Issuu on Google+


CONTENTS:

LEFTOVERS

project type: reclamation

CERNER CENTER

project type: regional and community planning

SWITZER NEIGHBORHOOD FARM project type: pro bono

BNIM INTERNSHIP MASTERS REPORT

project type: research and participatory design


LE FTOVE RS DENVER, COLORADO PROFESSOR JESSICA CANFIELD LAR 648: MILE HIGH WATER

Estimates indicate by 2050 there will be a 20% gap between water supply and demand in the South Platte River Basin. Adequate water storage along Colorado’s Front Range is of primary concern. One storage strategy, currently in use, are gravel lakes. Gravel lakes are the reclaimed byproduct of open pit gravel mining. Current gravel pit reclamation methods -- line the sides with an impermeable membrane, fill with water, and enclose with a perimeter fence -- provide little social, environmental, and economic value. Using the idea of a Continuous Productive Urban Landscape as a framework (Viljoen, 2005), the new gravel lakes system will: increase water storage capacity, boost groundwater recharge, connect adjacent habitat patches/ existing land reserves, intensify regional biodiversity, implement local agriculture, and include a variety of passive and active recreation opportunities. (right) The continuous productive urban landscape reclaims rejected landscapes while infusing social equity.

PROJECT TYPE: TOOLS:

RECLAMATION GIS, GOOGLE EARTH, ADOBE PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR, AND INDESIGN

WATER + ECO


*

COLORADO

SOUTH PLATTE RIVER BASIN

ADAMS COUNTY

E BROOMFIELD

17 MILES

LOGY + FOOD = LIFE

BRIGHTON

COMMERCE CITY TO BRIGHTON

COMMERCE CITY

E ARVADA

DENVER LAKEWOOD

(above) The proposed gravel lake storage network extends 17 miles from Commerce City to Brighton.


3

NEW RECLAMATION TECHNIQUES


D E S I G N S T R AT E G I E S

+ 4 , 0 0 0 ACR E S AQUIFER RECHARGE BASINS

+1 , 0 0 0 ACR E S FLOOD PLAIN WETLAND ZONES

WAT E R +2 , 0 0 0 ACR E S LAND CONSERVATION ZONES

+10 , 0 0 0 ACR E S FOOD PRODUCTION ZONES

(left) New reclamation practices promote groundwater recharge. (right) Site systems under the three categories Water, Ecology, and Food framed design strategies for the gravel lake chain.

N DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE

E CO LO G Y

FOOD


CERNER CENTER K ANSAS CIT Y, MISSOURI P R O FE S S O R S B L A K E B E L A N G E R , JASON BRODY, AND HOWARD HAHN LAR 646: CIT Y ECOLOGIES

Public-private partnerships will revitalize Kansas City’s downtown core by developing a strong foundation for future businesses and improving quality of life for city dwellers. Densifying the area south of the I-670 cap will generate connections to activity centers. In addition, multimodal transit opportunities and linear civic spaces will increase both citizens’ and businesses’ investment in the community and downtown area. Kansas City is currently home to three Fortune 500 companies, two of which are located in Overland Park, an outlying suburb. Since many of Kansas City’s businesses are opting to locate in the suburbs, the downtown must establish a low-risk environment to entice business investment. A successful corporate center will double the downtown population while maintaining a high quality of life.

(right) Primary and secondary pedestrian corridors reconnect the downtown core and the crossroads district.

PROJECT TYPE: TEAM: TOOLS:

COMMUNITY PLANNING CAMMIE CHRISNTER AND ANNE HUNDLEY PEN AND INK, GIS, ADOBE PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR, AND INDESIGN, SKETCHUP


(above) The team envisioned a network of green roofs at the onset of the project.


civic corridors funnel pedestrian traffic from major cultural centers

(above) This diagram illustrates the fusion of four team projects from the City Ecologies studio.

understanding civic space through building massing scenarios (left) Quick massing studies generated civic corridors and land use strategies. (right) Residential green roofs improve quality of urban living in downtown Kansas City.


