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father’s stable with her, and on his advice also takes a mirror, a comb, salt, and a carnation, which—as in the “magical flight” already described—she later throws behind her when she runs away from the demon. The carnation becomes a thicket of briers, the salt becomes an ocean, the comb a mountain, and the mirror a raging torrent. All these delay the div but cannot kill him, and later on he begins once again to harry the heroine, who in the meanwhile has married a king and borne him two sons. Then the helpful little talking horse decides to attack the div himself, and the two engage in a long, drawnout fight under water in which the horse is victorious. When he comes out of the water, he asks the dismayed queen to slaughter him. Then the queen did everything the horse had asked. She threw the head aside, pointed the legs in four directions, threw away the entrails, and sat down with her children under the ribs. Then from the legs grew golden poplars with emerald leaves, from the entrails villages, fields, and wheat, and from the ribs a golden castle. But from the head sprang a silvery brooklet. In a word, the whole region was transformed into a true paradise. Here the queen remained, and here the king later found her, whereupon the four of them lived happily ever after in the kingdom that had grown up out of the horse. In this story we find a late echo of the ancient Indian horse sacrifice, as described at the beginning of the Brhadaranyaka Upanishad: Verily, dawn is the head of the sacrificial horse, the sun his eye, the wind his breath, universal fire his open mouth. The year is the body of the sacrificial horse, the sky his back, the atmosphere his belly, the earth the underpart of his belly. . . . The rising sun is his forepart, the setting sun his hindpart. . . . Verily, day was created for the horse as the sacrificial dish which stands before him; its place is the world-ocean towards the east. Night was created for the sacrificial horse as the sacrificial dish which stands behind him; its place is the world-ocean towards the west. . . .53 As Jung explains,54 the horse sacrifice signifies a renunciation of the world, a sacrifice of all the energy that pours out into the world, and entrance into a creative state of introversion. This applies also to the horse sacrifice of our fairy tale. The golden castle in the rectangle framed by four golden poplars is a mandala; that is, an archetypal image which in the religions of the East, in those of primitive peoples, and in our own tradition, is an image of the godhead. Thus the four figures—king, queen, and their two sons—enter

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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