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comparative religious terms we might call this figure the anthropos to distinguish it from various gods, spirits, and demons, which are more symbolic of particular autonomous impulses in the collective psyche. In contrast to these, the anthropos represents the core aspect of the collective unconscious, which stands specifically for the quality of humanness, including human cultural consciousness. In the development of religious cultural communities, there is clearly a fundamental law at work that brings the periodic disintegration and collapse, then the renewal and recombination, of their constituent elements. In principle, all individual instinctive drives—as for example, the sexual impulse, the aggressive drive for power, or the survival instinct—have both a psychological and a symbolic (that is, psychic or spiritual) side. On the archaic level, these two sides function in very close collaboration. The ritual and bodily activities are one with what they represent. However, in the course of historical development, these two aspects tend to separate. When this happens, the ritual and religious teachings develop into something that is no more than a rigid intellectual formalism, against which the physical instincts then rise in revolt. This conflict situation is necessary for the development of a higher consciousness, but the conflict can also go too far and become destructive. Then a reconciliation of the opposites is needed. Such a situation calls for the recollection (anamnesis) of the primordial human person, the anthropos as the archetype of the total human being, who stands at the core of all the great religions. In the notion of such a homo maximus, the higher and the lower aspects of creation are once again reunited.6 In the Christ-berserker of Klaus’s vision, just such an anthropos figure, which completes the official incomplete image of Christ, spontaneously arises. But this individual vision in which Christ appears as a berserker overflowing with Eros is no isolated image arising in an extraordinary individual. Rather it reaches far into the past and is rooted in an enduring hidden historical context. As Jung has shown, there is within the whole Western Christian culture, with its two-thousand-year-old tradition, an unofficial development of the Christ image. In his work Aion, 7 Jung refers to the fact that in the Revelation of Saint John the Divine (chapters 5 and 6), there appears a lamb with seven horns and seven eyes, a monstrous beast that does not at all resemble the sacrificial lamb associated by tradition with Christ. It is praised as a “bellicose lamb, a conqueror” (Rev. 17:14; see also

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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