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Jung, loc. cit.) and as “a lion of the tribe of Judah” (Rev. 5:5). Thus it would seem that at the end of time a certain shadow aspect of Christ, a shadow aspect that Christ had earlier cast off, will reappear and once again be integrated into his image. When we compare the Church’s image of Christ with the God image of the Old Testament, the traditional Christ figure does not seem to fully embody this God image. Yahweh is on the one hand full of boundless goodness; on the other, however, He shows himself boundlessly cruel in His wrath and vengefulness. By contrast, Christ embodies only the first aspect. It is presumably for this reason that he himself foretold that at the end of the Christian era a countervailing process would bring forth the Antichrist. The demonic ram of the Apocalypse, however, is not a form of the Antichrist, but rather a reincarnated, transfigured, or completed symbol of Christ, in which certain dark and vengeful aspects are integrated rather than splintered off. Perhaps this is a partial return to the Jewish conception of a warlike Messiah, which arose from an anti-Roman resentment. The Christian answer to the knowledge of the good-and-evil double nature of God was, to begin with, one sided: God is exclusively good, and Christ, his incarnation as a human being, is likewise only good. From the year A.D. 1000 on, this symbolic religious solution began to be doubted. The problem of evil forced itself increasingly into the foreground. With regard to this problem, there were two possibilities. The first was the accepted notion that an Antichrist movement would arise and destroy on a gigantic scale all the cultural and moral achievements brought about by Christ. The second possible development was also produced by the unconscious: the idea of completing Christ into a figure that would be both good and evil—a real union of the opposites. In his work, “Answer to Job,”8 Jung put forward the hypothesis that the Apocalypse should be regarded as an expression of this second development. In Revelation 12, there appears “a woman clothed with the sun and the moon under her feet; and upon her head a crown of twelve stars.” While in the throes of labor she is harassed by a dragon. After she has borne a boy, the child is “caught up unto God,” and the woman flees into the desert (Rev. 12:5f.). This seems to be a vision of a kind of rebirth of the Christ figure that is an adumbration of the future of the collective unconscious, an anticipation of a more complete symbol of the self that is no longer split into good and

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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