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Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, CW 14, p. 170. 81. There are variants of the fairy tale (see above footnote) according to which not a woman but rather an unredeemed male figure appears, a spiritual content which in our version only resonates in the magic or the women’s book reading. This animus figure in need of redemption would be identical with the groom in our tale. These variants reflect a much less deep-seated animus problematic, which is why I give them less attention here. In “The Green Maiden,” it is two figures: the green maiden and her consort, a golden stag, who is identical with the man who later becomes the girl’s husband. 82. In the following remarks I must presume familiarity with the problematic of the animus and therefore refer the reader to the fundamental essay of Emma Jung, “Essay on the Problem of the Animus,” in Animus and Anima (Analytical Psychology Club of New York, 1957). Emma Jung speaks in detail about this unconscious spirituality, that is, animus activity in the woman, ibid., pp. 319f.: “Where the man grapples with problems, the woman amuses herself with solving puzzles, where he attains knowledge, the woman is content with belief or superstition or makes exceptions. . . . So-called wishful thinking also corresponds to a certain level of spiritual development. This exists as a fairy-tale motif, often characterizing a past time when this functioned, ‘at a time when wishing still used to work.’ . . . Grimm points out . . . the connection between wishing and thinking: . . . ‘Wishing is the measuring, outpouring, giving, creative force; the constructive, imagining, thinking force; thus also imagination, idea, image, form.’ And elsewhere: significantly, in Sanskrit wish is manoratha, ‘the wheel of the mind’; wishing turns the wheel of thoughts.” Cf. further on the connection between wishful thinking and synchronicity phenomena (magic), C. G. Jung and W. Pauli, Natureklärung und Psyche (Natural Explanation and Psyche) (Zurich, 1952); and C. G. Jung, “Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle,” in CW 8, para. 956. On the boy as a symbol for a woman’s own developing masculine component, cf. Emma Jung, “Essay on the Problem of the Animus,” p. 29. 83. Cf. C. G. Jung, Seminare über Kinderträume, pp. 220f. See also “A

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