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unconscious. The latter are in turn subdivided into: (3) constellations occasioned by conscious contents; and (4) constellations occasioned by unconscious productive processes. Certain dreams seem to have no direct relationship to consciousness, but rather represent, inter alia, reactions to psychic or physical environmental conditions, or are derived from purely creative processes in the unconscious. Cf. “A Seminar with C. G. Jung: Comments on a Child’s Dream,” trans. E. H. Henley, in Spring (Zurich: Analytical Psychology Club of New York, 1974), pp. 200–23. 9. Psychology and Alchemy, CW 12, Introduction. 10. Taurus, Aries, Pisces; cf. C. G. Jung, Aion, CW 9/ii, passim. 11. For instance, it is possible to observe changes in the rites and myths of the American Indians that can be understood as unconscious reactions to the invasion of the whites. Similarly, we can discern in Greek mythology the reaction to the pre-Greek Mediterranean culture; or in Jewish myth, the reaction to the Exile; and here we are not merely talking about influences that can be understood in cultural-historical terms, but about unconscious, psychic reactions that have taken on symbolic expression. 12. Although each archetype represents an unknown, nevertheless we can speak empirically of the archetype of the Divine Child or of the Wise Old Man or the Great Mother; that is, we can characterize individual structural elements of the unconscious in a relative manner as functionally definite units. 13. The analogy with the particle and wave nature of light is obvious. 14. “Most distant” is meant here in the sense of “on the average rarely connected, but on the contrary more usually contrasted.” 15. See Figure 4. 16. In the following tale, for example, two separate mother figures appear, of which at the end one is revealed as positive, and the other is burned as a witch. The movement of the story contrasts the two, but amplification of the figures shows their hidden identity. Thus the figures are both identical and not identical. In other words, the movement of the tale specifically isolates certain aspects of an archetype, which comparative consideration (amplification) brings together. This contradiction is explained by the fact that the movement of the story represents an individual case, whereas amplification proceeds statistically, that is, by

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Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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