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for it was in the Greece of those times that the development of the European scientific intellect began. The saga shows us that if we think we can solve the problem of the unconscious psyche and of eros with this kind of intellect alone, we are falling prey to a disastrous illusion. The anima manifests with particular frequency as erotic fantasy, with the result that many men are compulsively driven to ogle women’s beautiful curves or to dwell on them in films, magazines, or striptease shows, or else alone in daydreams. This primitively aesthetic and purely nature-related aspect of the anima usually only becomes compulsive when a man remains infantile in the domain of eros.22 All these aspects of the anima have the same tendency as the shadow—to project themselves on an external person, so that they appear to the man as the properties of a real woman. It is also this process of projection that causes a man suddenly to fall head over heels in love and to feel at the first meeting, “That’s her!” as though he had always known this woman to the core. He then often becomes so helplessly enthralled with her that it seems to an outsider like pure madness. Especially women with a certain vague “elfish” quality attract such anima projections onto themselves, because as a consequence of their vagueness, men can impute all possible qualities to them. Such sudden passionate attractions brought about by the anima upset many marriages and frequently create the well-known triangle situation with all its afflictions. A tolerable solution can be found in such situations only if the anima is recognized as an inner power. It even seems to correspond to a hidden intention of the unconscious to bring about such chaotic situations in order to ripen the personality of the man and to force him to integrate more of his inner unconscious personality.23 But enough of the negative side of the anima—after all, it has just as many positive aspects as negative ones. The anima makes a man able to find “the right woman,” and beyond that, to distinguish in the half-light of the unconscious, where his understanding does not fully penetrate, the contents that are of value to him from those that are not. But even of more practical importance for his life, this attunement to the right contents opens up the way into his own depths. It is as though an inner radio receiver were tuned to a particular wavelength on which he received none of the nonsense described above, but only the voice of the great man. With this, the anima attains the

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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