Page 1

THE BEST OF THE ACCLAIMED

t/

T.V.

SERIES

t

DEBBIE TRAVIS WITH BARBAR


S29.95 :

$44.95)

Debbie Travis' Painted House Paint has long been valued as a fast and creative

and

way

to give your

home

Debbie

series

House shares the

new

look,

host of the popular

for the first time, the

television

a fresh

Painted

Travis'

well-kept trade secrets that

have made her one of today's hottest paintedfinishes experts.

Based on her groundbreak-

ing philosophy that spectacular paint effects

need not be the product of messy

paints

oil

and complicated techniques, Debbie Travis' Painted House offers complete instructions for

more than

thirty-five incredible finishes, all

created using worry-free water-based paints

and glazes. In

the

learn

all

section, "Getting Started," you'll

first

you need to know about materials,

tools, surfaces,

and preparation, including the

pros and cons of different types of paint and

how

to

make

your

own inexpensive

tives to costly professional

alterna-

brushes and tools.

You'll also find inspiration for

choosing colors

and working around a specific theme, such as a Southwestern or English Country style.

The

next section covers finishes for walls and floors, offering patterned

The

final

and textured looks.

section demonstrates finishes that

work best with the smaller surfaces of

furni-

ture and decorative accessories, such as gilding

—from

and faux tortoiseshell. Each project

a simple colorwashed wall to an elegant faux

marble mantel, from a time-worn antiqued sideboard to a contemporary looking "sheet metal" table

—

is

accompanied by detailed

photography and step-by-step instructions, as well as suggestions for alternative looks

and

valuable tips to ensure truly professional results.

Lavishly illustrated and packed with impor-

tant information, precise

(continued on back flap)

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Debbie Travis'

Painted

House %


Debbie Travis'

Painted

House DEBBIETRAVIS with

BARBARA DINGLE

*/

\% **

**

*

%*

Clarkson Potter/Publishers

New

York


©

Copyright

1997 by Debbie

Travis

Principal photography by Ernst Hellrung; additional photography by:

Alain Sirois; Richard Poissant; Nicole Khoury; Jean-Luc Laporte;

All

rights reserved.

No part

of this

Stephane

Poulin;

and Christian Guay

book may be reproduced or transmitted

in

any

form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage

and

retrieval

system, without permission

in

writing from the publisher.

Published by Clarkson N. Potter/Publishers,

10022. Member

Random House,

New

Inc.

of the

201 East 50th

Street,

New

York,

New

York

Crown Publishing Group.

York, Toronto, London, Sydney, Auckland

http://www.randomhouse.com/

CLARKSON N.POTTER, POTTER, and colophon

are trademarks of Clarkson N. Potter,

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE and the paintbrush logo are trademarks Whalley-Abbey Media Holdings,

Printed

in

Inc.

of

Inc.

*A^i&\

China

DESIGN BY LISA GOLDENBERG Library of

Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Travis, Debbie.

Debbie Travis' painted house

:

Quick and easy painted finishes for walls, floors, and

furniture using water-based paints / by p.

Debbie Travis

;

text by Barbara Dingle.

cm.

Includes index. 1.

House 3.

Furniture painting—Amateurs' manuals. —Amateurs' manuals. Dingle, Barbara. decoration —Amateurs' manuals.

painting

Interior

2.

II.

I.

TT323.T73

1997

698M— dc21

96-37440

ISBN 0-609-60155-5

20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13

CIP

Title.


—

To the three males

my

in

life

Hans, Josh, and Max Hans, who made everything possible,

and Josh and Max

for their love

and understanding when my head

was elsewhere.

Acknowledgments Debbie

Painted House was written

Travis'

response to and success of the Debbie series.

The many

a large

demand

inquiries

because of the enormous

Travis'

Painted House television

from viewers seemed to point out the existence of

for a decorative paint

book that was packed with innovative

ideas and basic, easy-to-follow instructions.

It

thanks to the imagination

is

and talent of the team of painters who work on the show that

made

possible.

Amand,

Guay

for her

Many thanks and

I'd like

Pam

to Alison Osborn,

Elaine Miller, Valerie Finney, Bruce

Caroline

vision,

Huge thanks

vivid

this

book was

Debs Brennan, Pauline

St.

Emo, and Mai McSpurren, and to

endless efficiency.

to Barbara Dingle, who managed to put

all

my

thoughts,

imagination onto the written page.

to give particular

acknowledgment to my editor

at Clarkson Potter,

Krauss, for her faith and enthusiasm for this book. Also a special thanks

to her

dynamic assistant, Margot Schupf.

Special thanks to everyone at

my

first

network,

WTN,

for

Special thanks also to Maggie Drew at Canadian Manda,

mental

in

putting the project

in

motion.

all

their support.

who was

instru-


Contents Preface 8

Part One Getting Started 11 1 All

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

30

About Paints, Glazes, Varnishes, Brushes, and Tools 32 Preparation

42

Professional Tips for Painting

2

Rooms 49

FOUR MASTER TECHNIQUES

52

Colorwashing 55 Ragging

59

Sponging 63 Dragging

Part

Two

67

Finishes for Walls and Floors 70 3

TEXTURED FINISHES Frottage

76

Bagging

79

Flogging

81

Fresco

84

Painting Stucco

87

Colorwashing on Wood

4

PATTERNS Stripes

90

92

95

Squeegee Stripes 99 Stamping 101

Stamping Checks 102 Rubber Stamping 105

74


Combing 107

111

Terra-Cotta Tiles

Stone Blocking 115

Diamonds 119

121

Tartan

5

STONE FINISHES

124

Easy Marble 127

129

Carrara Marble

Sienna Marble 132

135

Faux Granite

Part Three Finishes for Furniture, Trim, and Accessories 139 6

ANTIQUE AND SPECIALTY FINISHES 140 Milk Paint

143

Antiquing

146

Crackle Finish

149

Aged Plaster 151 Faux Tortoiseshell

7

154

METALLIC FINISHES 156 Sheet Metal 158

160

Verdigris

Faux Rust

165

Gilding

8

163

STENCILING AND BLOCK PAINTING 168 Stenciling

171

Block Painting

177

Resources 182 Index

183


Preface I

have always loved decorating.

ber as a

girl

it

find ingenious

walls of

to

me

my

kept

Luckily,

free rein with

and wallpaper,

leftover paint, crayons, I

ways

depending on my mood.

had a mother who gave

vided

tiny

look either bigger, brighter, cozier,

or wilder, I

my

constantly rearranging

bedroom, trying to

make

remem-

I

pro-

efforts within the four

some

successful,

in

into a slightly grim

to cover food

that with a

hand

home

real

full

roommate and

first

room a pale

it

a

We

paint effect.

to our friends,

like

literally

I

room

who

money on

the room.

the whole family had gone for a walk,

I

gave the walls two coats, and by the time they

came

my room looked

back,

of the old English

fering constant

phone booths.

it.

we decided

to repaint

chose a dark ochre and

on a coat, but when

we stood

rolled

back,

we

decided the room looked too dark. Grabbing sheets

we

of newspaper,

remove the wet

to

tried

paint. To our great surprise,

a wonderful soft, creased effect emerged.

We

discovered that when

we

laid

the paper

To this day, a pink glow shows

off,

the wall looked

is

wasn't the fash-

shelter

turing the

(home

my

style)

skirt

heart racing,

magazines

fea-

newest design trends. Soon the

confines of

my room

left

more expansive spaces

me

hungry for

to conquer.

suede.

like

We

used

this effect

rooms ever that

it's

since. Of course

rub"

in

those early years

that paint

I

now know

comes from

French (see page 76).

tant lessons that First,

I've

other people's living

called frottage, which

frotter, "to In

in

it

finished

the room with squeals of delight, and

on the walls.

it

length or haircut that set

8

looked

on the painted surface and pulled

I

magazines flaunting the latest

was

it

flat

Throughout my teens,

it

it

liv-

painted

through whatever color

ion

After suf-

headaches and finding

hard to study or sleep at night over

one

like

We

had painted our

scrambled eggs. Thor-

of

full

stumbled onto

exclaimed

all

oughly disheartened,

when

my

and proudly showed

yellow,

weekend spent two weeks' saved pocket gloss paint. On Sunday afternoon,

I

and character.

never forget the exhilaration when

ing

a gallon of fire-engine red high-

soon discovered

lots of imagination,

of color

once

a book, and the following

enough money

could easily turn those drab rooms into a

first

with a picture of a red

and

furniture,

I

apart-

scavenged second-

paint,

little

our

I

rent,

my own and

basement

barely had

I

and

projects

better forgotten.

became obsessed seen

— some

struck out on

I

ment. Although

I'll

years of experimentation

I'd

moved

my bedroom.

That room would become a canvas for

room

At nineteen

is

I

still

learned two imporhold true today:

the most inexpensive


decorating tool around, and, second, that

persuading them that anyone can paint

has the power to transform any space

and decorate a room. The actual painted

it

own personal

into your

Although

I

studied fine arts,

valuable experience great

the

I

of

whom

painters

I

London. They taught

about the beauty of color and the

satility of all

in

my most

came from some

decorative

worked alongside

me

finishes are not what intimidates people,

vision.

ver-

working with glazes, but most of

learned not to be afraid to experiment

and to develop my own recipes and

style.

These are the most important lessons hope

I

pass along to you.

to

When

I

married and moved to Canada

resurgence

beginning to see a

getting started that's the trick. Over

and over colors?

in

in

am asked: How do choose my How much skill is necessary to I

I

achieve these effects? Can

I

paint over

wallpaper, or laminated kitchen cabinets?

This book

and more.

when

answer these questions

will

It

is

the guide

I

wish

had

I'd

started decorative painting

first

I

with lots of pictures to inspire you, and clear,

1986, the art of decorative painting was just

it's

step-by-step instructions to guide

you through each painted

The rooms beautifully

finish.

selected demonstrate

I've

how simple

paint effects can

North America. There were only a few

transform plain walls, floors, and furniture.

books or how-to magazines on the market.

Some books

As my career as a decorative painter

blos-

ing alongside

tech-

estly believe that

somed,

I

made up many

my own

of

niques and tried to simplify complicated recipes with

in

some

of the

previously worked

I'd

England. After teaching paint

ishes for several years,

I

fin-

produced four

decorative painting videos. These were a great success, and the public

demand

for

rules for

put a degree-of-difficulty mark-

each paint

effect, but

making a glaze and begin

ishes are easy

am

all

new ways

to decorate with paint.

home

full

my

spirit.

And never

Painted House. Now,

body has caught paint

it

seems

Travis'

that every-

As a result of my experiences teaching painting techniques,

demonstrating and

speaking at home shows, and answering questions on

call-in talk

shows,

I

feel

my

job has evolved from simply teaching people

how

of your

to paint to also reassuring

and

hope

let

living

fill

your

own personality and a few

"miscalcula-

bedroom

tions" like a fire-engine red

scrambled egg

fever!

I

that once you get started, you'll use this

painted finishes kept growing, which led to

Debbie

fin-

constantly learning and discovering

wonderful decorating medium to

series,

the

to

— and very rewarding.

simple instructions on versatile, durable

television

hon-

once you learn the basic

manipulate and play with paint,

I

I

or a

room stop you. Don't

miss the fun and exhilaration of transforming the

rooms you

live

in

every day into

spaces that make you smile.


*'*-

•'.

-


t

PART ONE

Getting Started Painted finishes are truly impressive— and they always look as they are a

lot

more work than they really

are!

if

think that's what

I

many people from painting or decorating their homes themselves. How many times have you said, "Oh, Z could never do stops so

I'm not artistic" or "I

that,

don't have the time." Believe

me, anyone can paint a room.

And armed with a

understand how paints and glazes work. this

have concentrated on water-

I

based paints and

little

book

—you may know them as

acrylic paints.

