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under consideration, this aspect of the problem does not seem to be acute, that is, the young king has already begun to rule, and this assures a proper continuation of the spiritual order. By contrast, however, in the realm of the feminine, that is, of the anima and the feminine mode of life—and thus of course in the area of eros and relationships of feeling—a critical transformation is brewing. This announces itself first in the realm of consciousness in the form of dreams, which force the young king to find and marry the girl, that is, to open himself to an unexpected emotional experience. His hunters find the girl, and with the brevity and simplicity so characteristic of fairy tales, he rescues her and without further ado brings her home with him as his wife. The girl gets out of her critical situation so suddenly and effortlessly that we involuntarily fear ex post facto difficulties. Considering matters from the girl’s side, we must see this elevation to queenhood as somehow connected with, if not a direct consequence of, her having looked into the forbidden chamber—as though it was precisely through this that she brought her extraordinary destiny on herself. Through this she was raised out of the anonymity of the ordinary collective life into the center,77 and on top of it became a symbolic individual, whom all look up to as a guiding image. From amplifications we know that she always was this already, but the fairy tale portrays the turning point in which this content became visible. Seen from the point of view of the psychology of a woman, the young king would represent a collective animus figure, and becoming connected with him would mean that through her isolation in the forest cave,78 the girl had achieved a spiritual connection with the collective consciousness. While— from the point of view of the realm of the archetypes—the psychic content reflected in the girl sinks into darkness, conversely, looked at from the point of view of the sphere of human consciousness, it arises out of the unconscious collective psyche onto the surface, where unexpectedly it suddenly becomes visible. “Immortal: mortal; mortal: immortal; for the life of the former is the death of the latter, and the life of the latter is the death of the former,” says Heraclitus.79 Here he is certainly alluding to the fact that the archetypes (immortals) must be diminished if they are to be realized within the human realm, and conversely, that a human being is burst apart if he or she is assimilated by an archetype.80 The expulsion of the girl from the castle in the forest and her elevation to queenhood is therefore, from a

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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