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completely unaware of, as well as exits that led into other cellars (or maybe subterranean streets?). It made me feel uneasy to find that some of these exits were unlocked and some of them had no lock at all. Laborers were working on a job in the neighborhood, and one of them could have slipped in completely unnoticed. . . . After going back up to the ground floor, I crossed a courtyard, where once again I found exits to the outside and into other houses. I was just about to have a closer look at them when a man who was laughing loudly walked toward me across the courtyard and called out that we were old acquaintances (from primary school?). Then I remembered this too. As he was telling me about his life, I went outside with him, and we strolled aimlessly through the streets. A strange chiaroscuro light lay over the scene as we were walking along an immense ring road. Just as we arrived at a large expanse of grass, three horses galloped by us, wonderfully powerful wild animals, who nevertheless looked to be very well cared for. There were no riders and no one was leading them. (Could they be runaways? From the army?) The tangle of unknown passages and unlocked doors in the cellar recalls the depictions of the underworld of the ancient Egyptians;13 it is an image of the unconscious and its unknown possibilities. It also shows how in the domain of the shadow one is exposed to alien influences, which can infiltrate secretly. In the back court—an as yet unknown psychic space of the dreamer’s—his old school friend crops up, obviously an aspect of the dreamer himself, which he knew as a child and has forgotten in the meantime. Often qualities someone had as a child (such as joie de vivre, a violent temper, or also naiveté) can disappear in the course of his development, and it is surely such a lost side of the dreamer that reappears here and tries to join him—presumably in this case, it is his extraverted joie de vivre. We also soon learn why he feels fear toward such a harmless figure: when he is taking a stroll with his school friend, horses gallop by, perhaps from the military—which means from the discipline of consciousness. Since the horses have no riders, it is clear that they are instincts that have not been mastered by the ego. And yet this old friend, who brings danger with him, represents the life that is missing in his consciousness. Such a problem often arises in the encounter with “the other side.” The shadow often contains important elements that consciousness is lacking, but in a form that does not allow them to be incorporated in the conscious sphere

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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