I

find

water-based paints

to be ideal for indoor projects

duce stunning paint effects. first

House

because they

are nearly odorless, dry quickly, and clean

up easily off brushes and hands with warm

section of Debbie Travis' Painted

water.

designed to provide you with

mend

is

all

If

you're truly a beginner,

taking a

little

I

recom-

time to get used to the

the information you need to begin creating

feeling of working with a paintbrush,

beautiful painted effects.

much

It

contains invalu-

able advice on everything from where to find ideas for different projects to

ishes

is

real

work with a

smooth.

how

self with

to

prime a floor to the correct way to paint a

The

paint to pick up at

choosing

the right colors for your home, from

chair.

latex

practice

and know-how, anyone can pro-

This

In

key to successful paint

fin-

learning a bit about paint so you

It's

roller

how

one time, how

to

so that your strokes are

important to familiarize your-

any new paint, glaze, or tool before

you begin a large project;

you'll

be more

relaxed and able to enjoy the experience

if

you feel confident with your equipment.

11


and exteriors

you've done yourself, because you've cho-

newfound freedom

sen the colors and finishes you love and

from traditional decorating rules. Don't be

combined them with personal belongings

Long reserved

for walls

only, paint is enjoying a

afraid

where

to

experiment with

— after

all,

every-

paint

walls, floors,

and

furni-

to create an environment that's uniquely

yours.

So

let's

get started!

ture are only surfaces that can be wiped

clean, or recovered with another coat of paint or a different finish.

heart

if

the

book

doesn't measure

final project

up to the picture you or magazine.

And don't lose

fell

in

love with

in

a

Remember, the most

successful decorating projects are those

I

iN>/

Finding Inspiration I'm often

ideas featured on

my

get

I

all

the great

television series.

I

work with an energetic and enthusiastic

team who are as taken as

> ?\L

&&"*>

Divide. iV j0fj

asked where

ivy

-y&ClK Cof

I

am

by the end-


less possibilities and creative solutions that paint offers the

here

I've

home

decorator, and

included a selection of the

sources that often provide us with a ing point

re-

start-

whenever we're facing a set of

blank walls.

One

of

my

favorites

is

a scrapbook that

contains swatches of fabrics, photos, and other bits and pieces

Why

the years.

own

it

collected over

I've

make one

not

of your

needn't be as elaborate as the

one pictured here, and can include any pattern or color that catches your eye,

in

any form. Remember, personal taste and imagination

are

count when

it

the

only

comes

home, and, with a

dictates

that

to decorating your

bit of paint,

you can cre-

ate any style you want, on any budget.

Here's where to look for ideas:

BOOKS AND MAGAZINES Wherever you

abundance

there's sure to be an

live,

books and

of decorating

style

magazines available, which are always chock

full

and advice on how to

of ideas

Tbese pages from my scrapbook contain swatches of fabric, photographs, and samples of paint finishes and colors — above, around a Swedish tbeme; opposite, in a garden room vein.

HOME SHOWS

create the room of your dreams. You'll

With more and more people now partici-

probably

pating

that

find

you

are

repeatedly

in

their

own home's renovation,

drawn to certain colors, patterns, and

many towns and

themes. Keep track of your favorites by

home shows which showcase new

starting a

file

scrapbook of rooms and

or

ideas that delight you;

it's

or photocopy a page of Also,

easy to tear out

rooms you

love.

look for the do-it-yourself projects

and workshops

in

these publications. Their

step-by-step instructions are another great

resource; even

if

you don't want to

re-

create one of the featured looks exactly, the information

will

no doubt prove invalu-

able for future projects.

cities

now

hold annual

ucts and decorating ideas. These

prod-

shows

often offer free do-it-yourself workshops,

and there are always plenty of demonstrations.

If

you go, you're

likely to

meet peo-

who have the same questions as

ple

and

it's

someone

always fun to hear about what else did with his tiny bathroom,

odd-shaped kitchens, or cathedral I

you,

ceiling.

always walk away with a new idea or

two

— even when

I'm the speaker.

GETTING STARTED

13


PUBLIC SPACES AND PRIVATE

gorized as a type of architectural design

HOMES

simply by their age.

Always keep your mind and eyes open

our

when

homes and

visiting friends'

public

places such as theaters, shops, restaurants,

to

museums

and even

—there's an idea

be found around every corner. For exam-

because restaurants

ple,

with the times, they

keep up

like to

change

decor

their

fre-

and offer a wealth of contempo-

quently,

many

rary design inspirations. Of course,

themes may be too dramatic but you can learn a

lot

for your

home,

by noticing the fun-

homes date back hundreds majority of us

but the

houses

or

some

we're lucky,

If

of years,

probably

apartments that were

of

live

built

in

from

the Victorian era through the present day.

The age of your house, physical

the rooms'

its style,

dimensions, the height of the

walls, the slope of the ceilings

—

all

these

features can act as decorating cues to help to get you started.

homes

Victorian

offer superb architec-

reach ten to

tural detailing. Walls often

damental ways the designer sets the mood;

twelve feet

pay attention to the lighting or the color

adorned with deep plaster moldings, carved

scheme

window and door

in

addition to the food.

There's no harm ideas

when

comes

it

paint finishes

will

your home. Even her

if

carved panels.

yellow, your rasp-

will

have a charac-

in

lifestyle

of the fine

former beauty. But keep all

look spec-

tacular with a simple, fresh coat of white

such as Debbie

shows on

Travis'

Painted

House, walk you through the process of

room together. These shows are

packed with ideas and projects

ally

its

some

embellishment

as

the

ornate

is

unneces-

plasterwork

and

carved wood speak for themselves.

Many decorating and

home

to

paint. Further

TELEVISION

pulling a

you have the patience,

mind that these features

sary,

television,

If

wood down

own.

all its

boards. Most interior doors are solid, with

your friend has ragged in

and high base-

trim,

you may wish to strip

berry-ragged bedroom ter

because

to paint,

and are usually

height,

always look unique to

room walls

living

copying decorating

in

in

for

every

decorator, and the projects are usu-

VCR

shows and add these

will

these older homes, the plaster walls

no doubt be

dition

less than perfect con-

in

and lend themselves beautifully to

textured paint finishes such as colorwashing, ragging,

and fresco,

all

finishes that

uneven surface. You

easily disguise an

instruc-

can even play up the inevitable cracks and

to tape your favorite

repairs with a distressed plaster painted

accompanied by step-by-step

tions. So, set your

In

to your idea library.

effect.

And because

such high

ceilings,

Victorian

homes have

you can also do

inter-

esting things to enliven a large expanse of

Decades of Style Another place to turn for inspiration your

14

home

itself.

Most homes can be

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

wall space. is

to

cate-

Dadoes

or chair rails break up

the height of the walls, bringing them to

"human"

scale.

down

Here's a wonderful


In this Victorian home, the moldings and staircase have been highlighted with a Gothic stencil.

opportunity to play with color and different

leave

thirties

and forties

offer a scaled-down version of the architectural

found

features

in

century-old

homes. Walls are not quite so

high,

and

as

is,

The walls

paint finishes on the upper and lower wall.

Houses from the

it

and highlight only the walls.

will

often have layers of wall-

paper that have already been painted over

once or twice. Stripping away the paper

will

no doubt expose damaged plaster, which will

need some work to

repair. To

save time

present, are sim-

you can simply apply a couple of coats of

and moldings

in

paint.

these rooms look magnificent with faux

fin-

the moldings, while pler.

The doors,

Still

trim,

depth and character to the

ishes such as marble and tortoiseshell,

most

but can look just as good with a simple

all

dragged

the

finish.

often the case

If

in

the trim

homes

is

wood, as

is

of this period,

The texture of the wallpaper

likely a lovely

finish.

hardwood

will

add

There

floor

is

under

that wall-to-wall carpeting. The grain of

wood

will

come up

beautifully with an

interesting stain or paint design.

GETTING STARTED

15


Mass-market building from the fifties to the

seventies

duced a cheaper, houses.

intro-

no-frills interior to

dropped,

Ceilings

mold-

window and door

ings disappeared,

as well as baseboards, be-

trim,

came

purely utilitarian

these

rather

trick is to

awkward

plain

in

will

In

the

interiors,

draw the eye away from

or uninteresting features.

Paint low ceilings white color

form.

—a

dark

down on the

only press

room, giving you the feeling you're inside a box. Diminish the visibility of boring trims by painting

same

color as the walls.

homes, instead of

some form

are

them the In

these

plaster, the walls

of wallboard (gyproc

canvas

or drywall), the perfect

for

the spectacular paint finishes

all

that

demand

a

smooth surface.

Such rooms cry out

an exciting

for

paint technique such as stripes or ing,

wall,

comb-

which are inappropriate for a plaster

where the cracks and bumps would

stand out and spoil the If

Stencils are an easy 'way to add detail to plain walls.

way

to

add

detail.

make your

the ceilings are low,

If

floors a

feature. An old parquet floor might look

dated and yellow, but grid for

it

an exciting floor

makes

cases,

is

a perfect

in

many

dominated by the concept of

open indoor

living

space, where rooms flow

together with no physical barriers to separate sitting,

dining,

new set

and cooking areas.

of

decorating challenges. Where do you start to

one

throughout? One way to break the

finish

expanse of a

two stories

wall that rises

is

to create a visual break by running borders at a natural ceiling height.

You have now

divided the space into an upper and lower wall, perfect for

finish.

Contemporary construction,

This style also inspires a whole

and stop with paint? Must you stick

finish.

your walls have few moldings, then

stencils are an easy

ate an airy and refreshing environment.

complementary finishes

and colors. Another rary

in

contempo-

spaces concerns the proper way

divide

Here

common problem

is

an

open-plan

a technique

I

living/dining

to

room.

have used with great

Cathedral ceilings, walls of glass, and a

success: Paint faux panels onto the walls

continuous sweep of hardwood floor cre-

of both "rooms" using three colors from

16

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


the

same

Keep the "frame"

color family.

around the panels the same color throughout. Paint the panels a light living

shade

room and

a darker

in

the

complementary

the dining room. The

in

shade

same

design

while paint

makes

these looks cost

a powerful impression, little

rooms that

following pages are

On the

to achieve.

I've built

up around a specific theme, inspired by trips

abroad, furniture

picked up at flea

I

and background color keep the space con-

markets, a few yards of fabric, or a color

nected, while the change

palette

gives each space

own

its

in

panel colors

I

loved.

give you ideas.

character.

These rooms are here It's

to

not necessary to incor-

porate every finish and accessory listed or pictured here to capture the true spirit of

Working with

each theme. Use them simply as a guide,

a If

in

Theme

and

let

your imagination do the rest.

you're unsure of the look you want, keep

mind that one of the most interesting

ways

room

SOUTHWESTERN OR DESERT You don't have to

live

theme. The idea can come from anywhere

desert to have

warmth

a favorite piece of furniture or accessory, a

The look

particular color, or a look culled from the

den or any casual space, and

pages of a book or magazine.

one to

of designing

There

is

one theme,

a

no need to adhere

is

around a

rigidly to

any

style, or era of decoration; just

as rustic country pieces can mingle gracefully with

modern pieces, you may choose

to pair an elegant painted finish

such as

faux tortoiseshell with informal furnishings, or

warm up

a starkly

modern

interior

with rich medieval tones. Imagine a stan-

dard white vestibule

in

a

modern home;

even with some pictures and a mirror,

may always

it

look stark and plain. Try stone-

blocking the walls

in

brown, beige, and

is

pull

its

the heat of the

in

fun and relaxed, perfect for a

together

—

terra-cotta pots, wrought iron,

way. Color

is

all-important

Southwestern theme ochre,

in

continued the

spirit

rect colors,

even the most ordinary rooms

can take on new style and character. And

We

by adding a Navajo

border and stencilled Kokapelles lizards. This den

is in

a

modern home

tle architectural detail;

with very

luckily,

lit-

the floors

were wood, an important design element of

Southwestern

The

style.

was

brass with wood, and gave

With the right accessories and the cor-

punctuate

sun-bleached wood and sandy tones.

