four miles west, then one north. 308-324-4211 Calvary Assembly of God 13th and Adams 308-324-5310 Asamblea Centro Evangelico Maranatha 501 S. Madison 308-324-0127 Church of Christ 1211 N. Tyler St. 308-324-5022 Evangelical Free 810 S. Washington St. 308-324-3825

two-year term and hire the city manager. The Lexington City Council meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month, 5:30 p.m., at the City Municipal Building, 406 E. Seventh Street. Meetings are open to the public, and an agenda, kept continuously current, is available at the city office. Citizens asking the council to take action on an issue can be placed on the council agenda by calling the city manager, 324-2341. The city office also is the place to pay your utility bill and purchase building permits. Fire Protection Fire protection in Lexington is provided by a 40member volunteer fire department, with headquarters across the street east of the municipal building. Emergency and ambulance services, as well as mutual aid, also are provided. Protection in the rural area

is provided on a contract basis with the Lexington Rural Fire Department. Law Enforcement The Lexington Police Department employs 18 fulltime police officers and two full-time civilian workers. Dispatch services are coordinated with the Dawson County Dispatch System. Fire and police dispatch duties in Lexington are consolidated at the Lexington Law Enforcement Center, corner of Eighth and Grant, next to the Dawson County Courthouse. The Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, located at the corner of Eighth and Grant in Lexington, employs 66, including office, dispatch, jail employees and sheriff ’s deputies. If you need law enforcement assistance at night, call the Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department, 324-3011, or go to the Dawson County Law Enforcement Center and use the night-entry door between

First Baptist Church 713 Monroe 308-324-2909 First Christian 1206 N. Erie 308-324-2244 First Lutheran Church Highway 21 to Buffalo Rd., 4 1/2 miles west 308-324-6263 First Presbyterian Church 801 N. Lincoln 308-324-5507 First United Methodist Church 201 E. Eighth 308-324-2397 Grace Lutheran Church

105 E. 17th 308-324-2496

Iglesia Adventista del Septimo Dia Sabados Lexington 308-324-7111 Iglesia Cristiana Pentecostes 2003 Plum Creek Parkway 308-324-6586

Northside Church of Christ 704 E. Sixth St. 308-324-4182 Parkview Baptist 803 W. 18th St. 308-324-4410

Iglesia de Dios Camino de Santidad 500 N. Monroe St.

St. Ann’s Catholic Church (Iglesia Catolica De Santa Ana) 6th and Jackson Parish Offices: 1003 Taft St. 308-324-4647

Iglesia Dios Es Amor Jesucristo Salva Y Sana 521 N. Washington 308-324-7960 L.D.S. Church 1407 W. 13th 308-324-6840

St. John’s Lutheran Church - ELCA 42646 Rd. 764 308-784-3063 or 308-324-5915 St. Peter’s In the Valley Episcopal 905 E. 13th 308-324-6199

Chapel of the Lake Services each Sunday 8:30 a.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day

Interdenominational featuring guest ministers and a variety of special music.

Located along Hwy. 283 on the southeast side of Johnson Lake For information on weddings, funerals, etc. from Mid-May to Late September, call 308-785-2287

15

Trinity Lutheran Church 205 E. 7th 308-324-4341 Islamic Center of Lexington 114A W. 5th., Lexington 612-735-7546 (cell) 308-764-2405 (cell) COZAD American Lutheran Church 200 E. 12th St. 308-784-3264 Christ the King Catholic Church 1220 M St. 308-784-3959 Church of Christ 22nd and Newell 308-784-2700

GOOD FAMILY DINING! GOOD FAMILY FUN! Wednesday Night Specials Starting at 6:00 p.m. 1st Wed. Spaghetti Night 2nd Wed. Taco Night 3rd Wed. Beer & Burger Night Last Wed. Prime Rib Night


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Cozad Berean Church 16th and O 308-784-3675 Living Hope Assembly of God 1800 Kiowa Lane 308-784-4761

