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experience of an entire lifetime, and these can be gotten at more clearly by using a mythical tale rather than one individual dream. When dark figures appear in our dreams and demand some-thing of us, we cannot at once be sure whether they are the embodiment of shadow parts of ourselves or of the Self or perhaps of both at the same time. Being able to tell whether this dark other represents a failing that we should overcome or a vital element that we should accept is one of the most difficult problems that we meet on the path of individuation. It feels like a divine act of grace when a dream provides a clear answer to this; but often the dream symbols themselves are so complicated that one gets tangled up trying to interpret them. In such situations there is no choice but to endure the torment of moral uncertainty, to the extent possible to avoid making any definitive decisions and faithfully observe our further dreams. This resembles the situation Cinderella found herself in when the evil stepmother tossed her a heap of good and bad peas and then, though it seemed hopeless, patiently began to sort them. Doves (and in other versions of the fairy tale, the ants) unexpectedly came to her aid. These latter symbolize helpful thoughts arising from a loving attitude and deep unconscious stirrings that can be felt almost only with the body, that are capable of showing the right way. Somewhere in the deepest part of the psyche, we usually already know what direction things are going in, but very often the buffoon we call the ego sets up such a racket that the inner voice cannot be heard. When despite all attempts to explore the inner indications we still cannot achieve insight, sometimes there is nothing left but, “in God’s name,” to come up with the courage to make a responsible decision—of course while still maintaining an inner readiness to change course if at last, after all, the unconscious provides signs that point in another direction. Of course situations do arise, though rarely, in which it is better to resist the will of the unconscious psyche absolutely and bear the negative consequences of this rather than deviate from the ethos of humanity. This is the case, for example, when a person would have to act out a criminal aspect of his makeup in order to realize himself completely. Sometimes it seems as though the Self wants the ego to make a free choice—or perhaps also the Self depends for its realization on human consciousness and its decisions. Jung was able to show in his works that in the human psyche, often two “moral” powers are at work: the collective moral code (the Freudian

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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