Southwestern colors and a few

vian tones with a pretty stencil border.

and com-

vibrant red,

and green

turquoise,

didn't

cool yellow and blue Scandina-

some

establishing a

— here,

entrance. Or imagine your bedroom with

in

an easy

fortable furnishings, you're well on your

place surround

painted

it's

you have

if

sandy tones to create a warm, welcoming

cacti, or

your home.

in

look

fit

in

fire-

brass, however, which

we replaced the

very well, so

it

by colorwashing with

paint. Like the

original

house

itself,

a faded, aged

some

white

the furnishings

are modern, but plain. Because the walls

were cathedral height.

I

created

my own

border with kitchen sponges and a stencil:

GETTING STARTED

17


COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

SAND

COLORWASHING

TERRA-COTTA

ANTIQUING/AGING STAMPING FAUX PLASTER STENCILING VERDIGRIS

TERRA-COTTA POTS CACTUS PLANTS

OCHRE TURQUOISE DEEP RED

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

DRIFTWOOD

WROUGHT IRON BLEACHED WOOD NAVAJO PRINTS, BLANKETS, AND RUGS LARGE CANDLES, TALL CANDLESTICKS


into

human

a burgundy border. Incidentally, the walls

for a cozier den,

and by

were colorwashed with a

this brings the wall a

scale and

makes

throwing down

some

space

this inviting

little

is

more

roller,

the fastest

Navajo-inspired rugs,

paint finish you can do (pages 55-57). The

complete.

overall

ticated

look

is

— perfect

comfortable, yet sophisfor

casual entertaining.

CHEAP AND CHIC No money, most found

lots of style. Believe

of the furnishings in

in

this

it

or not,

room were

junkshops and transformed with on a budget

paint. Decorating

challenge, but

often the

always a

your imagination soar

let

most

is

interesting looks are cre-

ated by chance using only what's on hand.

Almost any paint instead

can be used, but

of choosing traditional

go wild and

try

some unusual

The mix of colors

—you

shades,

colors. This

room was great fun

living/dining

well

finish

to paint.

unusual but works out

is

just have to be brave; lay out

color chips from a paint store and play with

combinations

until

you get the

WOW factor.

The empty hanging picture frame, a cheap hardware store

find

covered

in

inexpensive

crushed velvet, helps divide up the space in

this large

loft.

are easy to find in

or

Old in

fifties

cabinet TV sets

junkshops, and painted

crazy colors, they

make

end tables. The table

great consoles is

yellow, black

and white faux granite (pages 135-137) and the walls are emerald and

indigo, with

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

ANYTHING GOES MIX STRONG COLORS WITH PASTELS

FLEA MARKET FIXUPS POSTERS, PRINTS

BURGUNDY YELLOW

COLORWASHING FAUX GRANITE OR MARBLE IN FANTASY COLORS FREEHAND PAINTING SPONGING RAGGING

BLACK EMERALD

BAGGING TARTAN

INDIGO

NO-SEW CURTAINS

GETTING STARTED

19


AFRICAN SAFARI The inspiration behind wonderful

the

Africa.

this living

textures

Although

tunity to visit,

polystyrene foam cut into a

I've

I've

and

comb

(see

room was

page 107). One or two bright accessories

colors

easily

of

never had the oppor-

always loved reading

books and watching TV shows about

this

great continent. As a background, we've

enliven

this

already

theme, and now most

cities

interesting

have ethnic

stores where you can find beautiful yet

inexpensive fabrics and

rugs.

Baskets,

boxes, trunks, cookware, or weapons that are

used exclusively purposes

intended

for

by

their

other

cultures can also be used for

decoration

in

spears stand

your home. Here, in

as curtain rods,

and cooking pots make great plant holders. African colors re-

volve around a palette of beiges,

taupes,

and browns, and are

brought to

life

with bright greens

and earthy reds.

SHABBY CHIC Combining and

soft,

crisp,

clean whites

muted colors with

worn furnishings

is

the keynote

of this popular theme. is

in

a

The idea

to collect objects in tones of

white, mixing

flogged (see pages 81-83) the walls

well-

good pieces and

restored flea market finds and put

them

soft grassy green. There

were no mold-

together against a pastel backdrop. The

my own

with a piece of

look

ings,

so

I

created

loose and

inviting, with

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

GRASS GREEN

COLORWASHING RAGGING

WOOD

BEIGE

TAUPE

BROWN DARK RED

20

is

ANTIQUING FLOGGING

STUCCO CRACKLE FINISH STAMPING COMBING

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

comfy old

AFRICAN FABRICS FURNITURE, EITHER MAHOGANY

OR TEAK FAUX ANIMAL SKINS

SPEARS BASKETS LARGE-LEAF PLANTS AFRICAN TRINKETS


COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

SHADES OF WHITE, FROM CREAM, BEIGE,

COLORWASH RAGGING, DRAGG ING

SLIPCOVERS

GRAY, TO PASTELS,

FADED COLORS

FRESCO STUCCO ANTIQUING

CRACKLE FINISH STENCILING

BIG SOFT CHAIRS,

COUCHES ANTIQUES GARAGE SALE FINDS WARM CARPETS OLD LAMPS

COLORWASH ON WOOD

GETTING STARTED

21


chairs or couches re-covered textures, accessories

lace for a pretty accent

underfoot.

When

light

in

white

in

off-white

tones,

some

and a warm carpet is lightly

tinted with

other colors you can create a broad spec-

trum of "off whites"

literally

hundreds of

frames, and furniture.

homeowners

often find that

are afraid to work with dark

myth that the rooms

colors. There's a

look smaller. But

atmosphere

I

will

deep colors add wonderful

to any room. I've

added Asian

pieces and accessories which work beauti-

shades, from creams and beiges to pastel

fully with

the ragged walls and gold paisley

whites with a hint of blue, pink or yellow.

stencils.

The walls

room the pure white on the chair

this

In

rail

wallpaper which

I

originally

left

had a textured

on and painted over,

and fireplace anchor and frame the room, as well as highlight the beau-

duck egg blue walls, and

tiful

white tones

off-

the furnishings. The

in

old carved coffee table

was enlivened

with a coat of crackle and white paint,

and a new needlepoint carpet was flipped

to

show the more muted

palette underneath. This comfortable style fits every

budget

enough

for the kids

enough

for

it's

broken

in

and pets, yet chic

company.

EASTERN INFLUENCE demands

This ornate style

and detailed patterns.

Silk

rich color

cushions

and oriental carpets add much to the design, but this for

a

is

also the perfect setting

variety of paint finishes

such as

antiquing and stenciling. Touches of gold

can

be

added

everywhere,

to

lamps,

red.

to

Dramatic decorating

rooms we don't

is

"live" in,

better suited

but creates an

exciting setting for entertaining.

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

JEWEL TONES: RED SAPPHIRE BLUE OCHRE GOLD

RAGGING BAGGING

RICH FABRICS TRIMMED WITH GOLD, TASSELS ASIAN BOXES, TRUNKS

ANTIQUING

CRACKLE FINISH FROTTAGE PATINA GILDING STENCILING

22

using a dark red glaze ragged over a lighter

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

ORNATE MIRRORS AND PICTURE FRAMES


COUNTRY FARMHOUSE

effect. Of course,

Nowadays, country kitchens are popular and suburban homes because of

city

warmth and comfortable look

is

in

these heritage colors

also look great on their own.

This

their

is

actually a newly built kitchen

The country

with inexpensive pine cupboards, but by

also one of the easiest looks to

applying a dragged and ragged effect with

style.

whole room has a

reproduce, given the right paint colors and

historic paint colors, the

accessories. Due to increasing demand,

country

most manufacturers

nish applied to the surfaces, this

have

launched

a

series of historic paint colors; these lowkey, rustic

shades make marvelous

part-

kitchen tear.

style.

will

With a couple of coats of var-

homey

stand up to everyday wear and

Pots hang within easy reach; utensils

ners with complementary finishes such as

and crockery double as perfect decorative

ragging and

accents.

dragging,

or with

an

aged

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

RUSTIC NATURALS OLD GREEN RUSTY RED

RAGGING DRAGGING ANTIQUING/AGING

PINE HUTCH CAST-IRON COOKWARE

YELLOW OCHRE

COLORWASHING

TEAL BLUE

STENCILING STAINING

BARRELS BASKETS OLD TOOLS

GETTING STARTED

23


BL

J

v

vj

iJ

-^^D

^^s»^

-^^^^^^T^™

1

^^Uf ^-vSkB

Ion v

^r-^

w --~H

H^BKjf _^^^H

EH ^^&r-4^H

^^r^

^--'


COLORS A WIDE

ACCESSORIES

PAINT FINISHES

SPECTRUM

SPONGING RAGGING COLORWASHING DRAGGING

OF PASTELS AND RICH

DEEP SHADES

ANY TYPE OF COLLECTION BOTANICAL PRINTS ANTIQUES PLATE RAILS LACE, CHINTZ, TARTAN

ANTIQUING VERDIGRIS

STAMPING/BLOCK PAINTING

BOOKS FLOWERS

STENCILING

ENGLISH COUNTRY STYLE It's

painting technique works equally as well

the furnishings that lend English coun-

warm,

try style its

Couches,

and knicknacks, passed

tables,

chairs,

inviting look.

along through generations, have a well-worn comfort to them.

be used

in

Most colors can

ate any sharp contrasts. Layer tablecloths,

window treatments, and

play prints, photographs lect,

— anything you

wherever there's room. Here,

textured wall finishes

make

like

it's

dining

room

is

In

add a

to

bit of

— any-

whimsy

or

old-fashioned charm.

Scandinavian homes.

softly

daylight, this in

always loved the

I've

col-

colorwashes

fresh and sunny, but

SCANDINAVIAN INFLUENCE light-filled interiors of

the soft terra-cotta col-

ors that give this effect.

where you want

dis-

a perfect backdrop for this pretty,

welcome look

bedroom, bathroom, or kitchen

built-in,

this style, but don't try to cre-

carpets, and

a

in

the

Although

the

vary from

Sweden

Norway

and

Denmark

to Finland,

styles to

from

their

rooms are gen-

erally

simple and graceful. Colors are pure

evening, with the right lighting, the room

and cool, and

takes on an intimate, romantic glow. The

Scandinavians' love for painted finishes

charming wisteria (see pages 177-179)

goes back centuries, and

was easy

dent on their furnishings, from simple coun-

to apply

and gives a completely

different look than stenciling. This block

try

detail

is

often naive. The

is

especially evi-

pieces to highly decorated armoires,

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

GRAY BLUES TERRA-COTTA

STENCILING

DRAGGING COLORWASHING PAINTED STUCCO FRESCO

LOTS OF WOOD FURNITURE WITH SIMPLE LINES COUNTRY ANTIQUES PINE PIECES

ANTIQUING

RUGS

PALE YELLOWS SOFT GREENS WHITE

CRACKLE FINISH

GETTING STARTED

25


COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

LAVENDER BLUE BRIGHT YELLOW ANY COLORS FOUND IN THE GARDEN

STENCILING

LOTS OF POTS OF

STAMPING

FLOWERS WICKER FURNITURE

RAGGING SPONGING

HAND-PAINTED FURNITURE SISAL RUGS

and bureaus. Here

beds, I've

COLORWASHING

chosen a clean, fresh and

blue

white

palette,

and set the stage by dragging (see pages 67-69) a

blue

over a

glaze

white

base coat on the walls. The homemade

and

stencil

crisp linens suit the

mood

Although

wall-

perfectly.

to-wall carpet cally

is

not typi-

Scandinavian,

already

in

was

it

this girl's bed-

room, and

its

and

work well with

fiber

natural color

this timeless style. It's al-

ways

important to

work

with

what you have

got.