Church of Christ 18th and D 308-537-2164 Evangelical Free 1721 Lake Ave. 308-537-2261

Cozad Christian Church 821 Ave. F 308-784-4808

Faith Chapel 520 Ninth St. 308-537-7516

Cozad First Church of The Nazarene 919 Ave. H 308-784-3738

First Baptist Church 1002 Ave. C 308-537-2503

First Church of God 210 E. 14th St. 308-784-4074 First Presbyterian Church 819 E. St. 308-784-2717 GOTHENBURG Banner United Methodist Church 308-537-3258

First Presbyterian Church 1020 Lake Ave. 308-537-2210 First United Methodist Church 1401 Lake Ave. 308-537-2560 New Hope Evangelical Free 308-537-2812

Catholic Church 1915 Ave. J 308-537-3364 Seventh-Day Adventist 1520 Ave. D 308-537-3339 Svea Dahl Church Rural Brady 308-584-3544 Victory Assembly of God 2611 Lake Ave. 308-537-3047 Zion Evangelical Lutheran N. Hwy. 47 308-537-3194 FARNAM Farnam Church of the Nazarene 503 Main St. 308-569-2514 Farnam Methodist 303 Caribou St. 308-569-2532

EDDYVILLE Eddyville United Methodist 308-858-4918 OVERTON First Christian Church 601 C. Street 308-234-6816 Holy Rosary Church 503 D Street 308-987-2379

Our Lady of Good Counsel

United Methodist Church 401 6th Street 308-987-2223 SUMNER United Church of Sumner 308-752-9001 You are invited to visit Sumner, a northeast Dawson County community, located 20 miles northeast of Lexington.

Lexington is located on level terrain composed of deep, medium-textured soil developed on a welldrained and moderately wet terrace. The uplands on either side of the community are level to gently rolling to moderately rolling. Lexington Parks and Recreation Lexington has six parks covering more than 99 acres. Facilities include swimming pools, picnic tables, shelters, playground equipment, tennis courts, basketball courts, horseshoe pits, baseball/softball fields, soccer fields, volleyball, sand volleyball and a skate park. The city has 14 playgrounds with playground equipment and open play areas. Recreation programs include basketball, volleyball, softball, baseball, tennis, Plum Creek Road Race, soccer and adult supervised gym activities. For more information call Community Activities Director Ann Luther, 324-2498. Lexington has facilities for: Soccer: The city sponsors youth soccer each year and adult league

Lexington

soccer meets on Sundays at the soccer fields south of St. Ann’s Parish Center on Taft Street. The Optimist Recreation Complex near the airport on West 13th Street includes five soccer fields. Baseball: The Lexington Legion Field is located at the Optimist Recreation Complex on West 13th St. near the airport. Softball: Fields are scattered throughout the community. Three are located at the Rec Complex. Indoor hitting facility: A new indoor hitting facility for baseball and softball opened in 2006 at the Optimist Recreation Complex. It provides space for Baseball/Softball and golf warm-ups. The City of Lexington recreation director coordinates its use. Golf: Lakeside Country club, a private 18-hole grass greens course with clubhouse, is located at Johnson Lake, about 9 miles south of Lexington. There are also two golf courses about 13 miles away, one near Cozad in the west, and one near Overton in the east. Swimming: A family aquatic cen-

2011 Dawson County 411

ter with zero-depth (beach-type) entry, water slide and diving pit is near Memorial Park, Ninth and Monroe. The facility also includes a snack bar, sand volleyball court, sand play area and a splash pad. Swimming lessons are offered and the Lexington Swim Association sponsors a swim team. Tennis: Twelve lighted tennis courts and organized men’s, women’s and youth leagues are offered through the Lexington Women’s Tennis Association. For information call Mary Maloley, 324-2156. Fishing: Excellent fishing at Plum Creek Park’s six-acre lake, as well as Johnson Lake, the Platte River, Interstate 80 lakes, Tri-County Canal, Elwood Reservoir, Gallagher Canyon and many ponds and sandpits. Hunting: Area hunting for ducks, geese, wild turkey, upland birds and deer. Bowling: Strike and Spare, 1408 N. Adams, offers bowling on 12 lanes, with many organized leagues. 3244675. Boating: Boating at Johnson Lake, and canoeing on the Platte River.

