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Kimono, detail. Silk with embroidered decoration and metallic thread. Japan, 1870-90.


Kimono, detail. Bast woven fibre made using the kasuri technique. Japan, 19th century.


Kimono, detail. Silk crÛpe with dyed, stencilled and embroidered decoration. Japan, 1800-30.


Flowers, Clouds & Butterflies kimono, detail of side. Bast fibre. Okinawa, Japan, 1820-80.


Irises by a Stream and Bridge, detail of a Kimono. Bast fibre with paste-resist. Japan, 1800-50.


Kimono entitled Ise, detail, by Shimura Fukumi. Woven silk. Kyoto, Japan, 1988. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.


Detail of a Kimono, depicting scattered flowers. CrĂŞpe silk with paste-resist and embroidered decoration. Japan, c.1780-1820.


Hollyhocks and Snowflakes, details on kimono. Figured silk with stencilled and embroidered decoration. Japan, 1750-1800.


Floral Pattern on Kimono. Silk brocade. Japan, late 19th century.


Kimono, detail. Bast fibre with cotton stitch embroidery. Japan, 19th20th century.


Green Waves Kimono, by Moriguchi Kunihiko. Silk, with paste-resist dyed decoration. Kyoto, Japan, 1973.


Kimono (detail), 1700-1750. Museum no. FE.13-1983 The fabric used to make this kimono is of a kind known as rinzu, a monochrome patterned silk the weaving technique for which was introduced to Japan from China in the16th century. Like most rinzu it is woven with a small key-fret and flower pattern known as sayagata. The flower and hexagon pattern was created using stencils and embroidery.


Kimono, detail. Embroidered silk. Japan, 1912-15.


This 20th century kimono would have been worn by a young woman. The design of open fans, flowers and a meandering stream is a traditional one, but the dense, lively pattern and brilliant colours would have made it a very modern garment.


Kimono, detail of the lining. Silk crĂŞpe and embroidered decoration. Japan, late 19th century.


Kimono, detail. Brocade silk. Japan, late 19th century.


Kimono, 1850-1880. Museum no. T. 72-1957.


Kimono, detail. Satin silk, embroidered with silk and metallic threads. Japan, late 19th century.


Kimono, 1850-1900. Museum no. T.155-1965. Silk crepe, resist-dyed with paste-resist dyeing (yuzen), stencilled imitation tie-dyeing (kata kanoko) and embroidery. The motifs on this kimono illustrate the tale of Urashima Taro.


Kimono, 1780-1800. Museum no. FE.106-1982. This kimono has been decorated using ink, embroidery and a stencil-dyeing technique called kata kanoko. Across the shoulders of the kimono are various characters taken from the 'Poems of Congratulation' in the 10th-century Kokinshu anthology. Incorporating the written word into the design of the kimono would have demonstrated the literary discernment of the wearer.


Kimono, 1820-1860. Museum no. T. 79-1927. The combination of delicate embroidery and dark blue satin fabric give this kimono a striking, lustrous appearance. This kimono has a design of ducks on rippling water among flowers. Paired ducks are a symbol of marital harmony, so this kimono may have been part of a wedding trousseau.


Stripes on kimono, detail. Silk woven with selectively pre-dyed yarns. Japan, late 19th century.


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1800-1830 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Figured silk satin with tie-dyed and embroidered decoration


Kimono, 1830-1880. Museum no. T. 266-1968 The elegant design of pine trees on this kimono was created using a technique called yuzen. This involves drawing the pattern on the cloth with rice paste extruded through the metal tip of a cloth bag. The paste forms a protective coat that prevents the dye penetrating. The large pattern areas were then completely blocked with paste before the background colour was applied. The cloud areas have been created using gold leaf and tiny parts of the design have been highlighted with touches of embroidery.


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1850-1880 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Polychrome figured silk, lining of monochrome figured twill silk and crepe silk with embroidery in metallic thread Credit Line: Given by Mr T. B. Clark-Thornhill


Kimono, 1830-1880. Museum no. T. 269-1960 This striking kimono has long swinging sleeves, indicating that it would have been worn by a young unmarried woman, while the large padded hem reveals that it was designed as an outer garment for winter wear. The shimmering white ground has been embroidered with chrysanthemums and other flowers and large butterflies, no two of which are the same.


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1870-1880 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Crepe silk with paste-resist decoration and embroidery


Figure 3 - Kimono, 1920-1950. Museum no. FE.145-2002


'Flight', Kimono and stencils, Yoshichi Matsubara, 1990. Museum no. FE. 10-1995


Figure 2 - Kimono, 1910-1930. Museum no. FE.144-2002


Figure 1 - Kimono, 1910-1930. Museum no. FE.17-1994


Wedding kimono, 1934. Museum no. FE.138-2002


Figure 1 - Highly embroidered Kimono, 1870-1900. Museum no. FE.14-1983


Kimono for a woman, 1930-50. Montgomery Collection


Figure 2 - Kimono, 1868-1912. Museum no. FE.7-198


Figure 3 - Kimono, 1870-1880. Museum no. FE.29-1987


'Kimono for Women', 1800-50, monochrome figured silk (rinzu) with tie-dye (shibori) and embroidery. Museum no. FE.101-1982


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1920-1930 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Stencil-printed gauze weave silk Credit Line: Given by Moe Co. Ltd.


Kimono Place of origin: Shuri (Ry没ky没, made) Date: 18th century-19th century (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Cotton, with stencilled decoration (bingata)


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: early 19th century (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Crepe silk with paste-resist decoration (chaya-zome), stencilled imitation tie-dye (kata kanoko) and embroidery in silk and metallic threads


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1920-1940 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Resist-dyed silk Credit Line: Given by Moe Co. Ltd.


Furisode kimono, 1790-1830. Museum no. FE.32-1982


Resist-dyed fireman's coat, late 19th-early 20th century. Museum no. FE.107-1982


Haori (kimono jacket) Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1921 (made) Artist/Maker: Unknown (production) Materials and Techniques: Printed silk Credit Line: Acquired in memory of Mrs Ebba Oljemark Minale


Kimono Place of origin: Japan (made) Date: 1937 (made) Materials and Techniques: Printed wool


v&a kimono  

v&a kimono

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