This

simple

look

will last

yet

elegant

a long time.

A GARDEN

ROOM

Any size or shape room

will

make

a perfect

garden room, as long as there are windows large

enough

minimum

to let

of natural

in lots

of decorating

beautiful

potted plants and flowers. Here with a pretty round

from floor to

ceiling,

A

required, as this

is

theme revolves around

light.

rows of

we

started

room with wainscoting and

I

wanted

it

to be

bright

and cheerful every day, no matter

26

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

what the weather. To pick the took a look at

my

colors,

I

just

garden, and decided

on lavender blue and a bright buttercup yellow

— nature's

ration for

palette

is

a perfect inspi-

any room. The interesting details

of the

windows were highlighted by painting

them

lavender, and then applying a reverse

stenciled border. sive clay pots for

I

also decorated inexpen-

my

indoor garden, each


and onto some,

with a different paint finish; I

moss and

glued natural materials such as

as well as buttons

raffia,

have on hand

do. This

will

— anything

is

you

a good way to

paint finishes before

practice decorative

tackling a room. Even

if

out perfect the

time, with plants

them,

they'll

first

the pots don't turn in

look great!

I've

softened the room by ragging the

stripes.

The panels have been decorated

at the

end of

this book), which

been used on the window black highback chairs are

this look,

The

you need a plain room with few

combine

ors, simple stencil patterns,

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928),

unadorned furnishings and

one of Scotland's greatest architects and

wonderfully.

typical col-

and sleek, it

will

work

the inspiration behind

is

dining

blinds.

modern pieces

MACKINTOSH STYLE

this

has also

based on Mackintosh's designs. To create

or no moldings. Just

designers,

Resources

with a Mackintosh stencil (see

room.

Arts and Crafts

Inspired

by the

movement, Mackin-

tosh was a great admirer of stencils

and stained glass. He loved clean lines

and simple shapes, and often

turned to nature as a source for decoration. His choice of color

was

un-

usual for his time; the Victorians

surrounded themselves with a dark, rather morbid palette and busy pat-

terns,

whereas Mackintosh chose

soft greens,

lilac,

and his signature

black as accents

against gray or

white walls. This dining room of the

Mackintosh

is

my

style.

adaptation

The gray

walls have been paneled with

lilac

stripes, but instead of plain paint,

COLORS

PAINT FINISHES

ACCESSORIES

BLACK WHITE GRAY

STENCILING

MODERN FURNISHINGS STAINED GLASS WINDOW BLINDS ANYTHING LINEAR

LILAC

RAGGING

PALE GREEN ROSE PINK

GETTING STARTED

27


The luxurious furnishings

Choosing Colors

speak

Another important element of your painted

point,

finish is color,

which seems to be one of

I

room but

themselves; they are the focal

for

and the

serve as a

plain white walls

muted background. But most

of us don't

have priceless antiques, so our rooms can

can't t&H you what color to paint your

be given character, passion, elegance, and

— a question

I'm

charm by choosing wonderful colors and

asked repeatedly

can show you what colors work well

I

these rooms

peo-

the biggest stumbling blocks for ple.

many

in

how you can choose

together, and

combinations that

will

simple-to-produce painted finishes.

color

COLOR AT YOUR

please you.

Don't be afraid to experiment with

dif-

FINGERTIPS

ferent colors as well as different finishes

You don't have to know how to mix colors

when you're

to

love, the

decorating; go with colors you

way you do when you are shop-

work with

ishes. Just

the different painted

all

choose the colors that you

ping for clothes. Bold colors are perfect for

want from a color chart

rooms

and the salesperson

in

which you entertain; washed-out

or faded colors provide soft, subtle back-

grounds

in

busy rooms

kitchens and

like

bathrooms. Bright colors

like

apple green,

the spot.

Most

at the paint store,

paint

companies

many as catch your eye free

darker colors appealingly reflect the

turers,

ences between day and evening

lighting,

their

—from

as dens and children's bedrooms, while differ-

all

and mix and match them

and your furnishings.

my

are afraid of putting color on their

living

love to put a dark green

room, but I'm afraid

the room too small" or

both

common

until

you

fits

with your

in

home, your

lifestyle,

how many peo-

I'm always surprised at

I'd

usually

get the combination that appeals to you,

and romantic

walls. "Oh,

—they're

the different paint manufac-

and

ple

offer large paint

paints are sold. Collect as

looking simple and elegant during the day at night.

you on

for

chips, about two inches by four inches,

perfect for what

happy rooms, such

it

worry-free.

It's

where

call

mix

will

primrose yellow, and cornflower blue are I

fin-

"I'll

it

will

make are

tire of it"

laments, and so

in

many

stay

SIMPLE SOLUTIONS The simplest and safest way color

is

to

match

carpet, or rug.

it

to

choose a

up to an existing

fabric,

you are starting with a

If

clean slate, pick the fabric for your couch

with beige, cream, or white walls. There's

or curtains

nothing wrong with these colors; on the

ors available, you can always find a match;

contrary, a

room painted

in

different tones

it's

first.

much more

With the

infinite paint col-

difficult to

work

of white can be quite beautiful. You've no

reverse, and a mistake with fabric

doubt noticed that

lier

terior

in

all

the high-end

in-

design and architecture magazines

the walls are consistently white or beige.

28

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

in is

the cost-

to correct.

Choose one

of the colors from the pat-

tern that you really

like,

then take a swatch


This hallway has been given new

life

with a painted diamond floor and apple green walls.

of the fabric to a paint or hardware store

and

among

find that color

cards. Each card

shades

will

the paint chip

display four to six

of a particular color, ranging from

light to dark; this is called

a color family.

If

called

If

and

color family, you can't go wrong.

trim, paint

lovely

frame

them

for the

fer a white ceiling,

height and

white;

will

it

room. And

I

make

a

always pre-

which adds a feeling of

openness

to

applied

generally they're

still

latex paint,

you are interested

If

home

want

or

surfaces,

small

to

economical.

to

its

in

returning an

historic decorating roots,

to give a

new home some

real

country charm, most paint manufacturers

now

carry a special line of vintage or his-

toric colors.

These natural earthy tones

are also found

any room.

acrylics

but because these special finishes are

older

you are unsure about the moldings

Artist's

acrylics.

may be more expensive than

you select one or two shades from the

same

artist's

paint sold

in

in

milk paint, an old type of

powder form that

is

becoming

SPECIALTY COLORS

increasingly popular due to the authentic

Even with the enormous color variety of

finish

water-based paint finishes

paints in

this

available,

for

some

book you may have

seek out special colors. A few finshes,

to

like

it

produces and

its

environmentally

safe ingredients. I

am

always delighted at how pleasantly

surprised people are

when they have taken

faux tortoiseshell, are a reproduction of

the plunge and added a bold color or spe-

the real thing, and for the most successful

cial

results

it's

always best to use true earth

colors, which are found

in

a type of paint

paint finish to their

trust your instincts love, you'll

home.

If

you just

and go with what you

be delighted, too!

GETTING STARTED

29


CHAPTER

1

NEED TO KNOW The world

of paint is constantly

which can create a great deal any paint

finish, it's

you'll need,

changing and improving,

of confusion. Before you begin

important to understand the materials

and the required preparation.

/Preparing

a surface for paint, whether

it's

walls, floors, or furniture, is critical to the life of

your finish. You don't want that beautiful painted pattern on your floor to

lift off,

or the seams of

wallpaper underneath the paint to

show through an elegant ragged wall. I

always find

it

better to split up the prepara-

tion time and the painting time. If you get

everything ready a few days before you plan to paint, then you can really enjoy yourself

when you

start.

1. oil-based glazing liquid; 2. oil paint; 3. latex paint; 4. primer; 5. universal tint; 6. spray paint; 7. metallic powder paint; 8. artist's oil color; 9. artist's acrylic color; lO. stencil crayon; 11. Japan paint; 12. fabric paint; 13. spill-proof stencil cream; 14 and 15. craft stencil paint; 16. latex glazing liquid; 17. milk paint; 18. metal primer; 19. paint color samples; 20. powdered yellow paint; 21. milk paint powder; 22. latex block painting glaze

30


n-ieusa..


an

Finding just the right paint color used to

extremely inexpensive way to add design

be a time-consuming, frustrating task. No

and character to your home. Most effects

more! Today there

don't take long to complete; everything

colors available

Decorating with painted finishes

this

book

ect,

and

no more than a weekend

is

you'll

in

proj-

enjoy your finish for years.

you do the job properly,

recipes and instructions,

you follow

If

know

I

If

ensure an

you'll

almost professional look.

thrilled with

is

of colors, so

one

at

store, look at the color chips for

be

color lines, as well as vintage colors for milk

you'll

paints. Dark colors are

the results!

all

finish or decorative

of white

with color, you

all

difficult to pro-

floors;

see

will

in

in

red

the pastel

hundreds of

yellow. Starting a col-

way

to

Once you get confident

may want

to experiment with

universal tints and artist's acrylics to cre-

own custom-blended

ate your

colors.

Glazing liquid, or glaze coat,

fur-

of us,

lighter

the vast range

virtually

and

as

popular

introduce yourself to the endless variety

types of

accent on

niture. It's readily available to

shades

are

that's available.

wood, cement, and even linoleum and as a

There

more

lection of paint color chips is a great

doors, moldings, and trims; over

walls,

colors.

can be

Painted finishes

applied to virtually any surface:

isn't

or dark blue that you

the most versatile decorating tool find.

as

aren't

shades, so there

Brushes, and Tools you can

you can't find what you want

another brand. There are heritage or rustic

About Paints,

is

if

my

Glazes, Varnishes, Paint

a variety of shades. Each

in

paint brand has a slightly different palette

duce and

All

an incredible range of

is

is

an essen-

When

ingredient for decorative painting.

tial

slows down the drying

usually as close as the neighborhood paint

mixed with

or hardware store,

time and allows you to work and blend the

and

inexpensive.

it's

There are two basic types of paint, water-based

you

visit

you

will

(latex)

and oil-based

(alkyd).

If

a local paint or hardware store,

be amazed by how many variations

of these paints there are on the market: interior

creams paints,

and and

sprays,

and even milk

powders,

paints,

exterior

stencil

acrylics, paint.

more people are doing

their

latex paint is tile

32

oil

latex or acrylic water-based paints.

new

a

technology,

now more durable and

than ever.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

versa-

or

Because

professionals and amateurs alike prefer the

environmentally friendly properties of latex

and

now water-based glazes

acrylics,

turers. This

become

mediums

base, and thus could not be mixed with

own

free water-based paints have

glazing

extenders have been available only with an

available from

painting

it

Traditionally,

As more and

and decorating, the less-toxic and odor-

popular choice. Thanks to

paint.

paint,

means

paint manufac-

quite a revolutionary step

is

that

most major

most

are

paint finishes can

—

it

be

applied easily with nontoxic water-based paints, glazes,

For

all

and varnishes.

the finishes

in

this book,

I

have

used only water-based paints and glazes.


working with

After years

paints,

oil

glazes, and paint thinners,

oil

marvelous

it's

fumes and messy

to be free of the strong

primer.

Check with

person to make sure you are buying the right

primer for your project.

Shellac Shellac

cleanup.

knowledgeable sales-

a

is

an excellent primer for

foam

plaster and raw wood. Apply with a

PAINT PROS AND CONS

brush to seal

Primer Primer

throughout the wood but especially at the

finishes;

the key to most paint

is

creates a bond between the

it

surface you want to paint and the paint

you are applying. The

fin-

knots. The resins

is

ates a solid, nonporous surface for the

quickly.

