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the institution of the Church, so that a part of her mystical quality was projected onto the institution of the Church, the Mater Ecclesia. Jung discusses this problem in Psychological Types when he comments on the book The Shepherd of Hermas,20 in which the author writes of his conversion to Christianity. The book was probably composed from elements of Jewish, Oriental, and Greek material. Hermas has made it into a pamphlet of early Christian propaganda, describing his visions and the inner experiences which led to his conversion to the Catholic Church. To Hermas there appears in a vision an old woman whom he calls Domina, the goddess, or mistress, who gives him advice and shows him the vision of a tower which is the Church. This vision is probably not all genuine, for much conscious material has been added to it. But the idea of his being initiated into the Catholic Church by an old woman, a dark figure, is certainly genuine and shows where the goddess continued to live. She had been transformed into the Ecclesia, the mother Church, so that a motherly quality was projected onto the institution of the Church, which replaced the figure of lsis. Two aspects got lost through this development: First, the human-personal aspect of the goddess (an institution is never very human) and, second, the relationship to matter. For Isis was also an image for cosmic matter, and this aspect is not contained in the institution of the Church. There is, however, a certain concretism which compensates negatively for the lack of matter: the Pope represents God on earth, and matter is somehow contained in the Church, insofar as it is a concrete organization. But matter in our modern view is also a divine cosmic principle, as modern physics might discover soon. In the Middle Ages, however, these two aspects disappeared from the general consciousness, while some other aspects survived in the institution. If one has Catholic priests in analysis, one sees that their anima is projected into the Church. She is the carrier of the mother anima figure and partly replaces the real woman. The priest experiences the Church as mother-bride not only allegorically, but quite concretely. On the other hand the priest is the bride of Christ, he is therefore “feminine� and wears feminine clothes. He is thus simultaneously male and female. If he understands what he is doing, this could offer him the possibility of an experience of psychic totality, reached by the painful sacrifice of sexual life. On the other hand, the fact that a human institution replaces a divine power obviously creates a great problem. This situation has also led to other consequences. If the human and

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Marie Louise Von Franz - The Golden Ass of Alpulius  

Marie Louise Von Franz - The Golden Ass of Alpulius  

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