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afflicted woman. Jung called these components animus (in the woman) and anima (in the man). The situation becomes even more complicated because in general the man cannot tolerate this second-class masculinity in the woman and the woman cannot tolerate this dubious femininity in the man, and they react to them with automatic irritability. As a result, each time a confrontation develops in connection with the self-affirmation of one or the other, these two components almost always become mixed up in the discussion and draw it down to a lower, irritable level. Through this, unintentional hurting of feelings comes about, which are afterward often difficult to heal, and the whole confrontation goes astray and ends up in a dead end. Thus when a woman feels she needs to assert herself in some respect vis-à-vis the man, she finds herself face to face with the problem of a “two-front war”—against the man, on one hand, and against her own animus, which spoils her plan, on the other. The same problem also faces the man. Since this is an age-old, general human problem, it has been reflected symbolically in myths and fairy tales, and because it is impossible for me to depict a great number of individual cases in a fully factual manner, I would like to present two such mythical tales in which everything essential is expressed in a concentrated manner. The first tale, which relates to the problem as it comes up for a woman, is a Norwegian Cinderella variant with the title “Kari Woodenskirt.”2 Once upon a time there was a king who had lost his wife and had married, as his second wife, a widow with a daughter. She, however, was evil and hated the king’s only and beautiful daughter Kari. The king had to leave the country to go to war, and the girl, in order to escape the persecutions of her stepmother, had to flee to the cattle on the meadow. There she became friends with a blue bull, who spoke to her in human language, promising her consolation and help. From his ear, she could pull a little cloth on which rich dishes of food appeared, from which she nourished herself. Then the stepmother decided to have the bull slaughtered, and Kari made up her mind to escape far way on the blue bull’s back. They came to a wood, whose trees all bore copper leaves, and the bull asked Kari not to touch or pick any of them. But unintentionally she did so all the same, and a three-headed troll appeared, and a fight to the death ensued between the troll and the bull, in which the latter, exhausted, barely prevailed. Now they came to a wood whose trees bore silver leaves, and again the

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

Marie - Louise Von Franz - Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche -  

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