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into a state of shelteredness in God. Mandala structures occur in the dreams and fantasies of modern man’s unconscious with the same significance: as Jung has shown, they symbolize the inner psychic wholeness of the individual. In this symbol of wholeness psychic cleavages are healed, and accordingly such images usually appear at times of extreme suffering and profound conflict. Their appearance conveys a feeling of order in chaos and has a healing effect. Psychologically such a symbol cannot be distinguished from an image of the godhead. The Turkestan tale outlined above (“The Magic Horse”) shows with particular clarity why the helpful animal has a purely positive value in fairy tales: it embodies something that is at first manifested as the animal instinct in man, but behind which the secret of individuation, that is, the acquisition of inner wholeness, is concealed. Anyone who can enter into the innermost center of his own psyche, his Self, is safe against the assaults of the dark powers. That is why, in Och, the hero is saved in the form of a grain of wheat and, in “The Magician Tsar,” in the form of a flint. Both are symbols of the incarnate godhead or of what in Jungian psychology is called the Self.55 It is highly interesting to note that most of those symbols in which the above-mentioned murderous giant keeps his heart hidden—island, church, well, duck, egg, etc.—are also symbols of wholeness. Unfortunately I cannot demonstrate this fact in the limited space at my disposal, but those who are familiar with the works of Jung will bear this out. Thus divine wholeness is the strategic “weak point” of the evil one. That is, where he has his heart or his “death,” that is where he can be destroyed. The Chinese Book of Changes56 says: Evil, which lives on negation, is not destructive to the good alone, but inevitably destroys itself as well in the end.57 No doubt this is so because it represents only a splitoff part of the whole, to which, for that very reason, God’s wholeness is ultimately superior. In the above-mentioned fairy tale the partial existence of evil is symbolized by the remoteness of the giant’s heart. The island indicates the isolation of goodness, on which the giant, in spite of everything, is nevertheless dependent. But one cannot help wondering, why does the hero crush the egg, the symbol of wholeness on which the life of the evil principle depends? One would expect him rather to hatch it out, to develop this germ of goodness in the darkness, not to destroy it. But evidently the secret softness, the good impulse hidden in the darkness, is too weak to grow into true wholeness; it is only a germ or beginning,

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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