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it.” This means a wild animal that has invaded the cultivated fields. The commentary connects it with the enemy and also with a wild lack of discipline in one’s own army, which must be overcome. We find the same idea in more detail in hexagram twenty-six of the I Ching, which as an image has heaven, the creative, below, and the mountain, keeping still, above. This is a sign that describes how creative force begins to establish itself on the collective level. The fourth line of this hexagram says: “The headboard of a young bull. Great good fortune”; and the fifth line: “The tusk of a gelded boar. Good fortune.” The commentary advises that “a good way to restrain wild force is to forestall it.” It also says, “where men are concerned, wild force should not be combated directly; instead its roots should be eradicated.” So here also what is being talked about is preventing a destructive psychic outburst through a creative grasp of unconscious forces. Karl Schmid, in his essay “Über Aspekte des Bösen im Schöpferischen” (Evil Aspects of the Creative),26 pointed out that the fashionable word “creative” is nowadays mostly used in a positive sense, whereas in the past it tended to signify something revolutionary, subversive, and dangerous, and that a development of this dangerous notion of creativity via Romanticism and Nietzsche had led to Nazism. Since that time it has become fashionable for destructive collective movements to write “creativity” on their banners as a pretext or excuse for the wholesale overthrow of order. Schmid postulates that the state, as the preserver of order, should always relate conservatively to the kind of creativity that degenerates into collective movements. He ends his presentation with the following words: The unrest of individuals in cultures may perhaps be a stirring of nature. For collective unrest, according to the law creativity is no alibi. The nature of the state demands that it affirm the law, otherwise it loses its meaning and value. The individual languishes and becomes incapable of performing his tasks if he merely steers blindly according to collective signals of Left and Right, forbidding and allowing. When, however, the collective discredits that act of stabilizing and clarifying that is the epitome of law and no longer permits itself to be guided by it, it is shattered overnight. The individual needs an undisturbed connection with the unconscious in order to remain creative. But what does the collective need? It needs everything that the Enlightenment sought—unceasing heightening of consciousness, ever stronger acknowledgment of justice, law, and consensus. For the

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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