It's

base coat by sealing new drywall, new

work

repairs you have

spackle.

job

uneven

with caulking or

and contains

and

unpredictable.

Primer should never be used as a base coat; however,

if

you want to apply a dark

base coat, your primer can be

tinted to half

the formula of the paint color. This

will

bleed through your

them

first.

so wear a mask and

a well-ventilated area.

Latex Paint

and

you miss this step, your paint

If

be

will

made

in

toxic,

any

wood,

raw

concrete,

plaster,

resins found

alcohol-based and dries very

Shellac

right

will

wood

paint finish unless you seal

primer cre-

ish

the

in

Latex paint vinyl

water-based,

is

more

better the quality, the

paint contains. Latex paint

acrylic the

tinted to your

is

color choice at the paint or hardware store

using a recipe of concentrated color

both water- and oil-soluble. The

same

are used to color both types of paint.

achieve the desired depth of color.

generally sold by the quart or gallon.

is

available

latex varieties;

alkyd,

in acrylic,

each one has

its

PROS

Fairly

It

is

odorless

Dilutes with water

new

Wash brushes and

soap

tools with

and water

drywall, as an oil-based (alkyd) primer will

make

tints

and

specific

uses. Latex primer must be used over

pig-

ments, called universal colorants, that are

reduce the number of coats required to

Primer

The

or acrylic resins.

Dries quickly; you can prime and

the drywall's surface bumpy.

new wood, use based primer

will

raise the grain,

Thanks

to

possible

alkyd

soak

specifically

primer,

as water-

into the

wood and

paint 2 coats

in

manufacturing,

its

to

cover

Hundreds

CONS

Dries too fast for

example, you no longer need to remove

all

the old varnish from a table or chair

before you repaint,

if

you use the proper

can

in

choose from

paint and

some

decorative

finishes unless a glazing liquid

is

added Will

of hard work;

for

it

hardware stores

surfaces. These primers are wonderful lot

so

Inexpensive

ceramics, laminates, and most other shiny

because they save you a

of colors to

Readily available

it's

metals,

elasticity is better

accommodate weather changes

to buy high-adhesion primers

designed

one day

in

Preferable for exterior painting as

making an uneven surface.

advances

now

For

not adhere to oil-based paint or

shiny surface

Oil

Paint (Alkyd) Due

this paint

is

to

smooth and easy

its

oil

base,

to apply

GETTING STARTED

and

33


covers the surface well.

It

is

tinted to your

PROS

color choice at the store using a recipe of

universal colorants.

available

is

It

pints,

in

CONS

quarts, and gallons.

PROS

Excellent coverage

Has the delayed drying time necessary for

some

You do your own mixing, and the color is pure Authentic colors for faux marbles and tortoiseshell Some colors are extremely toxic Can only mix with oil-based paint (alkyd) and oil-based glazing liquid Expensive

decorative finishes

Can be applied over water-based

Ceiling Paint

Ceiling paint

is

a less-

paint

Readily available

CONS

in

paint and hard-

ware stores Strong odor

expensive, lower-quality paint that in

Dries slowly, each coat takes

matte or

latex or alkyd, with a

comes

flat finish

perfect for ceilings. But marks and finger-

24

show up

prints

hours

easily,

so never use ceiling

Dilutes with paint thinner, never

paint on walls. You cannot apply a paint

water Cleans up with paint thinner

finish over ceiling paint is

Artist's Acrylic Paint

Artist's acrylics

because the paint

extremely porous, and the paint finish

will

sink into the surface.

are sold by the tube and have the consis-

tency of toothpaste. For decorative painting they are

more often used

to tint the

Spray Paint

and alkyd paints,

Acrylic

metallic finishes, faux stone finishes, lac-

glazing liquid. They are best used for pro-

quers, and urethanes are

jects such as a faux tortoiseshell finish,

spray cans.

When

where pure colors lend an

ing gives a

smooth

ity

air of

authentic-

in

applied carefully, sprayfinish, free of brush-

build

range of colors including burnt umber, raw sienna, cobalt blue,

up color one thin layer at a time.

Full

thalo green, and metallics

PROS

Good coverage

for difficult jobs such as wicker furniture Saves time when working on large

Dilutes with water

Dries to a hard, scrubbable surface

CONS

available

strokes, and the fine mist allows you to

to the effect.

PROS

now

Expensive Not economical for large areas Dries quickly unless added to water-

based glazing

stencils

CONS

Toxic

—the paint mist becomes

air-

borne; wear a mask, and keep

animals and small children away cover up areas you don't

liquid

Messy

—

want painted

Artist's tubes of

Oil

thick,

Paint

Artist's

oils

are

creamy, concentrated color.

Professional painters use these oils to mix their

to

own colors by adding small amounts

an oil-based paint or glazing

liquid.

Unless you are familiar with the basics of color blending, this

is

a difficult

way

the color you want.

34

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

to get

Powder Powders als to color

nish.

are used by profession-

any type of paint, glaze, or

The color

is

very concentrated, so

you don't need much. for

var-

I

use powders only

mixing metallic colors

like gold, silver,

and bronze. They are beautiful mixed with either

oil-

or water-based glazing liquid.


PROS

and also allows you

Inexpensive

stencil,

Endless variety of colors with any type of paint or

move the

to pick

up and

stencil along the surface without

Can mix

smearing the work you have just com-

glazing liquid

CONS

Toxic

—you must wear a mask when

mixing Difficult to

and add

pleted. You can also layer colors

shading immediately. Choose a quick-dry-

get the color you want

without a thorough understanding

ing paint, or

of the basics of color blending

sticks

some

made

of the

creams

purpose.

for this

or paint If

you're

stenciling with latex paint or liquid stencil

Milk Paint Milk

paint

is

a mixture of milk

and color

protein, calcium, limestone, clay,

pigments extracted from berries, coal, and seeds;

sold

is

it

in

powder form that

then mixed with water.

In

is

North America,

milk paints were blended by settlers with

paint, it's important to

keep your

brush as dry as possible. This

done by dipping your brush

is

stencil

easily

into the paint

and then swirling the brush on a paper towel to remove the excess paint.

The specialty paints and

listed

below are

all

the natural resources they had on hand,

available

and used to add color to wood furniture.

as many hardware stores.

Colors are limited to an authentic historic

Japan Paints These are a favorite with pro-

subdued greens, blues,

in

craft

stencil stores as well

reds,

fessional stencilers. They are oil-based but

browns, grays, black, and white. Milk paint

dry immediately, they're durable, and they

should be applied only to raw wood for

can be applied with brush or sponge.

palette of

best results;

it

is

not

recommended

for

PROS

exterior painting.

PROS

Durable

Good choice

of colors

Applies over

all

Nontoxic

Binds to wood fibers, giving long to the finish

life

CONS

can leak under used correctly

Liquid,

Gives an authentic historic effect to reproduction furniture Is available in pure vintage colors Limited availability through

is

not

high-gloss

Adds opaque color

CONS

types of paint as

long as the surface

stencil

if

not

Patience required to build color and

shading Cleans up with paint thinner

some

and hardware stores Does not cover up marks or stains

Creams and Crayons These are

Needs

with a semisolid consistency that trans-

craft, paint,

a topcoat of oil, wax, or urethane for protection Cannot be applied over other paint,

lates

into

no leakage under the stencil.

They should be applied with a stencil brush.

stain, or varnish

Creams and crayons dry Stencil Paint You can use most kinds of

diately,

so you

paint for stenciling, including spray paint.

shading

right

The key to successful stenciling

stencil

the color

in

prevents

paint from

oil-based,

is

to apply

a dry or near-dry state. This

seeping under the

may

to the touch

build

imme-

up colors and

away, and easily remove the

and replace

it

when

creating a bor-

der without smudging. They can take several

days to cure or dry completely.

GETTING STARTED

35


PROS

Nontoxic Spill-proof

A

little

oil-based.

Read the manufacturer's instructions

for

the proper application procedure and washing

of colors

Cleans up with paint thinner Take a few days to cure

Sold

Craft Stencil Paints

these are

some

are water-based,

goes a long way

Good range

CONS

Some

phosphorescent shades.

and

metallics

Durable once cured Can be applied to fabric Can be applied over any type of paint as long as it is not high-gloss

in

paint

on

a

Don't use water-based

fabric

normally

that

poorly to water, such as

reacts

silk.

craft stores,

water-based paints that

liquid,

instructions.

PROS

Ideal for stenciling

and painting on

fabric

dry faster than latex paint. They are the

Comes

most common paints used by

Washable

stencilers.

in

many

colors

(follow manufacturer's

instructions)

PROS

Use with stencil brush or sponge Good selection of colors

CONS

Paint can leak under stencil

CONS

Not removable once applied May fade after many washings

Dries fast if

GLAZES

not

used correctly Not good for scrubbable areas unless you varnish over

Glazing liquid, or glaze coat, has two pur-

poses. By adding a glazing

it

liquid to paint,

you slow down the drying time, so you can

Ceramic Paint onto

ceramic

Made

pottery,

tiles,

ceramic paints are sold craft

stores.

Some

must be heated

in

for

in

application

and

urns,

small bottles at

once painted,

tiles,

in

the

into

whatever design or

When

finish

you choose.

creating faux marble, a colored glaze

applied to a tabletop

will

give you time to

a potter's oven or kiln to

cure the color, and the paint colors

change

manipulate and blend the colored glaze

heating

process.

will

Other

ceramic paints do not require heating, but are not safe to use on dishes that you eat or drink from, and do not stand up well

washed

or scrubbed.

if

Read the manufac-

turer's instructions carefully.

PROS

Great decorative accent for ceramics, and can be used for painting and stenciling

Use

CONS

stencil

brush or sponge

Fairly durable,

but better for areas

away from moisture

Fabric Paint

Decorative fabric paints

come

in

36

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

a wide range of colors, including

for making a tinted glaze can vary, depending on the requirements of the glaze. A good guide is half paint and half glazing liquid, plus enough thinner to give the con-

The amounts required

sistency of syrup. If the surface is vertical (e.g., a 'wall), the glaze will need to be thicker than if you are working on a flat surface (e.g., a tabletop). If you add more glazing liquid, the mixture becomes more translucent; if you add more paint, the misture becomes thicker and more opaque.


In

WATER-BASED GLAZE

the past, double-boiled linseed

was most commonly used as

WATER-BASED PAINT (LATEX OR ACRYLIC) WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID WATER MIXING CONTAINER

medium, and

it

is

oil

a glazing

being used today.

still

Although beautiful to work with, there are

disadvantages with this particular takes a long time to

STIR STICK

days,

yellows, and

it

It

often several

dry, it

oil.

cannot be mixed

with water-based paint. Today's oil-based

glazing liquid has the look and consistency

whereas water-based glazing

of custard, liquid

looks

like milk.

pletely clear,

But both dry com-

and when added to paint

change the color

of the paint very

They are usually available lon

cans

at

oil

quart and gal-

in

hardware stores.

Commercial glazes were with an

little.

first

made up

base, and could be mixed only

OIL-BASED GLAZE OIL PAINT (ALKYD)

create the background drifts and veining

reminiscent of real marble. Glazing liquid

mixed with paint also turns the color from

opaque tinted

to translucent.

to

you apply a

glaze (glaze that has

or colored

been added

When

OIL-BASED GLAZING LIQUID PAINT THINNER OR TURPENTINE (TURPENTINE IS PURER AND MORE EXPENSIVE) MIXING CONTAINER STIR STICK

the paint color of your

choice) over a base coat, the base color will

show through

For example,

this translucent layer.

glaze

yellow-tinted

over a white base coat

will

give the surface

several shades of yellow. Not tive

paint finishes

example, finishes

require in

ragged

all

decora-

a glaze;

for

which the paint

is

applied directly onto the surface, such as

sponging and ragging on, need only latex paint and water. However,

if

the paint must

be manipulated to create the effect, as required

in

ragging

off,

marbling,

combing, you must use a glazing

is

and

liquid.

