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dedicated themselves to their service and lived within the walls or courtyard of the temple over months or even years. These people were exempt from taxes and, if condemned to prison, could not be taken from the temple. Therefore, some interpreters assumed that all this had nothing to do with ecstatic possession by the divinity, but simply that these people took refuge in the sanctuary only to escape the police or anyone else who was after them. From the psychological viewpoint, however, quarrels about this subject are sterile. One could say simply that it means to be under the domination of an archetype, or in the service of an archetypal figure, in a state of trance or inner transformation. The katachos submitted himself voluntarily to captivity which could last for years and withdrew from the outer world. A criminal also who would find refuge in the temple was virtually imprisoned; for if he put a foot outside he was caught; if he had committed some misdemeanor, he had the choice of a secular or a religious prison—in either case it was a prison. About thirty years ago a papyrus was found written by a man named Ptolemaios, who lived in the katoché of a Serapis temple in Egypt. He wrote down his dreams, which was obligatory, and it seems as though the priests had interpreted them. If one read Artemidoros’s dream book, one would think that people dreamed differently then, dreaming only of synchronistic events, and that they had only “big dreams.” But, this is not true. It is just that in the scientific dream literature of antiquity, only such dreams were recorded. But in this papyrus of Ptolemaios the dreams of an ordinary man were preserved, and they are quite ordinary. He dreamed of his family, of money problems, and so on. These dreams are not understandable for us, because we do not have the personal associations, but at least we know through them that those people dreamed exactly as we do, though the rest of the literature recounts in detail only the archetypal dreams. In the temenos or the katoché around the temple there were even priests who specialized in the interpretation of dreams.14 So those in the katoché were actually “in analysis.” The procedure was the same as today except that the conclusions drawn from the dreams were somewhat different. So the katoché was a voluntary state of complete introversion and concentration on one’s dream life.15 During this time the following dream comes to Lucius: On a night the great priest appeared unto me in a dream presenting his lap full of treasure, and when I demanded what it signified, he answered that

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie Louise Von Franz - The Golden Ass of Alpulius  

Marie Louise Von Franz - The Golden Ass of Alpulius  

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