SWITZE R FARM K ANSAS CIT Y, MISSOURI PROFESSORS JESSICA CANFIELD AND LEE SKABELUND L A R 410 : P L A N T I N G D E S I G N

Located in Westside neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, the Switzer Neighborhood Farm is home to an economically diverse population and resides on a brownfield. An abandoned school flanks two sides of the site, and a library and community center are directly adjacent. Switzer Neighborhood Farm has very limited funding and no direct access to the water system for irrigation. The design of the Switzer Neighborhood Farm has three elements that lead to a rich Westside communitiy: multifunctionalism, educational opportunities, and biodiversity. The site hosts a variety of special events and daily educational experiences, bringing in a large, diverse crowd from the neighborhood. Children and seniors alike can participate in gardening, and a mentor program connects these two age groups.

(right) The community center at the base of the south slope promotes gathering, education, and play.

PROJECT TYPE: TEAM: TOOLS:

PRO BONO CAMMIE CHRISTNER ADOBE PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR, AND INDESIGN


(right) Children in the Westside Community attend 29 different schools. The average fourth grader has a vocabulary of 1,000 words, compared to a 10,000 word vocabulary of a fourth grader from Johnson County, southwest of Westside.

715 students in K-12 schools 627 students in public K-12 schools 88 students in private K-12 schools

71 students continue to undergraduate colleges

7

students continue to graduate or professional colleges

= 10 students (approximately)


onions

14,500

peppers

5,625

tomatoes

12,500

corn

3,750

AnnualWaterRequirements ForGardenPlants

WaterRequirementpernumberofPlanters

Typeof Plant

40Planters

(NumberofRainBarrels) 50Planters 60Planters

70Planters


(above) The butterfly garden requires four components to attract butterflies: sources of water, rocks to rest on and sunbathe, scaly bark, and nectar. (left) Water requirements for common garden vegetables (and other numerical data concerning precipitation) was equated to basketballs to enhance community understanding. (right) By centralizing educational and cultural spaces on the challenging slope, the garden picks up a new identity (not to scale).


BNIM INTERNSHIP K ANSA S CIT Y, MISSOUR I SEVEN MONTH INTERNSHIP L AN DS C APE - PL AN N I N G S T U D I O

As I progress through the studio sequence I am further developing my design process, which formed the framework of skills I took with to my internship. Class projects are grounded in theoretical circumstances, and expose MLA candidates to a small segment of the project timeline. During my internship I began to grasp the larger series of events (from targeting future clients to bidding, addendum, and construction administration). While on internship I learned how to use Revit for Autodesk. I used Revit to coordinate the landscape architectural construction documentation with the architectural, mechanical electrical, structural and plumbing drawings. I also worked closely with urban planners while putting together comprehensive plans for neighborhoods, cities, and regions, developing both graphics and diagrams. (right) Digital landscape renderings by author for a design proposal in New Orleans and the Bloch School of Business at University of Missouri-Kansas City. (far right) Zone-wide concept plan by author for Manheim Park, a neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri.


