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done to her, namely, to close her in and put her under a spell. In this way the unredeemed condition of the black woman is extended in part to the girl. The one archetype infects the other, which is expressed in the fact that now the girl in her little room can do magic just like the witch herself, since all the wishes she makes in this room come true. On the human level, this means that the girl acquires the imaginatio vera, in and through which the psychically real becomes real altogether, but which demands by way of compensation an objectification and thus a delimitation of her individuality.47 This is the so-called active imagination, which can indeed, when misused for the goals of ego, become black magic, but which applied consciously can bring the possibility of self-knowledge and a coming to consciousness par excellence.48 The transference of the ability to create reality by imagination from the black woman to the girl signifies that an archetype that is especially energetically charged, and therefore highly constellated, is particularly bent on making itself visible in the human realm through synchronicity phenomena; that is, on manifesting not only on an inner psychic level but also as coincidences in the configuration of outer conditions. This particular intensity in the way things appear is what is transferred to the girl in the castle, and indeed in a specific “little room.” Could it be that this is ultimately related to the intrusion of an archetype into the time-space continuum and the “shrinking” of the archetype that is conditioned by this? From the mythological point of view, the castle is a symbol of the mother-anima or of the feminine Self and is especially connected with the psyche’s way of relating to this central content, for it is a form created by the human hand.49 But we shall examine this aspect in greater detail later on. The bewitched atmosphere of the castle once again removes its owner from the framework of a nature goddess, who would be more likely to dwell in the forest itself, in water, or in heaven. By contrast to that, the castle points to the past cultural framework of this figure when it was closer to consciousness and had not yet, as now, sunk back into the unconscious. The fact that the cultural framework of the figure is that of the past perhaps points to magic, which is an inheritance from pre-Christian culture, an inheritance that was preserved into the Middle Ages as a form of knowledge but then came more and more to be ignored—in other words, the forest again grew over the castle and hid it.

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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