GETTING STARTED

37


with larity

oil

paints. Now.

of the

because

of the popu-

more environmentally sensitive

the can. but dries clear; oil-based varnish looks golden and

will

yellow with time.

water-based paint products, water-based

Varnish on Walls There

glazes are readily available. Most paint

need to apply a protective coat of varnish

fin-

On a

ishes can be achieved easily by using

to a painted wall.

water-based paints and glazes. Keep

orative painted finish on

mind that different brands vary

and

ing time:

ment and

it

in

in

their dry-

might be best to experi-

find the glaze that suits your

needs before you begin a

of the glaze

usually no

is

wall that

has a dec-

the properties

it,

used to create that

finish offer

adequate protection. the finish

If

has been created with

thinned-down latex paint instead of glaze,

big project.

as would be the case with colorwashing, a

VARNISHES

protective coating should be applied, espe-

There are many different types of varnish

cially in a

and many different names on the market,

able to use a water-based varnish.

which can lead to

may be more

some

familiar with urethane, poly-

varnish well with a stick; do not shake the

sake

I

will

use the term varnish var-

nish has two distinct purposes. First,

and scratches; second,

comes

in

it

adds a sheen to

Varnish,

effect.

it

bumps

protects the painted surface from

painted

prefer-

It's

Application Before using, always stir the

throughout this book. Adding a coat of

the

or kitchen.

confusion. You

urethane. clear coat, or topcoat, but for clarity's

bathroom

paint,

like

several sheens from matte to

high-gloss (see page

39

for descriptions of

the sheens available).

can or bubbles

form, which can cause

Use a

a spotty finish on your surface.

sponge brush

or low-pile roller to avoid

leaving brush marks.

Varnish on Painted Furniture and

Accessories tive

Furniture,

lamps, decora-

accessories, or any items that are

expected to withstand regular wear and tear

some-

require varnish for protection and

times

Water-based and acrylic varnishes are

will

for

sheen. For example, a table with a

faux marble top and ragged legs would need

suitable for finishes that have been cre-

at least

ated with water-based paint. They share

the top. for protection and to give

the best qualities of any water-based prod-

sheen of

—they dry quickly and are odorless. But

two coats of high-gloss varnish on

real

it

the

marble. The ragged legs would

uct

need just one coat of varnish

for protection

most important, they do not yellow as

and the sheen could be

semigloss, or

readily as oil-based varnishes, ability to

dry clear

makes

all

and

their

high-gloss.

the difference

Application

to your painted finish, as yellowing will distort the colors

sen

so

and shades you have cho-

carefully.

Water-based

varnish

cannot be used over oil-based painted

fin-

ishes. Water-based varnish looks milky

38

DEBBIE TRAVIS" PAINTED HOUSE

in

flat,

Working on small areas

like fur-

niture is relatively easy. There are special

varnish brushes available, but

I

prefer dis-

posable foam brushes, as they are easy to use.

come

sive,

and do not leave brush marks.

in

different sizes, are inexpen-


Keep the area you're varnishing

as

in

dust-free as possible. For a perfect finish,

Sheens and Finishes

sand the surface with the finest sandpaThe sheen

per or steel wool between coats.

If

you wet

down the area before sanding, you won't get scratch marks. This

is

known as wet

and dry sanding. Make sure each coat of varnish

is

completely dry before sanding.

Varnish on Painted Floors As are a high-traffic area,

all

floors

painted floors

come from

it's

paint, glaze, or varnish. Paint

for protection.

with three to five coats

Stained or painted floors

your last coat, whether

manu-

own names for difsheens, although most vary from

facturers have their ferent

matte or

flat to pearl or velvet to

semi-

and high-gloss. Note: The less sheen your finish offers,

the less you

must be varnished

on your surface

or gloss

will

will

see imperfections; a

high-sheen finish shows every

drip,

crack, and brushstroke.

look elegant and rich with a high-gloss var-

MATTE

EGGSHELL

whitewashes, and stenciling, use a satin

a flat finish

also called satin,

or semigloss varnish for protection. Water-

not very durable,

based and

marks easily

country-style

For

nish.

painted

floors,

acrylic varnishes are the best

for finishes that

have been painted with

water-based paint: They dry quickly, are

pearl, velvet

absorbs

subtle sheen

good

light,

very popular for

for hiding imperfec-

walls as

tions

too shiny, not

odorless, and do not yellow. Water-based

it's

not

too flat

used mainly on

varnishes cannot be used over oil-based

ideal for mixing

ceilings

with glazing liquid

painted finishes.

The topcoat you choose the sheen on your

floor:

A

will

determine

SEMIGLOSS

easy

flat

sheen

most commonly used for woodwork,

HIGH-GLOSS

will

disguise uneven textures or flaws better, a

trim,

sheen adds depth

high

and furniture

reflects light, so sur-

highlights a

Application

It

smooth surface. is

best to water down the

first

two coats of varnish, applying a very thin layer

Most varnishes were designed

go

to

over wood, and yellowing wasn't an issue.

But

if

you are applying varnish over

light

color,

shade,

yellowing

will

distort

the

so use a varnish that dries clear.

and doors

ing

are very visible

because

of its

high durability

semigloss latex is

also used on

an ideal

base coat

interior doors,

for

painted finishes

baseboards, and

that require a great

trim

deal of manipulation such as faux

paint

for exterior paint-

face marks or cracks

paint

and building up from there.

wipe clean

commonly used

and

to your finish

to

marbles and toiseshell

;

tor-

it

is

reflects light, so any surface marks or cracks are very visible

easier to manipuNote: Because of its size, achieving a smooth finish is not easy on a floor. You may save time and money by having a professional do this final step for you.

late a glaze on a

adds depth

shiny surface

your finish

easy

easy to wipe clean

to

wipe clean

to

GETTING STARTED

39


Brushes and Tools PROFESSIONAL

ALTERNATIVE

DRAGGING BRUSH Long-haired brush about

or 5

4

long. Very thick bristles, usually horsehair, that

leave drag marks

in

long-hair bristle brush

(IB)

the paint. (1A)

BADGER-HAIR SOFTENING BRUSH Made from badger's extremely soft (the same bristles as used in men's shaving brushes). Very expensive, but ideal

soft bristle brush (2B)

fur,

for softening or clouding the paint faux marble. (2A)

in

finishes like

STIPPLING BRUSH Square-shaped, flat-ended brush with medium coarse bristles. The handle is set at a right angle to the brush, and rotates. Used to stipple large surfaces. Comes in a variety of sizes from 3 square to 8" square. Expensive. (3A)

wide bristle brush (3B)

VARNISHING BRUSH Long-haired, natural bristle brush. Designed not to leave brushstrokes in the varnish.

sponge brush (4B)

Expensive. (4A) FITCH Natural bristles, long handle, variety of widths from

W

to 2

comes

Used

".

in a

for detail

standard 1

paintbrush

(5E)

work and corners. (5A.B.C)

RUBBER COMB Triangular-shaped each side has wood

different-sized teeth. Originally used for

graining or faux bois.

Commonly used

for

homemade comb,

cut

from foam core (6C)

creating

combed patterns. (6A) METAL COMB Available in various sizes. Used woodgraining or faux bois. (6B)

for

flat-edged hair

comb

SEA SPONGE Large natural sponge with irregular holes that create a broken paint effect. Must be

kitchen sponge made irregular by tearing bits

damp when used. (7A.B.C)

off

SWORD

LINER Small brush, 4

long, with soft bristles

that are V2" wide at the base and tapered to V16" at

the

tip.

Used

feather, thin artist's

brush (8B.8C)

for veins in faux marble. (8A)

STENCIL BRUSH Flat-ended brush used for stippling or swirling the paint onto a stencil. Available in a variety of sizes. (9A.B.C)

kitchen sponge (9D)

RAG Soft fabric used for creating an imprint in the glaze. Be sure to use only lint-free material. (10)

old T-shirts

ARTIST'S BRUSH There are

many

sizes from 1"

down

to just a few bristles for fine work. Price varies

according to quality of bristles, sable being the most expensive. (11A.B.C)

40

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

make the

best rags

any narrow paintbrush


BRUSHES AND TOOLS

ever, for every specialty tool, there is

FOR THE DECORATIVE PAINTER

alternative that can be found inexpensively

While there are

many types

brushes on the market,

of tools and

surprisingly, pro-

fessional tools have changed very

over the years.

If

special brush,

it

I

had to invest

in

little

just

one

would have to be a bad-

ger-hair softening brush.

Even

never painted before, the effects

if

you've

you'll

get

from using this brush are just incredible. you can, in

definitely preferable to invest

it's

professional tools. They'll always

each job easier, and finish.

And

rectly,

they

If

if

will

make

give you the best

you clean and store them cor-

will

last

you a lifetime. How-

in

paint or hardware

your neighborhood

and

store,

I've listed

an

it

here alongside

its

professional counterpart. And often you can

make some sticks,

of the tools yourself.

also called sponge brushes,

cheap alternatives especially

away

good

to paint

are

brushes and are

for varnishing.

Throw them

after using.

Cleanup of the

Sponge

If

you're going to invest

in

some

marvelous brushes that are used

for

specialty finishes, or even ordinary paint-

brushes,

it's

important that they are looked

after so they will

have a long

life.

GETTING STARTED

After

41


being used

with

oil

or

alkyd

paint

all

brushes should be cleaned with mineral spirits (paint thinner),

thoroughly

is

washed

and when the paint

removed they should be

warm water and soap.

with

After

being used with water-based or latex paint,

brushes should be cleaned with soap

all

and warm water.

The professional brushes used

for soft-

ening finishes such as faux marble get hard very quickly

when you

are working

with a water-based paint or glazing liquid. If

you feel the tips of the brush getting

hard after about twenty minutes, rinse the

brush under running water, shake

it

out,

and carry on. If

you are not sure of the composition of

the product you are working with, check the label or ask a salesperson what sol-

vent

is

required to clean your brushes and

other equipment.

Storage When

the brushes are thor-

oughly cleaned and dried, they should be stored properly, either hung bristles

from a pegboard or in

newspaper or

that

all

laid flat

and wrapped

craft paper. This

the bristles

will

down

ensures

stay perfectly

aligned and that the brushes

will

be ready

for your next project.

Protect wooden moldings and trim with masking tape. Use low-tack tape over any painted surfaces. Cover floors and furnishings 'with drop cloths.

new

finish

could peel right

likes the preparation stage,

Preparation Preparation

is

sional results.

critical If

off.

No one

and you may

be tempted to skip over parts, but to

ensure profes-

you skip steps or take

long run you'll save time and

in

the

money by

being well prepared.

shortcuts along the way to speed up the job, final

you

will

only be disappointed with the

results. For

example,

if

you skipped

CREATING A SAFE WORK SPACE •

Take the time to create a safe working

the primer and applied latex paint over an

environment, giving yourself room to move

old oil-based painted wall, your beautiful

freely. All furniture

42

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

should be cleared out


Keep small children and animals

at a

safe distance. •

Whenever possible, work

light, in

or invest

most

natural

in

painter's lights, available

in

paint stores. Painter's lights are

available as clip-ons or freestanding. They

shed a uniform your progress

so that you can see

light

when you are creating

a

decorative painted finish. •

Remove

all

and hard-

electrical plates

ware before you

start.

your plates are

If

them out on

plain white, lay

a sheet of

newspaper and apply the same

much

the wall. They'll look in

with your

Always

new

use

available

as

finish

better blended

finish.

low-tack

tape,

painter's

hardware stores, when taping

in

onto dry, freshly painted walls. Masking tape

will pull

off the

base coat, and some-

times even the plaster. •

Wear gloves

save your hands. Med-

gloves are the best, and can be

ical latex

bought

to

bulk.

in

Have the

tools, paints,

and review

at hand,

all

and glazes close

instructions before

you begin. of the way. You'll

need space to move a

When

sanding,

it's

important to wear a

mask and goggles

ladder around the room, and you won't

dust

have time to push the furniture aside as

eyes and lungs from airborne particles.

you go.