37TH

VIRG V GIN NIA N

WATK TKINS KINS

BROOKLYN N

HOLMES

2266 2277

K

CLE CLEVE CLEV C EVELA LA LAND AND AN ND

CULTURAL CENTER BRUSH CREEK COMMUNITY CENTER BRUS

H CR EEK

BLU

E

TOWN FORK GREENWAY PARK SATCHEL PAIGE MEMORIAL STADIUM

TH

CHERRY

BRUSH CREEK PARKWAY

50

BLUE HILLS PARK

47TH

47TH BRUCE R. WATKINS

E PE OP WO W SW

WABA ASH AS A S

J 52N 52ND 2ND 2N ND

23

MO ONTGA ONT NT TGALL LL L

I

BLUE HILLS

UMKC

ROCKHURST UNIVERSITY

MYRTL MYR M RTLE E

AG AGNES AG W AB AS H

48TH TH

49 49TH 49TH 9

MON NROE N ROE

PARK AR

EASTERN 49-63

EU EUCLI UCL D

TRO T RO OOST OO OOS OST ST

LYDIA DA

WESTERN 49-63

50 50TH 0TH TH

WOOD DLAND LAND D

HA HA HAR ARRISO ARR RRISON

CAMPBELL L LL

47TH 4

ON RT NO

HI

45TH

MYRTLE

50TH

RO CK

PASEO ACADEMY

12

AD

MISSOURI REPERTORY THEATER

H

SR CES

2200

R KE

OAK PARK SOU S OUTH BE O OU BENT ENTO ENT EN NTON N

IVANHOE PARK

E AC

48TH 48 8TH 8T H

L VO

MIDWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE

19

THOMAS J. KIELY PARK R RA LOR FL FLO

KAUFFMAN LEGACY PARK

47TH

CLEVELAND PARK

DRIV NS KIN WAT

A

11 11

2 21 TH

47TH

FRANK A. THEIS PARK

18 18

1155

46

KANSAS CITY SCULPTURE PARK

VINEYARD N

BROO B ROOK KLYN KL LYN

G

NELSON ATKINS MUESEUM

AND

OAK PARK SOUTHEAST

F

45TH

HIGHLAND H LAND

5TH

OLI OLIVE LIV IVE

E

44TH 44T 4T

CITY TITUTE

OAK PARK SOUTHWEST

AGNES A

D

H

IVANHOE SOUTHEAST

WATK ATKIINS NS DRIVE A ACCESS SS ROAD

ORT

GILLHAM PARK

38TH 38T 3 8TH TH

OAK PARK THEATER

MICHI MICH HIIIGAN GAN

WOO WOOD ODLA LAN ND

WAYN A NE E

FLOR FL LORA L A

MANHEIM PARK

SOUTH HYDE PARK

6

B

A

KENWOOD OD D

40TH H

C

INDIA INDIAN ANA NA

5

OLIVE

38TH TH

M

HYDE PARK

CHES C HESTN ST TNUT UT T

3

M

EI

H AN

WA ABASH AB A B BASH

G

1

MC C GEE

WABAS

TRAC ACY CY

LOCUST

ED LE

MOUNT


TURF SOD (329200) 5 Ivr 6 Rpc

Q MULCH BED (329300)

7 Cak

Q

18 Imo

BNIM Architects

106 West 14th Street Suite 200 Kansas p.816.783.1500 f.816.783.1501

Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas & Company MULCH BED (329300) P

MULCH BED (329300)

120 Atlantic Street Norfolk, VA 23510 p.757.321.9600 f.757.321.9601

EXISTING TREE 79 Lss

MULCH BED (329300)

4 Cak

P

12 Wfb

23 Ivr

Missouri State University Planning, Design & Construction

901 South National Avenue Springfield, M p.417.836.5101 f.417.836.6884

Structural Engineering Associates, Inc.

1000 Walnut, Suite 1570 Kansas City, M p.816.421.1042 f.816.421.1061

11 Cak

O

KJWW Consulting Engineers

15 Sunnen Drive, Suite 104 St. Louis, M p.314.645.1132 f.913.956.6670

53 Rpc O 488 Lss

Olsson Associates

113 Lsp

N

MULCH BED (329300)

550 St. Louis Street, Springfield, MO 658 p.417.890.8802 f.417.890.8805

59 Lss

27 Wfb

1 Phs

EXISTING TREE

FSC, Inc.

9 Wfb

9225 Indian Creek Parkway, Suite 300 Ov p.816.333.4373 f.913.722.3484 N

18 Wfb

Construction Management Resources 5201 Johnson Drive Suite 330 Mission, p.913.262.6715 f.913.262.1380

M 109 Lsp 152 Lsp

113 Lsp

M 11 Imo

8 Phs

1 Phs L

228 Lsp 80 Lsp

3

MULCH BED (329300) 1 Pbu

37 Csk

9 Igl

K

76 Hhr

10 Csk

L

8 Jcs

METAL EDGER (329300)

16 Igl

MULCH BED (329300)

K 5 Jcs

16 Igl

WALNUT STREE

719 & 729 East Walnut Stree Springfield, MO 65806

120 Hhr MULCH BED (329300) J

J PLANTING BED WITH MULCH (329300)

GRASS PAVEMENT SYSTEM (329200) (RE: G7/L550)

MSU Project No: 11037-140 BNIM Project No: 11039.00

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

32 Hhr

Issued:

1 Cca H

H

Rev. # 3

05/25/2012

Description ADDENDUM #3

6 Cak 8 Cak TURF SOD (329200)

MULCH BED (329300) G

G

3 Mvp

METAL EDGER (329300)

1 Qbi MULCH BED (329300)

F 51 Lah

127 Hhr

MULCH BED (329300)

F

MULCH BED (329300) Key Plan

DN

E

12 Cak

E

GRASS PAVEMENT SYSTEM (329200) (RE: G7/L550)