5

Skateboarding: A skate park, built in 2006, is located in Oak Park, at the corner of Plum Creek Parkway and Oak. Grand Generation Center, 407 E. Sixth, Lexington, provides many recreational activities, including dancing, strength training, quilting, cards and pool for area seniors. The center, administered by the city, serves noon meals on weekdays and provides “Meals on Wheels” and Handi-Bus services. For more information, call Director Ann Luther, 3242498. Johnson Lake, nine miles south of Lexington on U.S. Highway 283, has a surface area of 3,030 acres and 20 miles of shoreline, providing excellent fishing, swimming, boating and skiing. More than 900 families have built homes and cabins adjoining the lake. Two state recreation areas provide facilities for camping, playground equipment, shower and restroom facilities and picnic equipment in tree-shaded areas. Two public docks, restaurants, boat rental and service, marina and an

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Bruce L. Hanson, D.D.S., P.C.

Plum Creek Parkway 324-8003 East Highway 30 324-3468 Lexington

Preventive Family Dentistry Dr. Bruce Hanson; Marnie Marquardt, RDH; Michelle Seberger; Kristin Heine & Susi Gonzalez

www.allpoints.coop Plum Creek Parkway

308-537-7141 or 1-866-320-6464

East Highway 30

6th & Jackson • P.O. Box 626 Lexington, NE 68850 (308) 324-5551

Offering the most thorough exams and highest quality eyewear in the tri-city area.

Ted J. Harvey & Jason T. Seim Office: 308.324.5631 Fax: 308.324.3096

Doctors of Optometry 801 N. Grant St. • P.O. Box 637 Lexington, NE 68850


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Program), 324-6212 Lexington Area United Way, (Services for families and children by referral), 324-5774

Parkway, 324-1841 COZAD SCHOOLS Cozad High School, 17th and Meridian, 784-2744 Cozad Middle School, 1810 Meridian, 784-2746 East Elementary, 420 E. 14th, 7843462 Cozad Early Education Center (preschool), 420 W. 14th, 784-3381

HOUSING Lexington Housing Authority, 3244633 Cozad Housing Authority, 784-3661 Gothenburg Housing Authority, 537-7275 Eustis-Farnam Housing Authority, 784-3661 Overton Housing Authority, 7843661 ADULT EDUCATION Lexington Community Education (Adult Ed, English as a Second Language, GED), 324-8480 Lexington Area Chamber of Commerce, 302 E. 6th, 324-5504 Cozad Chamber of Commerce, 135 W. Eighth, 784-3930 Gothenburg Chamber of Commerce, 1021 Lake Avenue, 5373505 Lexington United Way, 324-5774 Dawson County Museum, 805 N. Taft, Lexington, 324-5340 Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles, 606 Heartland Rd.,

Lexington, 324-6329 100th Meridian Museum, 206 E. Eighth, Cozad, 784-1100 Robert Henri Museum/Hendee Hotel, 218 East Eighth Street, Cozad, 784-4154. LEXINGTON SCHOOLS Superintendent’s office, 300 S. Washington, 324-4681 Lexington High School, 13th and Adams, 324-4691 Lexington Middle School, 1100 N. Washington, 324-2349

Lexington Developmental Center, 17th and Washington, 324-6414 Bryan Elementary School, 1003 N. Harrison, 324-3762 Morton Elementary School, 505 S. Lincoln, 324-3764 Pershing Elementary School, 1104 N. Tyler, 324-3765 Sandoz Elementary School, 1711 N. Erie St., 324-5540 Head Start, 931-1/2 W. Seventh, 3245282 Lexington Early Learning Academy, 1501 S. Plum Creek

