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and I and your husband, the golden stag, are saved.” 95. Cf. Jung’s remarks on this in “Answer to Job,” in CW 11, paras. 564ff., pp. 367ff. 96. Ibid., paras. 583ff., pp. 376ff. 97. This motif reminds us more of the Paradise story, where also a childish curiosity on the part of humanity was punished with tragic disproportion. 98. See Helmut Jakobsohn, “Conversation of a World-Weary Man with his Ba,” in Timeless Documents of the Soul (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press). 99. Zurich, 1941, p. 152f. This is a magical gesture that is even more archaic than the sacrifice or the Saturnalia customs, something, however, that seems connected with the more ancient roots of these; cf. Renner, Goldener Ring über Uri (Zurich, 1941), p. 154. 100. He protects himself from the bad consequences of panic, and he also protects the “it” from getting involved in a prestige struggle with a human being. 101. This is by no means to be confused with sticking one’s head in the sand and repressive unwillingness to see what is there, for after all, the denial was preceded in the fairy tale by an act of knowledge (opening the chamber). Rather it is as though the girl, who now knows the nature of the black woman, wanted to spare her the pain of feeling seen through in the midst of her suffering with her own shadow. 102. Note also that Jung stresses that loyalty and constancy (as emotional values) are of crucial importance in Job’s behavior. 103. Edited by R. Wilhelm (Jena, 1923), vol. 1, chap. 2. 104. Cf. B. Hannah, “The Problem of Women’s Plots,” in The Evil Vineyard (Gould Pastoral Psychology Lectures, no. 51, 1948); and E. Neumann, Zur Psychologie des Weiblichen (The Psychology of the Feminine) (Zurich, 1953), pp. 107–109 (Amor and Psyche). 105. When I speak of Christianity in this sense, I am referring less to its dogmatic and theological tenets than to the collective Christian popular outlook. 106. The time-related quality of the myth becomes clear most easily through considering for a moment the difference between this mother-daughter

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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