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PRIMAL ASSETS

or betrayal of trust than are other kinds of substitutions. By way of contrast, the data showed that consumers viewed Pepsi as a Jester— an identity that shed light on why that brand, over time, was allowed to be changeable, and why it always is at its best when it goodnaturedly pokes fun at sanctimonious Coke. Because BAV is a longitudinal study conducted over an extended period, we also were able to explore how brands’ archetypal identities have evolved, for good or for ill. For example, we conducted a BAV archetype analysis to try to diagnose why a leading brand of apparel was losing both sales and cultural prominence. The data revealed that, as recently as 1997, the brand was viewed strongly and consistently as a “Hero” across all age groups from 15 to 50⫹, as shown in the following table: Apparel Brand’s 1997 Index on the Hero Archetype Age: 15–17 18–29 30–49 50+

100.12 101.12 102.55 95.41

Just two years later, the brand’s Hero identity plummeted within only one group—unfortunately, the most important one, in terms of both its current “cultural cachet” and its future vitality: teenagers. The 1999 figures are shown in the following table: Apparel Brand’s 1999 Index on the Hero Archetype Age: 15–17 18–29 30–49 50+

33.62 104.00 101.06 104.72

The Y&R Team concluded that the brand needed to reclaim its tough, competent, Heroic image and interpret it for a new generation. While the case studies always were dramatic and insightful, the most powerful test of the archetypal theory would need to go far

Profile for Lewis Lafontaine

Mack, Margaret - Hero and Outlaw Archetype  

Mack, Margaret - Hero and Outlaw Archetype  

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