D

D 10 Pah

2 Sre

GRASS PAVEMENT SYSTEM (329200) (RE: G7/L550)

63 Pah

31 Lah

75 Hhr

14 Jsb

29 Pah

2 Sre

34 Lah

81 Hhr

11 Jsb

12 Pah

115 Pah

2 Sre

TURF SOD (329200)

Seal

C

C

License Name: Berkebile Nelson I McDowell Incorporated

Profession Name: Architectural Co Licensee Number: 000377 B

B

LANDSCAPE PLAN (SE QUAD

A1 Landscape Plan (SE Quadrant) 1/8" = 1'-0"

RE:

TN

A

A 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

L121c 7/3/2012 2:35:59 PM


FLASHING RECEIVER (076200

1

COUNTER-SINK SCREW WITH WOOD PLUG TO MATCH (0640

2'-0"

LUMBER FURRING (062013) TYP. 16" O.C.

A9 L557

LUMBER SIDING (062013) 4"

STEEL TUBE COLUMN, 6X6 (051200) (RE: STRUCTURAL)

1

EXISTING WALL

EXISTING DRAIN INLET ALIGN WITH BOTTOM OF COPING SYSTEM (076200) (RE: J14/A331)

EXISTING ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER AND CONCRETE PAD

ALIGN FENCE TO BUILDING PANELS

H

J14L557

1

2'-0"

EXISTING WALL

2'-0"

LUMBER SIDING (062013)

(2) EXISTING REFRIGERATION UNIT AND CONCRETE PAD

MATCH ADJ ARCHITECTURAL COPING HEIGHT

J

STEEL TUBE COLUMN, 6X6 (051200)

1

RE: A1 L100

14'-3"

STEEL TUBE, 2X2 (055000) (RE: STRUCTURAL)

2'-0"

G

12'-0 1/4" CLEARANCE

2'-0"

4'-11"

GUARDRAIL SYSTEM (055213)

Mechanical Yard Enclosure -- West Elevation

A6L558

GUARDRAIL SYSTEM (055213)

1

RE: A1 L100

6'-0"

8'-0"

9'-2"

1 4" 1'-3"

8'-2"

8'-0"

2'-9" 3'-9"

1

1'-3" 4".

7'-1 1/2"

(2) EXISTING REFRIGERATION UNIT AND CONCRETE PAD

CIP COLUMN FOOTING (RE: S (033000)

STEEL TUBE, 2X2 (055000) (RE: STRUCTURAL)

A9 L557

F1L558 2'-0"

6'-0"

1'-3" 4'-11"

2'-6 1/2"

2'-0"

5'-4"

J1

GAS METER (RE: MEP)

C

1

EXISTING DRAIN INLET

6'-5 1/4"

6X6 STEEL TUBE COLUMN (051200) (TYP. AT MECHANICAL YARD ENCLOSURE AND WASTE ENCLOSURE)

7"

A9 L557 L557

EXISTING ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER AND CONCRETE PAD

D14L557

STEEL TUBE COLUMN, 6X6 (051200) (RE: STRUCTURAL)

6"

6'-3"

ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER AND CONCRETE PAD (RE: MEP)

CIP CONCRETE FOOTING (RE: STRUCTURAL)

D

3" = 1'-0

LUMBER SIDING (062013)

COOLING TOWER (RE: MEP) EXISTING WALL

J14 Enla

CEMENT CONCRETE WALK (321313)

MANHOLE (RE: CIVIL)

6'-1"

5'-9"

LUMBER FURRING (062013) TYP. 16" O.C.

2'-0"

8'-5 1/2"

7'-2"

E

PAD MOUNT SWITCH AND CONCRETE PAD(RE: MEP)

" /2 81 7'-

6'-8 1/2"

4" = 1'-0"

1'-4 1/4"

F

12'-0"

N1

1

GUARDRAIL SYSTEM4'-0" (055213) 4'-3"

L557

1

ALIGN ARCHIT LUMBE

DN

1/8" = 1'-0"

8'-5 1/2"

7'-2"

6'-0"

5'-9"

1'-3"

GAS METER (RE: MEP)

1

2'-6 1/2"

4" 1'-3"

8'-2"

5'-4"

9'-2"

1 2'-9" 3'-9"

7'-1 1/2"

(opposite, below) Landscape planting concepts for the Bloch School of A9 L557 Business at University of MissouriKansas City.

