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totality, the Self (and nearly every living religion does do this), does not or does not sufficiently acknowledge some particular empiricallypsychologically demonstrable aspect of the Self. Thus the archetype of wholeness or totality is inadequately accommodated on the human level and is unable to carry out all of its functions. In the initial situation of the present fairy tale, as already pointed out, the mother image is conspicuously missing; however, we should postpone for the moment drawing cultural-historical conclusions from this. In a poor farm family with lots of children that is lacking a mother, it is natural for the oldest girl to be charged with the role of filling in as the father’s companion and the children’s mother. Thus it is by no means an accident that it is the destiny of the girl in this story to have to come to terms with a primal image of the feminine so as to be able to discover her own nature. If we look at this as a personal situation, we can say that such a girl could very easily develop a father complex, and this fits with parallel versions in which the girl is brought to a crisis through the father’s erotic advances.33 If, however, one remembers that this “wench” is not a human individual, we must formulate the situation in more exact terms as follows: The girl represents a Kore, an archetypal component of the collective unconscious, whose tendency is to transform the archetype of the mother and the feminine and to constellate it in an entirely different way. This figure also reflects at the same time an anima need of the unconscious psyche of countless men and the tendency toward individuation in innumerable women. As a feminine being, she is capable of personifying a new form of eros and emotional relatedness in and through which the image of the “black woman”—whatever that may signify—can be redeemed as a psychic function. The fact that the story stems from a milieu of poor anonymous folk—the “wench” in this version does not even have a name34—suggests that the problem of the redemption of the dark mother was not constellated in the first instance on the level of the predominant culture, but rather was constellated in the psyche of natural, simple folk as a psychic need, and that the search for something missing that is implied in it arose from the “inferior,” “lower” level in people. Only when the girl becomes queen does the problem develop anything like the potential for becoming conscious on the collective level. Though in this version the father intentionally indentures his daughter to

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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