GOTHENBURG SCHOOLS Gothenburg Superintendent’s Office, 537-3653 Gothenburg Junior/Senior High School, 1415 G Street, 537-3651 Dudley Elementary School, 1415 G Street, 537-7178 Liberty Heights Christian School, 3307 Lake Ave., 848-4740 OVERTON SCHOOLS Overton schools, 401 Seventh Street, 987-2424 SUMNER-EDDYVILLE-MILLER High School, 762-2925 Topography Lexington is 2,408 feet above sea level.

Sumner first appeared on the map when the post office was established there on Aug. 6, 1889. Named for Sen. Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, an advocate of the abolition of slavery, Sumner was surveyed in June and platted in July of 1890. Located along the Wood River the fun-loving folks in Sumner enjoy several community gatherings each year and work on community improvements with a team spirit. Annual activities include a community Easter Egg Hunt, a big Fourth of July celebration with a rodeo on July 3 at 1:30 p.m. and another rodeo session on the Fourth at 7 p.m. There is a rodeo dance on the Fourth and a big parade every year with 90100 entries. Other activities on the Fourth include a volleyball tournament, foot races, a boat race, the Firemen’s Barbecue, a car show, crafts, money pile, live entertainment, fireworks and more. In September the community hosts a back-toschool picnic, and in December a Soup and Santa night. The Sumner Commercial Club, Sumner Saddle Club, Sumner EMT’s and Fire Department all work together to make these annual events a huge success. Sumner is the home of Tub’s Pub, famous for home cooking, big homemade, chicken-fried steaks, prime rib and lots more. Sumner has two churches, the United Church

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and Grace Lutheran Church. Sumner’s community park is one of the nicest ones around, featuring a sod house and plenty of shade and Sumner offers youth softball and baseball programs during the summer. Our school is consolidated with the communities of Sumner, Eddyville and Miller (SEM) all sending students to the K-12 Class D-2 school. We have 182 students and the community is very proud of all the youth activities in sports and academics. We are known as the “Home of the Mustangs.” Our town currently has a population of 229. The proud businesses of Sumner include: Steve’s Welding Shop, Ed’s Body Shop, Sumner Market, All Points Cooperative, Moorman’s Feed, Five Points Bank, Dawson Public Power, S & S Plumbing, Sleicher Heating and Air, The Mane Salon, Butch’s Repair and Used Cars, Schueter’s Body Shop, Wee-Care Daycare and of course, Tub’s Pub. Sumner Village Clerk: Maria Hollander, 752-3015. The village has regular board meetings on the second Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Sumner Community Hall. Board chairman is Darrell Barta with board members including Clifford Hemenway, Joe Dodd, Dave Irwin and Cory Ansbach. Farnam is located in southwest Dawson County with Lincoln County one-half mile west and Frontier County one-half mile south.

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2011 Dawson County 411

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2011 Dawson County 411

Keystone, situated two miles east of where Farnam is located today, was the original site of the early settlers of Farnam who later moved to what is Farnam. Farnam was named in honor of Henry Farnam, a railroad builder and philanthropist who was born in New York in 1803. Many former residents report that Saturday night was a really big deal with everyone coming in and streets being pack. Some even took in a show. Farnam is a feisty community, evidenced by its’ ability to bounce back from a devastating fire last March that claimed the community fire hall and meeting room. Three fire-fighting vehicles were destroyed, and those that were res-

