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the missal is very different from a real one. The image of the mass is rather to be understood as a symbol, a symbol for a holy service in which the divine principle is present so that human beings can communicate with it. This type of solution is naturally not generally valid but, rather, is an answer on the part of the unconscious to this individual dreamer. It is a typical answer to the religious problem of a Protestant, for a believing member of the Catholic Church experiences his anima in the image of the Church itself and its symbolic images, which for him contain the images of the unconscious. Our dreamer lacked these ecclesiastical symbols and therefore had to travel a purely inner path. The dream provided further hints for him; it told him, “Your mother bond and your extravertedness (represented by his extraverted wife) are distracting you and keeping you through their meaningless gossip from celebrating the inner mass of your psyche. You should follow the nun, who is the introverted anima; as the servant of the mass and a priestess, she can guide you. She has a strange missal made up of sixteen (four times four) ancient pictures. Your mass consists in the contemplation of the psychic images that the religious anima will show you.” If the dreamer could overcome his uncertainty, produced by his mother complex, he would find his life’s task in religious service to the inner images of his psyche. In this dream the anima functions as a mediator between the ego and the Self. The number of four times four pictures indicates that the inner mass is a service to wholeness. As Jung has shown, the inner core of the psyche (the Self) is usually symbolized by fourfold structures. Nonetheless, the number four is also bound up with the anima, because, as Jung showed, there are four stages of realization of the anima.24 The first stage has its clearest mytholical symbol in the figure of Eve, who is an image of purely biological relationship. The second stage is illustrated, for instance, by Faust’s Helena. She symbolizes a romantic and aesthetic form of eros, mixed with sexual elements. The third stage is exemplified by the Virgin Mary, a symbol of spiritualized eros. The fourth stage frequently appears in the form of love personified as Sapientia (Wisdom), since Wisdom, as a lesser partner of the supreme principle, reaches even further than love. Another image for this last stage is the Shulamite in the Song of Songs. She embodies a stage of development only seldom reached by modern humanity.

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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