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psychic beauty and higher consciousness begin to shine through, and the prince begins by moments to glimpse her true higher nature behind her contrariness. In true feminine fashion, however, she compels him to find her rather than pushing herself on him. Indeed, judging by the verse she speaks, she remains turned only toward the inner light of her own growth to consciousness, fleeing before the darkness of unconsciousness and the animus affects, until the prince finds her true nature. Through this she reaches her due position of queen, that is, of an individuated, fully developed woman. She gives the prince to understand in a few biting and haughty remarks how discourteously he has behaved, but she takes no revenge, for where real love and a genuine relationship of feeling prevails, no further competitive selfaffirmation is necessary. One can reach an understanding in a human and completely ordinary fashion through words or often just little innuendoes. Humor, that single divine quality of humanity, as Schopenhauer once called it, is the bridge of genuinely human and friendly “self-affirmation” between partners. Now let us turn to the problem of the man who has to affirm himself vis-àvis a woman. Here the situation is entirely different, for because of his physical superiority and traditional legal situation, at least in our patriarchally shaped religion and culture, the problem ostensibly does not exist at all. If a man is not a Milquetoast but a real man, then he knows instinctively what he has to do to defend himself against a feminine power play. If he does not know, then usually it is because his mother has craftily castrated him through a “good upbringing,” that is, taught him that he has to subordinate himself like a good boy to the woman. When it falls to one to help such men, what it comes down to is reminding them of their inborn genuine manhood and giving them some backbone. That means that they will have to become less noble and mannerly and let their darker, animal, shadow side come out. For many very fine and sensitive men this can be quite difficult, but it must happen, if they are not to become the disdained patsy of some power-hungry woman or her animus. There is a Greek fairy tale that illustrates this particularly well. A hunter went out and caught a fish, but in response to its plea he set it free. It then gave him one of its scales, which he was to rub when he was in trouble. Then he caught an eagle, and again the same thing happened. He spared him and received a feather. Thirdly, he spared a fox and received from it a hair and its promise to help him. Now he came to the court of a

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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