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Farnam

cued, including a new pumper truck suffered smoke and heat damage. Through the course of the summer residents worked through state and federal agencies to obtain grants to build a new fire hall and meeting room, as well as raise money of their own. The new structure is nearly double the size of the old fire hall and includes a hazardous materials room, a lounge and enlarged community room. Farnam has contracts with Dawson County for law enforcement. The 911 emergency number goes to Frontier County at Curtis and they dispatch the information out on pagers to individuals who are on the fire department and EMT squad. The Farnam and Eustis Schools

merged in 1997 and at the time of the merger, there were 347 students in the district. Current enrollment is 213. Superintendent is Carl Dietz, a 1975 graduate of Farnam High School. Despite challenges brought on by the merger and fiscal pressures that accompany declining enrollment, the district is committed to quality, innovative educational opportunities and students continue to exceed national averages on norm-referenced assessments. Farnam has three churches Catholic, Methodist and Nazarene and each maintains regular services and activities. Community activities each year include a community carnival February 23 and Founder’s Day, a

2011 Dawson County 411

Where to call in Dawson County

weekend of activities set for June. Also in the spring is an annual Easter Egg Hunt for the smaller children. The community continues to work on more grants to help improve the village for the future. The Youth Community Improvement Program is more active again and has been involved in recycling aluminum cans, fixing up the village tennis court, helping with trash pickup along the highway and more. For more information contact: Farnam Village Clerk, Norma Darnall, 308-569-2355. Originally named Congdon, this tiny Dawson County community traces its beginnings to a post office established May 23, 1881, three miles

training programs. Call 324-8480 or toll-free at 1-877-222-0780. All local area codes are (308):

EMERGENCY Emergency (police, fire, ambulance) - 911 Lexington Food Pantry, 931 W. Seventh, 324-4219 Love In Action (clothing, light housekeeping items), 907 W. Eighth, Lexington, 324-5353 Seventh-Day Adventist Church (clothing), 1520 E. St., Gothenburg, 537-3339 Parent-Child Center (domestic violence, sexual assault), 1001 N. Washington, Lexington, 324-2336 24-hour Crisis Line (in Lexington), 324-3040; 24-hour Crisis Line toll-free, 1-800-215-3040 Dawson County Civil Defense, 3243011 LAW ENFORCEMENT Nebraska State Patrol, 1-800-5255555 Lexington Police Department (Acting Chief Tracy Wolf), 324-2317 Gothenburg Police Department (Chief Randy Olson), 537-3608 Cozad Police Department (Chief Mark Montgomery), 784-2366 Dawson County Sheriff ’s Department (Sheriff Gary Reiber), 324-3011 Dawson County Crimestoppers (callers can report crime information anonymously), 1-866-652-7383 Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline, 1-800422-4453 Dawson County Probation Office, 324-5615 HEALTH/MEDICAL

Tri-County Community Health and Fitness Center, 1600 W. 13th St., Lexington, 324-6884 Tri-County Hospital, 13th and Erie, Lexington, 324-5651 Tri-County Hospice, 13th and Erie, Lexington, 324-8300 Maternal Health Clinic, 207 E. Sixth, Lexington, 324-6223 Plum Creek Medical Group, 1103 Buffalo Bend, Lexington, 324-6386 Plum Creek Surgery, 1101 Buffalo Bend, Lexington, 324-5660 Lexington Chiropractic Center, 104 W. Seventh St., 324-5948 Park Avenue Estates, 1811 Ridgeway, Lexington, 324-5490 Plum Creek Care Center and WELLife at Plum Creek, 1505 N. Adams, Lexington, 324-5531 Homestay Village, 503 B St., Overton, 784-3661 Elwood Care Center, 607 Smith Ave., Elwood, 785-3302 Cozad Community Medical Clinic, 1803 Papio Lane, Cozad, 784-3535 Cozad Wellness Center, 218 E. 16th, Cozad, 784-5100 Golden LivingCenter, 318 W. 18th, Cozad, 784-3715 Stone Hearth Estates, 110 20th St., Gothenburg, 537-7771 Hilltop Estates, 2520 Ave. M, Gothenburg, 537-7138 Gothenburg Memorial Hospital, 910 20th, Gothenburg, 537-3661 Gothenburg Family Practice Associates, 902 20th., Gothenburg, 537-7131 Gothenburg Medical Arts Building, 610 10th St., Gothenburg, 537-3673 Tri-County Hospital Home Health Care, 1600 W. 13th St., Lexington, 3248300

