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earth. When he cried, the Yellow River and the Yangtse Kiang originated. When he breathed, the wind blew. When he spoke, the thunder rolled. When he cast his gaze about, lightning occurred. If he was in a good mood, the weather was good; when he was out of sorts, it was cloudy. When he died, he fell into pieces, and from his body, the five sacred mountains of China arose: his head became Mount T’ai in the east; his trunk became Mount Sung in the center; his right arm became Heng Mountain in the north; and his left arm became Heng Mountain in the south; and both his feet formed Hua Mountain in the west. His eyes became the sun and the moon.34 As we already saw earlier, the symbolic images related to the individuation process show a tendency to appear in fourfold structures—for example, as the four functions of consciousness or as the four stages of anima or animus development. Thus this quaternity also appears here in connection with P’an Ku. Only under special circumstances does a symbol of the Self manifest in other numeric structures. It manifests naturally as four or further multiples of four: 8, 12, 16, 32, and so on. The motif of sixteen—four times four—is particularly important. In our Western civilization similar ideas about the “cosmic man” have developed surrounding the figure of Adam as the primordial man. A Jewish legend, for example, relates that God, in order to create Adam, gathered red, black, white, and yellow dust from the four corners of the world and that, as a result, Adam reached from one end of the world to the other. When he bent over, his head touched the east and his feet the west. According to another Jewish legend, the souls of the whole human race were contained in Adam from the beginning. His soul was “like the wick of a lamp, wound with countless threads.” This image clearly contains the notion of a unity of all human existence beyond all of the individual components. In this image, the “social” aspect of the Self, which we will speak of later, is also hinted at. The cosmic nature of this “great man” seems to provide a further indication that the inner core of the human soul, that is, the Self, extends far beyond the dimensions of the individual ego, and in truth, we find in observing the unconscious and its manifestations that it possesses dimensions that are impossible to delimit. In ancient Persia, the corresponding primordial man, Gayomart, is described as a gigantic shining figure. When he died, the metals flowed from his body, and from his soul gold originated. His seed fell to earth and

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Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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