Cover floors with painter's drop cloths.

When working

ders,

it

is

to

protect your

with spray paint or pow-

essential to wear a

mask

for pro-

These are a good investment as they are

tection from airborne toxic particles. For

reusable and paint won't seep through.

small jobs there are filtered

on the floor

Plastic

to walk on,

is

slippery and unsafe

and paint

will

seep through

Cover any furnishings

left in

with old sheets or plastic covers. •

Work

that

are effective for a short time (one day). For larger projects, or

when working

with toxic

fumes such as those released by some

paper. •

masks

in

a well-ventilated area.

the room

paint strippers, there are

more

sophisti-

cated masks with charcoal

filters

that you

can change as they

fill

up.

GETTING STARTED

43


PREPARING WALLS

you can see where the patch

composed

Interior walls are

one

of

or a

or

add more

els

smooth

wood

veneer, or

wood panels. You can

stucco to freshen

up,

it

wood,

stucco,

drywall,

paint over

sand down

Prepare wood wall pan-

and wood trim the same way you do

combination of the following materials: plaster,

filler.

is,

furniture (see

Sanding

It

is

pages 47-48).

important to sand any sur-

or intentionally

face that has a high gloss before applying

aged appear-

primer or paint. For an even finish, use a

give your stuccoed walls an

and work

ance (see Painting Stucco, pages 87-89).

sanding

block

Veneer paneling can be painted. But

motion.

Don't forget the trim

first,

any holes or cracks as you would dry-

fix

bond

in

woodwork. Sandpaper comes

a

in

circular

and the different

to dirt,

gauges. Your paint store salesperson

have to

be able to show you which gauges suit

prepare any surface before you apply a

your needs. After you have sanded, wipe

wall. Paint will not stick or

grease, or a shiny surface. You

paint finish.

The aim

is

existing surface so the

onto

will

to roughen up the

new

paint can grab

down the

walls with a

Cleaning Remove loose cloth or brush, or

with

To remove paper from walls,

dirt with a soft

vacuum

down greasy walls

or cloth.

Allow to dry thoroughly.

Wallpaper

it.

damp mop

will

gently.

TSP

Wash

(trisodium

phosphate), and rinse. Do not wash unpainted plaster or raw wood.

Repairs: peeling paint, cracks, and

holes Scrap away any

loose, peeling, or

bubbled paint with a scraper, stopping

where fectly

old paint is holding fast. For a per-

smooth surface, you

a thin coat of

filler

will

have to add

or caulking

compound

to the bare spots to eliminate the ridges

where scraped surface meets

Sand when

dry,

using

old paint.

medium sand

Finish off with fine grit paper.

paper.

Brush away

any loose paint and debris from holes and cracks. Moisten the edges slightly and with

caulking

compound. Apply two

three coats of caulking, allowing

between coats, as

when dry to

see

if

it

is

to dry

A good test

smooth

is

to apply

a coat of primer over the patched area.

44

or

can shrink. Sand

with fine sandpaper.

the surface

it

fill

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

If

Dark glaze was ragged over

'wallpaper to create

this unusual testured effect.


wet down the paper with hot water

enough moisture soaks through

until

to soften

scrape away the paper.

the glue, then

There are solutions you can buy that

will

speed up the process, and you can also steamer that

rent a

will

are tackling an entire

many a

cloths

protect

is

always

from the

your floors

Some papers

water.

removing

or

will

peel off dry, but

leave a thin paper backing on the wall. This will

peel as soon as you paint

be removed before you a

sponge and scrape

is off,

is

it

must

Dampen

start.

off. After all

with

the paper

wash down the walls thoroughly

remove any glue residue, and It

so

it,

to

let dry.

possible to paint over wallpaper, as

long as

is

it

it

take a few weeks to

will

Ask the salesperson for your surface. if

there

thick enough. Test first to

Painting or staining floors

design, this

see the

the wallpaper has a raised

will

make an

interesting pat-

manent than painted to

craft paper,

a

diamond

the

proportions

often

for

marked

plaster, or

wood, and the caulking or

compound used step,

this

you

for repairs. will

will

If

you miss

coat,

as the

be absorbed unevenly. There are

excellent primers on the market will

filler

get spotty coverage

when you apply your base paint

drywall,

now

that

adhere to almost any surface. Acrylic

primer

will

cover old oil-based paint, shiny

it

or fur-

cost. Paint

adds

damaged wooden

disguises repairs that

The easiest

wood

floor

life

to badly

floors

and

stains would

surface to paint

wood; you can also paint concrete and

subfloors, as well as linoleum, as long as

properly prepared.

is

not

or

un-

prepared linoleum floors as the paint

will

is

not adhere well. is

tile,

When

completed and

ceramic,

the painted design

dry,

have between three and nish for

It

all

floors

five

should

coats of var-

sheen and, most important, good

protection.

Sanding old

wood

Your

step when reviving an

first

floor will

be to remove any wax,

dirt, old paint, stain,

and varnish from the

and wood. You

planks. There are sanding machines you

within a couple of hours,

can rent that do a wonderful job and save

latex paint, vinyl wallpaper,

can paint over

is

can dramatically transform a

little

or

the

tackle

more work than painting walls

advisable to paint

new

you

and

Although painting floors

actual floor.

Priming The primer coat seal the porous surface of

of

a stenciled border,

before

the surface

applied to

it's

roll

give you an idea of the effect

will

ture and finishes over wallpaper. is

walls. It's advisable

pattern, a faux tiled floor, or

This

is

tex-

whether

per-

even a geometric design done with a stain.

washing, sponging, stenciling, or stamping

add interesting

needed,

draw out a plan of the design on a

intensify.

will

is

and decorated floors are often more

tern under a coat of paint. Ragging, color-

are techniques that

often a scary

is

prospect, as good preparation

room

if

no need to prime

is

PREPARING FLOORS

cause

seams, but

There

been done.

repairs have

niture, they

to peel off. You will always

for the correct primer

already a base coat and no

is

ensure that the weight of the paint won't it

cure.

fully

you

if

so put down canvas drop

job,

to

room

Removing wallpaper

layers.

messy

save time

but

GETTING STARTED

45


wear and tear on your knees. But read the

Use

instructions carefully. or you will

dent the wood. Generally, you

will

need

a gentle touch

to

go over the surface twice,

once with a heavy- and then with

a light-

is

a

messy

all

and window treatments from the

furniture

Keep cleanup

room.

Remove

job.

minimum by

a

to

rooms you are not working

closing off

and close the heating vents

in

on,

the room

Remember

painted finish. floor with

to protect your

two or three coats of varnish. As

long as you follow the instructions you can paint any design you choose.

Cement

grade sandpaper.

Sanding

proceed with your base coats and desired

floors You may paint over con-

crete,

cement, or stone floors

ments

or balconies provided you seal

first.

Sweep up any loose

base-

in

them

and dust,

dirt

then apply one or two coats of acrylic primer over the dry surface.

where you are sanding. Always use a mask

when sanding; the dust

particles can be

harmful.

Finishing a piece of furniture with a fresh,

Cleaning for a

Allow the sanding dust to settle

few hours, then sweep up dust and

damp mop.

wipe the floor clean with a

Al-

Repairs

Use wood

a wonderful

is

add personality to any room cost.

at very

There are stores that furniture

if

way

sell

to

little

ready-

you want to

any

buy new pieces. Or build your own tables,

Sand smooth

with

shelves, and storage cabinets using the

fill

sandpaper and wipe

down.

wealth of great ideas and materials

in

today's do-it-yourself marketplace.

Priming Apply an

Secondhand

alkyd or acrylic primer

to seal the

wood. Water

wood from

a latex primer and raise the

wood

effect

in

to

filler

large holes or cracks. or fine-grade

new painted

made unpainted

low to dry thoroughly.

medium-

FURNITURE

will

soak

into the

furniture

can

be

easily

found at yard sales, junk shops, and flea markets,

perhaps

or

you

have

some

pieces that you've inherited. These old

grain.

Linoleum floors

It

is

possible to paint

over old linoleum floors, but you must pre-

pare the surface properly.

I

recommend

it

finds are often well ally

a bargain.

It's

made,

solid,

and usu-

also great fun scouring

the streets and countryside for unusual

will

finds.

Here are some points to remember

only last for a few years, until you can

when

looking for

as a quick-fix decorating solution that

afford

to

replace the

remove any wax,

dirt,

floor.

Thoroughly

and grease from the

secondhand

furniture to

paint: •

The condition of the paint and varnish

—they are easily removed.

linoleum using TSP, a heavy-duty cleanser

doesn't matter

available at your hardware store,

The color of the piece doesn't matter.

Warped wood

clean with

warm

face to rough

it

water, then up.

When

rinse

sand the

the floor

sur-

is dry,

however

Check

well

it's

will

always stay warped

painted.

drawers and doors.

apply a coat of high-adhesion primer, one

intended for shiny surfaces. Let dry, and

not capable of mending any broken draw-

46

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

all

If

you are


This striking "rug" with a Navajo design was painted over an old white linoleum ers, legs, etc., don't bother with the piece. •

Small cracks are easily

cracks and holes are more •

Look

for a piece that

shape and

fits

in

filled,

but large

difficult.

has an interesting

well with your

home's

Stripping

If

layers

poorly applied, you

piece

down

to

its

of will

floor.

paint

have been

want to

original surface.

strip the

You can

take the piece to a professional and have it

chemically dipped. This saves time, but not always possible, and chemical dip-

decor.

is

Preparing furniture for paint Taking

ping

the time to prepare your surfaces properly,

you may have a repair job on your hands.

be they odd tables, chairs, or other small accessories,

will

how long your

make

all

the difference to

finish will keep.

will

break down the furniture glue, so

There are stripping products on the market that you brush on. They dissolve the paint so that you can scrape

it

away. These

GETTING STARTED

47


commercial strippers can be hazardous,

some

but there are

Always

toxic.

available that are less

wear gloves,

a

suitable

mask, and goggles to protect your eyes.

Work

a

final

buffing.

always sand

in

As much as possible,

the direction of the

grain; this helps to prevent scratch

wood

marks.

well-ventilated

a

in

you go with a tack cloth. Use steel wool for

area.

Another popular method is

heat stripping. You can

rent a heat gun for this pur-

pose, but be careful not to

damage

wood by

the

beneath the

ing the surface

Heat an

paint.

the

until

burn-

area just

begins to

paint

bubble, about 10 seconds,

then scrape off the paint

and

heat

the

direct

to

another area of paint. After

wood

clean the

stripping,

with mineral spirits.

Repair any loose

Repairs

wood

parts with

glue.

holes and cracks with

wood

smooth.

sand

and

filler

Fill

Apply a coat of primer over the

Any

repairs.

be more

spots

will

when

the

Remove clean

it.

primer

all

uneven visible is

hardware and

You may want to buy

new handles, as the ones might not

new

on.

fit in

There

finish.

is

old

with the

a large

selection of hardware on the

market that facelift at

Sanding

will

little

For

add greatly to your furniture

tough

fine or extrafine.

Don't press too hard or you

dents or gouges

cost.

jobs,

medium-grade sandpaper and

48

This yard sale find was transformed with a dragged effect and some freehand painting.

start

with

finish with

Clean away the dust as

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

in

will

cause

the wood.