Lexington Family Eyewear, 111 E. Eighth St., Lexington, 324-5631 Central Plains Home Health (Cozad), 300 E. 12th St., Cozad, 7844630 or 1-800-243-9872 Lifeline (24-hour personal emergency response system), 784-4630 Cancer Information Services, 1-800422-6237 National AIDS Hotline (callers remain anonymous, open 24 hours), 1-800-232-4636. Nebraska Department of Health, 200 S. Silber St., North Platte, (308) 535-8134 Al-Anon Family Groups, 1-800-3442666 Heartland Counseling and Consulting Clinic, 307 E. Fifth St., Lexington, 324-6754 Four Roads Counseling, 513 N. Grant St., Lexington, 324-0222 Lutheran Family Services, 207 W. 7th St., Lexington, 324-6223 Alcohol Treatment Referrals, National 24-hour help and referral network, 1-800-252-6465 Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, National Referral Service, 1-800-662-4357

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Mental Health, Drug & Alcohol 24hour Crisis Line, 534-6963 (call collect) Hotline for Disability Services (Voice/TTY), 1-800-742-7594 Poison Control Center (Voice/TTY/TDD), 1-800-222-1222 FAMILY SERVICES Dawson County Immunization Clinic, Clinic of Good Health, 1-877209-3723 x143 Department of Health and Human Services, 800 N. Washington, Lexington, 324-6633 Community Action Partnership of Mid-Nebraska (immunization), 931 W. Seventh Street, Lexington, 324-4219 National Hotline for Missing and Exploited Children, 1-800-843-5678 Girls and Boys Town National Hotline, 1-800-448-3000, TDD 1-800-4481833 Runaway Teen Hotline, 1-800-7862929 Dawson County Parent-Child Center, 324-2336 or 1-800-215-3040 Compassionate Friends (support for bereaved families), 324-3538 Women, Infant and Children (WIC

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2011 Dawson County 411

Dawson County has what it takes

Progress seems to be synonymous with Dawson County. Even in the midst of economic hardships, Dawson County continues to elevate itself and its citizens. Nearly all of the communities continue to experience economic upswings with a variety of developmental projects launched or completed. Lexington is expanding with construction that is. Tri-County

Lexington High School and Morton Elementary School. LHS added new classrooms and a state of the art band room. Morton Elementary was the recipient of a new gymnasium and in 2010 Pershing Elementary also added a new gymnasium. The former Walmart building across from Tyson’s Fresh Meats, Inc., was purchased by the city and is in the last phase of revamping the space within it to become a center for educational development. The building did serve as a FEMA assistance base for those seeking help from the floods of 2008. News and Information for Dawson County Newspapers based in Dawson County are the Lexington ClipperHerald, the Overton Beacon-Observer, the Hospital is in the middle of a three-phase con- Tri-City Tribune in Cozad and the Gothenstruction projected burg Times. The Elwood aimed to expand on Bulletin and the Fort existing facilities and Kearney Post also circuturn the emergency room into a more easily late in Dawson County. accessible place to visit. Newspapers With the first phase The Lexington completed last year, Clipper-Herald is diswork on the next two tributed on Wednesdays phases is soon to follow. and Saturdays. SubIn 2008, construction scription rates are $48 was completed on per year for Lexington, expansions for rural Lexington, ElHeartland Museum of wood, Overton, Cozad, Military Vehicles, Gothenburg, Eddyville,

