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of Aaron, which unexpectedly blossomed.19 As Jung showed, when the quaternity motif occurs in a dream, it points to an all-embracing consciousness of the individual, to the greatest possible realization of his inner wholeness, which in the background is what his life is aiming at. For the totality of a human life reveals a kind of central pattern or meaning, which ego consciousness, subsisting only in the moment, rarely glimpses as a whole yet still somehow senses. Thus Winston Churchill is said always to have felt that he would one day have something great to do for England, and trusting in that, he ventured into the fray. When in the most critical of circumstances the fate of England was placed in his hands, he knew that this had been the meaning of his life from the beginning. In such moments a kind of certainty breaks through—one simply knows that one has to do this thing or that. This phenomenon is not particularly rare: many people from all levels of society have experienced such moments in their lives. Before the First World War, there was even a medal in the Austrian army that was only awarded to someone who had acted against orders and in this way brought about a favorable turn in the battle. If it went wrong, he was shot; but if the outcome was good, he received this order, which, significantly, was instituted by a woman, Maria Theresa. For this individual had not only served the rational organizational apparatus of the army but had also, as though following the goddess Nike, followed his feeling-based knowledge of destiny. Today we easily permit ourselves to be blinded by rational statistical calculations and fall victim to the idea of big numbers. Nonetheless it is often also possible for a single individual to turn the tide of a collective situation. We can never say in advance with certainty that the statistically computed majority is the only possible winner. Sometimes an entire battle can be lost through a single officer’s moment of inattention. In advance we never know into whose hands such a turn of fate will play; only in historical retrospect do we see that sometimes suddenly a certain insignificant Mr. X, without knowing it himself, had the whole situation in his hands. And this is where the unconscious comes into play: just as the functioning of consciousness suddenly lapses in an individual when an unconscious complex is activated, in the same way in a military organization, which pretty well corresponds to a system of consciousness, the unconscious lapse of a single person, or his positive act, can bring about a change of fate of the greatest collective

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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