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without further processing. The many passages and the large house in the dream also show that the dreamer does not yet know the full range of his personality. The shadow in this sample dream is typical for an introvert, that is, for a person who tends to be too withdrawn from external life. In the case of an extravert, a person more attuned to the external world, the shadow would look a lot different. For example, a young man had the following dream. He was a person who as a result of his lively temperament repeatedly let himself get carried away with external busyness and work in pursuit of success in his career, despite the fact that his dreams kept insisting on his completing some private creative work he had undertaken: A man is lying on a couch and has covered himself up with the blanket. He is a Frenchman, a desperado who is willing to do anything. An official is conducting me out of an office and down a flight of stairs. There is a plot against me. The Frenchman is supposed to kill me as though by accident. And in fact he is following us to the exit. I am on my guard. A large, imposing man (prominent, rich, influential) collapses against the right wall right next to me. He is feeling ill. I make use of this opportunity to kill the official by stabbing him in the heart with lightning speed. “You feel only a little dampness,” something says, as though by way of commentary. Now I am free, for the Frenchman obviously is not going to do anything now that the man who hired him is out of the way. (Probably the official and the large man are the same figure; that is, the latter replaces the former.) The desperado represents the dreamer’s “other side,” the introvert in him, who has nothing to lose. That he is lying on a couch covered by a blanket shows that he is looking for passivity, solitude, and introversion. The official and the successful man who are secretly identical symbolize the outer efforts for success mentioned above as well as external obligations. The collapse of the successful man is a reference to the fact that the dreamer had often fallen sick when he had become too dynamically outerdirected. This is seen in the fact that this successful man obviously has no blood, only a little water in his veins, which shows that the external attempts at success no longer contain any genuine life. For this reason, there is no great loss in stabbing him. The desperado is contented in the end, for he is really a positive shadow, who only became negative because he was provoked by the inappropriate conscious attitude of the dreamer.

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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