Oconto, Sumner, Smithfield, Bertrand and Elm Creek, and $58 per year elsewhere. Papers are available at racks or dealers throughout Dawson County for 75 cents. For information call 308-3245511. The Gothenburg Times is published each Wednesday by Greg and Kathi Viergutz. Subscription rates are $29.95 per year in Dawson County, Brady and Arnold; $32.50 per year in the remainder of Nebraska; and $38 per year for subscribers outside Nebraska. Single copies are 75 cents each or $2.25 if mailed. To subscribe, call 308-5373636. The Tri-City Tribune is published by Dean Dorsey and is distributed on Thursdays. Subscription rates are $29.50 per year for home delivery and immediate area and $39.50 for out of county and elsewhere Nebraska and out-of-state, or 75 cents per copy off the rack. To subscribe call 308784-3644. Radio Carrying local news are: Lexington’s KRVNAM (880 KHz) and KRVN-FM (93.1 MHz); Kearney’s KRNY (1460 KHz), KQKY-FM (105.9 MHz), KGFW (1340

KHz); and North Platte’s KJLT (970 KHz), KODY (1240 KHz) and KELN (1410 KHz). The Lexington radio station generally carries information about area school closings, due to inclement weather, during early morning broadcasts. Television Television stations carrying local and area news are KLNE-TV, Lexington, Channel 3; KNOP-TV, North Platte, Channel 2; KPNE, North Platte, Channel 9; KOLN/KGIN-TV, Lincoln/Grand Island, Channel 10/11; KHGITV, Channel 13, Kearney. In Lexington the local educational access channel is Channel 6. For information on cable TV service in Cozad, call 1-888-6006626. For information on cable TV service in Eustis or Farnam, call Consolidated Cable at 1800-742-7464. For information on cable TV service in Gothenburg, call 1-888600-6626. For information on cable TV service in Lexington, contact the North Platte office of Charter Communications, 1510 E. Fourth St.,

1-877-800-9175. Internet Access to the World Wide Web is available in Dawson County through a variety of sources. Check with your local cable service provider or phone book listings for Internet providers. Community College The Central Community College System encompasses 25 counties and has learning centers in Cozad, Lexington, Gothenburg, Arapahoe, Cambridge, Beaver City and Kearney. A Distance Learning Program provides opportunities for students to complete a business and management degree through off-campus students. The business and management degree program uses state-ofthe art teaching technologies for delivery of courses. Satellite courses, computer conferencing and other interactive programs allow students to complete degree work without driving to one of the campuses. Central Community College works with area industries, retail establishments and other agencies and organizations in planning inservice or in-plant

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southwest of the present village. Officials of the Kearney and Black Hills Railroad whose line opened through the Wood River Valley that fall changed the name to Eddyville on Nov. 12, 1890. The village was named for a Miss Eddy, an acquaintance of John H. Hamilton, president of both the railroad and the Wood River Improvement Co., which bought and platted the community in the summer of 1890. Eddyville is nestled in the beautiful Wood River Valley in northeast Dawson County along Nebraska Highway 40. Small, but mighty, might be a good description for Eddyville, which strives to provide wholesome, familyoriented activities for its citizens and those who stop to visit. Annual events include a wild game feed in January featuring wild turkey, deer, elk and Canadian fish, harvested by local hunters both in Nebraska and abroad, and in February there is a community pancake feed. Both of these events are sponsored by the Eddyville Volunteer Fire Department. Highlight of the year, however, is the annual Dinner Theater at the Eddyville Community Building. This year the event reached its 29th anniversary. The melodrama featured local actors and actresses and homemade soup and pie were served to guarantee a great time by those attending. Proceeds help the Eddyville Methodist Church and maintenance of the community building. The Eddyville Trail Riders will host their 41th annual rodeo the third weekend in June. The rodeo is approved by the Nebraska State Rodeo Association and the Mid-States Rodeo Association. A street dance follows the Saturday night performance. It’s the orneriest little rodeo in the valley. Eddyville is the home of the famous “Buzzard’s Roost,” a deep, long canyon about one mile north of Eddyville. The Buzzard’s Roost was originally about 2,520 acres in Custer County owned by John B. Colton. One canyon has a large cave that reportedly was a haven for rustlers and robbers. You can still enjoy the scenery of the Roost by participating in the annual spring and fall Trail Rides through Buzzard’s Roost. There is a spring in May and a fall ride in September.

