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the patron saint of psychotherapy. In a certain way, it was personified truth as it arose in his vision of the bearskin-clad pilgrim that was at work in him. His love and warmth was always directed toward the person in front of him, for relationships with individual people are always unique—between one unique person and another. Only within such relationships can our psyche awaken to life and manifest the suprapersonal self. In this way, as the figure of the Christ-berserker shows, a certain inner split within the Self develops into a unity. I am convinced that Brother Klaus, without the berserker figure in the background, would not have been capable of bringing a peaceful end to the Congress of Stans. The berserker was a visible representation of the invisible authority that emanated from him, exercising an influence that made it possible for the hostile parties to put their conflict aside. In this way, Klaus had a greater political effect than any ruler or diplomat. He is a wonderful example of the way in which individuation and collective responsibility can come together. Of course Brother Klaus is a unique example, which we cannot simply imitate. In the inner development of every person, the opposition between individual transformation and social responsibility takes on different forms and shadings. In the first hexagram of the I Ching, “The Creative,” one of the lines is connected with this problem. The line for nine in the fourth place reads: “Wavering flight over the depths. No blame.” In the commentary to this line we find: “A place of transition has been reached, and free choice can enter in. A twofold possibility is presented to the great man: he can soar to the heights and play an important part in the world, or he can withdraw into solitude and develop himself. He can go the way of the hero or that of the holy sage who seeks seclusion. There is no general law to say which of the two is the right way. Each one in this situation must make a free choice according to the inner law of his being. If the individual acts consistently and is true to himself, he will find the way that is appropriate for him. This is right for him and without blame.”17 Compared to such holy sages as Lao Tzu or Chuang Tzu, Brother Klaus as a solitary hermit is a humbler figure. In the first part of his life he took part in all the ordinary activities of life; only when an inner vocation came to him did he abandon the world. To begin with, then, he gave himself with burning fervor to the “imitatio Christi” and practiced Christian brotherly love. But then the berserker came upon him, a deep, introverted, wild longing to follow

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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