N1

1

L557

DN

6

7

(above) Author used Revit to coordinate consultants while designing a mechanical yard for 1 Missouri State University apartments.

8

9

10

RE: A1 L101a

CEMENT CONCRETE PAD (RE: CIVIL)

11

12

1'-3" 4".

(right) Sectional detail for the mechanical yard fence, designed to screen F1L558 and secure the heating and cooling equipment at Missouri State University.

4'-0"

CIP COLUMN FOOTING (RE: STRUCTURAL) (033000)

4'-3"

1

Enlarged Plan @ Mechanical Yard

8" = 1'-0"

5

6'-8 1/2"

8'-0" 6'-5 1/4"

6X6 STEEL TUBE COLUMN (051200) (TYP. AT MECHANICAL YARD ENCLOSURE AND WASTE ENCLOSURE)

J1

4

L557 (opposite, above) Revit planting plan for a mixed-use apartment complex for Missouri State University, in Springfield, Missouri.

6'-0"

L557 CIP CONCRETE FOOTING (RE: STRUCTURAL)

3

RE: A1 L557

D14L557

ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER AND CONCRETE PAD (RE: MEP)

6'-3"

A9

2 8'-0"

1 COOLING TOWER (RE: MEP)

1" = 1'-0"

MANHOLE (RE: CIVIL)

A

1

A9 Wall Section @ Mechanical Yard Enclosure

CEMENT CONCRETE WALK (321313)

PAD MOUNT SWITCH AND CONCRETE PAD(RE: MEP)

" /2 81 7'-

RE: A1 L101a

1'-4 1/4"

GUARDRAIL SYSTEM (055213)

6'-1"

A1

1

A6L558

Enlarged Plan @ Mechanical Yard

7"

12'-0"

B

6"

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

RE: A1 L100

3"

1/4" = 1'-0"

1'-5 1/2"

J1

Mechanical Yard Enclosure -- West Elevation Mechanical Yard Enclosure -- Southeast Elevation

A9 Wall Section @ Mechanical Yard Enclosure 1" = 1'-0"

RE: A1 L557

D14 E 13


MASTERS REPORT CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO DR. HUSTON GIBSON, PROFESSOR KATIE KINGERY-PAGE, AND DR. MICHAEL WESCH

Designers have failed to address rapid urbanization in developing countries, resulting in makeshift spatial forms and sporadic, seemingly random settlement patterns. These highly-organized urban clusters are home to 1 in 6 people worldwide; and by 2030 the number of people living in slums is expected to double from 1 billion to 2 billion (Smith, 2011, p. 3). Extreme levels of poverty fostered in these communities causes deficiencies in a child’s development, who are often without access to a formal, structured education system (UNDP, 1999, p. 28). My master’s project proposes a typology of sustainable landscape amenities for Mexican public spaces that positively impact the development of children living in informal shanty town developments. Infusing public spaces with purpose and fostering learning environments that teach children critical thinking and problemsolving skills will encourage creativity, dreams, and life aspirations. (right) Auto-ethnographic study route map. (far right) Student-generated workplan for individual research, through March 2013.


MORE ABOUT ME I am many things: first and foremost, I am a daughter and a sister; but beyond that I am a thinker and a leader. I am human: I recognize my limitations and immerse myself in other’s knowledge. But most importantly I am a designer, which I believe affords me the unique opportunity to take risks boldly, imaginatively respond to complex problems, and serve others positively through landscape architecture. I view design professions as an outlet for social advocacy, using landscape architectural design as a means for creating culturally acute and contextually appropriate public spaces. As an emerging landscape architect I am most looking forward to advancing public interest design initiatives in everyday practice. Designers have an irreplaceable role in the assault against poverty, water access issues, social injustices, and much more. I too plan on providing quality design services to nontraditional clients, fostering a pathway to a more socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable world.

(above) After learning how to use a pottery wheel at Camp War Eagle and teaching campers throwing basics, I enjoy sharpening my pottery skills. This sketch is from a motion mapping exercise.

(right) At Better Block KC, landscape architecture and planning students helped stage a new, pedestrianfriendly streetscape for one day. I helped co-organize the event. Photo by Jessie King.



Lauren Ewald: Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2013