Page 167

After eight days she took the girl off with her to a castle in the forest and showed her to a little room right next to the entrance. The black woman told her that if in that room she thought of anything she wanted, that thing would immediately appear before her. She also gave her the keys to the house, which had a hundred rooms. Each day the child was to sweep and tidy up one of the rooms, all except for the hundredth. “If in three years,” the black woman said, “you haven’t gone into the forbidden room, your fortune will be made.” At first the “wench” followed these instructions, but fourteen days before the end of the three years, she could no longer contain her curiosity, and she unlocked the hundredth room. There she saw “the woman inside; but she was already completely white except for the tips of her toes, which were still black.” Quickly the girl slammed the door shut and ran to her room, but the woman was already there, and she asked her if she had been in the hundredth room. In spite of the black woman’s horrifying threats, the girl lied steadfastly and said she hadn’t been there. Then suddenly she was in the middle of a wild forest, wretchedly dressed and with nothing to eat and nothing to drink. “There she stayed for a while.” Nearby in the royal capital, the young king was dreaming that he should get up, go hunting, and whatever he found, he should love like himself. When the dream had repeated for the third time, he finally obeyed. His hunters found the girl in a cave, the king fell in love with her, brought her home, and soon made her his wife. A year later she gave birth to a wonderfully beautiful little boy. But the third night after that, unexpectedly, the black woman came to her and said, “Now you are queen. You have your child, and now I am asking you, were you in the hundredth room?” “No, no,” said the young queen. “I’ll take your child away, and you’ll go deaf.” Still the queen kept up her denial. The black woman disappeared with the child, and the queen went deaf. This happened twice more. Again and yet again the black woman took a child, and the queen also became dumb and blind. For a long time already, the king’s mother had been angry; now she persuaded the king that his wife was a witch and child murderer. And after the third disappearance of a child, the king heeded her and condemned his wife to be burned at the stake. She was already at the stake and the fire was about to be lit when all of a sudden a black wagon came driving up, in which sat the black woman, holding the three children. She approached the queen and said, “Now I’m asking you

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Advertisement