Eddyville

A sack lunch at Buzzard’s Roost provides a nice break before the riders return to town for a barbecue. For those not wishing to ride a horse, horse-drawn racks will be available. The 3rd annual Eddyville Mud Drags will be September 19th. The proceeds from this event are donated to the Eddyville Community Building. This makes for a September weekend full of good times. Wrapping up the year is the “Soup and Santa” activity December 13th. Proceeds are used to help maintain the community’s holiday decorations. Local businesses include the Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, with daily lunch specials Monday through Friday with menu items off the grill from 5:00-9:00 on Monday through Saturday evenings. In Good Taste, featuring catering and homemade baked items, Eddyville Credit Union, Stryker Tractor Repair, which sells and services tractors and sells Dixon mowers, Mill Iron West Leather Shop, Barb’s Beauty Shop, The Busted Knuckle Garage, a full service mechanic shop, which does everything from auto, light truck, small engine, irrigation motors and fabrication, U.S. Post Office and The Eddyville Pit Stop, a gas station and hardware store. The Eddyville Rural Fire District covers a 193-square-mile territory that includes the rugged canyons of northeast Dawson County. There are 40 members on the fire department and two emergency medical service members.

The Eddyville Methodist Church is the community’s lone active congregation with service every Sunday mornings at 10 a.m. Two UMW Circles meet monthly.

2011 Dawson County 411

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The Catholic Church is used for special services and events such as All Soul Day, St. Patrick’s Day and bingo. Other local organizations include Buzzard Chicks, Red Hat Ladies and the American Legion Auxiliary. Eddyville is part of the SumnerEddyville-Miller Schools, a Class II K12 school in rural Dawson County, with property in Custer and Buffalo Counties as well. Nearly 200 students attend school in the district, which has a 206 square-mile boundary. The district qualifies as a Title I school and competes in extra-curricular activities in the D-2 category, the smallest of high schools in Nebraska. Average class size is 15 students. For more information contact: Eddyville Village Clerk: Kay Kennicutt, 858-4535 Overton was settled in 1873 by the James M. Potter family and the post office was established on June 3, 1873. The community was named in honor of a government official who

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Maintenance, lawncare and snow removal are also provided. Rent is based on income for this federally funded project. The Overton Public Schools provide instruction for students in grades K-12. A Class D-1 school, Overton’s current enrollment is 286. Superintendent is Mark Aten and the office number is 987-2424. The population at the 2000 census was 665, up from 633 in 1980. For more information contact: Overton Village Clerk, Kristi Purintun, 987-2433. Village Board: Mark Dolan, chairman; Marlene Olmstead, Troy Olmstead, Howard Roth and Jean Raney. Village Office Hours: 8 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Utilities Superintendent: Stan Jeffries.

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was in charge of men guarding construction workers on the Union Pacific Railroad. It continued to be part of the nation’s cross-country transportation system as first the Lincoln Highway, and later U.S. Highway 30 passed through the community. A historic Lincoln Highway bridge is located just east of the village and was refurbished recently by members of the Overton Boy Scouts. Last year construction was completed on a new overpass that provided a safer link for citizens and emergency personnel over the railroad tracks to Interstate 80. Overton is also a fun place to go antique hunting with not one, but two businesses offering treasures from yesteryear. Foster Lumber opened in 2004 and R & S Market provides a communitygathering place and grocery stop. Homestay Village offers eight onebedroom apartments for the elderly and disabled one block from downtown, the post office and senior center where noon meals are served.

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