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beautiful princess, who had until then brought about the destruction of all of her suitors. She set them the task of hiding from her three times. If she could find them, their life was forfeit, but if not, she was to yield to the man. The hunter took up the challenge and hid himself with the help of the fish in the deepest depth of the ocean, but the princess possessed a magic mirror. She looked into it and saw the hunter on the ocean floor. Then he flew with the eagle to the highest height of heaven, but there too the princess’s magic mirror found him. Now it was a matter of life and death. The hunter called the fox for help, and the fox dug a subterranean burrow right up to beneath the princess’s throne. The hunter, on the fox’s advice, crept into it, and as she was trying to see him in her magic mirror, from beneath her he stuck her in the bottom with a needle. She dropped the mirror and yielded to the hunter, who courted her and became the king of the country.3 Help comes neither from escape into the depths of the sea, that is, the unconscious, nor escape into the sphere of the intellect (the eagle’s flight). Both are forms of escape that many men try: some abscond into the realm of fantasy or into an extramarital relationship that is kept hidden; others escape into the intellect, that is, they bury themselves in newspapers, books, political theorizing—all realms where the evil woman apparently cannot follow. But this is of no help; only the animal of the earth, the ground of reality, helps; to wit, the fox, who is famous for his realistic shrewdness. He is an animal of Dionysus and Wotan, also in mythology often a diabolical spirit. With his help, the hunter succeeds in pricking the “weak point,” the vulnerable complex of the nasty woman, presumably her power complex, for it is with this—her bottom—that she sits on the throne! Touché, she has to yield, and we may hope that with this the “taming of the shrew” has come to pass. This fairy tale also clearly illustrates in what way women most frequently illegitimately dominate a man—not by force but through superior cunning. In our fairy tale, this is the magical mirror in which the princess sees everything. In practical terms this means the following: When the man wants to undertake something that does not suit her, the woman does not say that, but at that particular moment, she gets sick. Or when she notices that her man likes other people, men or women, with real feeling, she fears that this might draw him out of her power. Then in advance, long before he has noticed what is going on, she lets slip poison-tipped, slanderous remarks, which nip the

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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