Primer Apply one or two coats of acrylic primer,

sanding

between coats.

lightly

with

steel

wool


Priming

Professional Tips for Painting If

one step you

a bit daunting, but

at a time

if

you take

it

section for the correct primer to use.

it

haven't done so already,

and don't rush the job,

PREPARATION OF THE SURFACE

Paint

not adhere to

will

you

furniture

drop cloths. Give yourself as

painter's

to

move around as

possible.

Professional Tips for Painting Furniture

and cracks must

or a shiny surface. Holes

be

grease, wax,

dirt,

move

If

and carpets out of the room, and put down

much space

every project, follow these steps.

1.

sur-

painted finish. Refer to the Preparation

be delighted with the results. For

will

ensure that you have a uniform

it

face over which to apply the base coat and

Rooms

you have never painted a room before,

may seem

will

an important step because

is

and sanded smooth, then the

filled

must be cleaned. Refer

entire surface

to

how

Preparation, pages 44-45, for tips on

BEFORE YOU BUY Secondhand

furniture

is

a great

way

to

home inexpensively. But make sure any damage is repairable. Paint

furnish a

to

prepare different types of surfaces.

Repair and prepare the surface well, and the rest of the job

go smoothly and

will

your finished effect

have a profes-

will

sional look.

won't cover up large gouges and cracks or replace a missing leg.

PREPARE BEFORE PAINTING Refer to the section on preparing niture (see

PRIMING

are

When you have completed you

will

need

the preparation,

to apply a coat of primer

your surface

if

is

is

to go over shiny surfaces, so

no need to sand off

nish or paint if

if

it's in

all

the old var-

good condition.

(a)

you are painting onto raw wood, plaster, or drywall, or (b)

made

there

fur-

Note that high-adhesion primers

to paint.

2.

wood

pages 46-48) before you begin

oil-based,

and you are going to be working with water-

CHAIRS For best results, turn the chair upside

and paint the legs

first,

down

working toward the

seat, and then paint the seat bottom. You

based paints. You cannot put water-based paint over an oil-based paint

not adhere and

will

—the paint

peel off

when

will

it's dry.

can use either a

bristle or

but a bristle paintbrush

sponge brush,

will

get into

crevices and around spindles better. Once

the legs are dry, turn the chair right side up

Here's a

tip

base coat

on how to judge is

oil-based

if

your original

and paint the back, then the seat

last.

or water-based:

Apply a small patch of water-based paint to

CHEST OF DRAWERS Take out the drawers and paint them

the wall

in

question and

let

it

dry overnight;

then, with your thumbnail, try to scratch off

the paint.

If

base coat

is oil,

it

lifts

off easily, your original

separately. in

the holes

will

need

to apply

if

the handles, and

fill

you are replacing the hard-

ware. Either buy new handles or renew the old

and you

Remove

ones

to

enhance the new painted

finish on the chest.

a coat of primer.

GETTING STARTED

49


BASE COAT

3.

This

step 1

is

boards after sanding, painting, or staining in

the instructions for most

of the painted finishes. You

the walls are white already, you

If

may be tempted

to skip the

base coat and

apply a finish such as colorwashing right

over the old paint. But

remember

that you

will

be using a tinted glaze or diluted paint

for

the

painted

and these are

effect,

translucent, so any dark

smudges

or lines

show through.

will

lowing this method you

will

onto finished work. Here

is

when

5.

PROTECTIVE TOPCOAT

You must apply varnish to walls only

when

diluted water-based paint has

fol-

avoid dripping

the order to

fol-

painting an entire room:

(a)

been

applied as a painted finish, for example,

colorwashing or fresco, and traffic

areas such as hallways, or

with lots of moisture like

kitchens. Unless you

high-

(b) in in

rooms

bathrooms and

want a shiny surface,

always apply a matte varnish which

Always work from the top down. By

low

floor.

want to

will

apply two coats of latex paint for best results.

the

invisible

when

dry. It's there only for pro-

tection. Floors always

need three

protective coats of varnish. to leave

them

is

for a

week

And

after

it

to five is

best

you have

fin-

ished the job before moving furniture back

ceiling walls

doors and trim floor

PAINTED FINISH

4.

Complete the base coats on the and walls ish.

If

first,

ceiling

then do your painted

fin-

your doors and trim are to be plain

paint, apply a fresh coat of paint to

areas when everything else

is

these

done.

If

you are applying a finish to the doors and trim, for

example, faux marble or drag-

ging, apply the

base coat

at the

same

time as the base coat for the walls. The last

stage

will

be the painted effect on

the door and trim.

The is

the

last floor.

This unusual faux finish door has been pro-

surface to be painted or stained If

the floor needs to be sanded,

do this after the walls are painted, as

it's

tected with two coats of varnish. into the

room, so they can dry thoroughly

and harden. They

will feel

—within

dry to the touch

a few hours, but the

far easier to dust off the finished walls

very quickly

than to protect a newly sanded floor from

first

ladder scrapes and paint drips.

cure because varnish dries from the top-

Note: Be prepared to touch up the base-

50

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

coat (varnish) takes several days to

coat down.


PREPARE When

PRIME

BASE COAT

painting, always

1.

Repair and sand

2.

Prime

all

all

TOP COAT

PAINTED FINISH

work from the top down. the surfaces: ceiling, walls, trim, and doors.

areas that have been repaired and any raw surface

—wood

or drywall. 3.

Paint and finish ceilings

4.

Paint base coats and painted effect on walls.

5.

When

6.

The

HOW You

walls are completely dry, paint trim and doors.

last

surface to be painted or stained

TO APPLY PAINT want

will

to

use a

If

cover large

it

the

difficult to paint a

floor.

rolling a floor,

to the other,

clean edge,

and move toward the door.

TAPE There are different types of tape available

masking

off selected areas you

then tape off the side you want to protect

for

with a suitable tape (see below).

protect from paint.

Don't overload your brush or paint.

and

It

roller

Although

marks when the paint it's

will

Working

thinner.

be smoother

more perfect with two

rather than

is

tempting to get the job over

with quickly, your surface

and

roller with

easier to avoid drips and brush

is

thin

coats

one thick coat. in

in

parallel

bands

using slightly crisscrossed strokes so that roller lines

are eliminated. Work from the

center of the section out so that the edges aren't repeatedly being loaded with fresh paint.

Smooth out the

ter point

When

paint from the cen-

toward the edges. rolling

Low-tack painter's tape paint

when tape

must use for in It's

is

will

not

when

any of the instructions

when you

pull off

to

fresh

being removed. You

painter's tape

makes

reusable, which

want

it

in it

is

called

this book.

economical

are doing a large room, and

will

give you a professional finish.

sections of approximately 3

feet by 3 feet, apply paint

work from one side

painting a

in,"

next to trim and corners with a brush.

you find

is

When

roller to

areas. But begin by "cutting line

first.

the ceiling,

use a pole

Regular masking tape painter's tape, and

is

is

much good

stickier than

for protecting

the edges of floors or shiny woodwork or glass, will

where the low-tack

painter's tape

not adhere.

If you can't find low-tack tape, use masking tape but remove some of the stickiness by pressing a strip of tape onto a carpet or your clothing.

TIPS:

Smear some petroleum jelly around the of window glass or mirrors before you paint. Paint drips will wipe away easily, as the

edges extender. You falling

will

on you, and

be able to avoid drips it's

easier to

make

long

paint won't stick to a greasy surface. This step will

even strokes.

save you from taping

off

each pane

of

glass.

GETTING STARTED

51


C

H

A

P

T

F

R

FOUR MASTER TECHNIQUES Although hundreds

of effects

can be produced

with paint, most are created by using one or

a combination of the four basic finishes that follow: colorwashing, ragging, sponging, and dragging. Once you've mastered them, you will be able to produce any of the exciting effects in this book, from elegant faux marble,

which

on the ragging techniques, to aged plaster, which colorwashing.

If

you're

new

is

is

based

based on

to paint finishes, try these sim-

ple yet striking painted effects first. Start with colors that

are similar in shade and tone for your base coat and glaze coat, so the effect will be subtle,

and any

mistakes invisible. Soon you'll see how easy

it

is to

paint, glazes,

manipulate and work with

and different

tools,

and be

ready for more challenging projects. The walls in this inviting room have been painted with a simple colorwash over a cream base coat.

52

of yellow

ochre


r


Colorwashing r

2

Colorwashing

1

tressed

PART 5 LATEX domly onto a base coat, a

PART WATER soft textured effect

technique that creates the faded plaster walls.

It's

illusion

of

most commonly

imperfect walls to

disguise

cracks and bumps, but can also be used to

p e

broken-color

or

used on

i

PAINT rAINI

a dis-

is

e c

add interest to smooth drywall

faces. Colorwashing

is

sur-

one of the easiest

ated.

Keep

in

mind that diluted paint

very runny, so this

Make sure well

may be

a

messy

covered

before

you

begin.

will

brushed on

loosely, resulting in a

room, but walls

marks and a gradual

buildup of color. The watered is

translucent, so each coat

one below.

If

one color

is

down

paint

shows the

brushed

ran-

And

splash on the work you've just done,

Colorwashed walls are perfect

variation of brush

job.

always work from the top down, or you

wall finishes: Diluted

is

is

the floors and furniture are

and most effective paint

is cre-

in

in

any

kitchens, bathrooms,

and hallways should be given a coat of matte varnish

for protection. Left, pale

yellow and pink were applied over a white

basecoat.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

PAINTED FINISH:

white latex paint, flat or satin roller, brush, and paint tray

latex paint, satin

1 mixing container 3" or 4" latex brush

paint tray

GETTING STARTED

55


M

Step 3 Working in sections of about 3' x 3' or 4' x 4', apply the diluted paint in random crisscross brushstrokes, keeping a wet edge (see page 72).

Continue to add the wash until

CO

crisscross strokes

in

there are no areas of the base coat showing.

Let dry.

Step 4

If

you're working

in

a bathroom, kitchen, or

hallway, protect your colorwash with a coat of clear

varnish.

TIPS: When you are painting on a large wall, keep a wet edge (page 72) so that you don't

o

o

get join lines. When starting the next section, overlap your strokes by about 1". Always complete one wall before answering the phone or resting.

Colorwashing with Two Colors If

your

want

to

first

colorwash appears too bold, or

add more texture to the

a second colorwash

Shown pink,

INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats

to

and

let

dry for 2

4 hours.

Step 2

Dilute the paint for the

with water until

56

mixed

in

a mixing container

well,

and pour

colorwash paint as indicated,

into a paint tray.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

stir

here:

layer

if

you

simply apply

a

different color.

first

colorwash pale

in

base coat white,

finish,

second colorwash cranberry.


ALTERNATE TECHNIQUE

W>

Colorwashing with a Roller For a large wall this

is

fun,

and very

fast.

short pile roller to apply the colorwash

in

Use

a

criss-

cross strokes. For a subtle effect the base coat

<0

O

u should be only a couple of shades

lighter

than the

colorwashed coat. For a more contemporary and lighthearted look, try bright colors over white. Here

colorwashed the walls in emerald green, and I've added a burgundy border with freehand gold swirls and dots. I

PI

t

GETTING STARTED

57


Ragging Off e c

r

i

p e

PARTS LATEX PAINT SAME SHEEN AS THE BASE COAT) 2 PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING 2

(THE

Ragging off

is

LIQUID

probably 1

the most popular of

base

all

the painted finishes. A glazing liquid

must be added

to the paint

ragging off as the surface

when

you're

must stay wet

long enough for you to manipulate the

glaze with the

rag.

The most subtle

effects are created by using soft free rags

Chamois

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; old

T-shirts are

my

lint-

favorite.

leather (used for waxing cars)

gives the effect of suede, while crumpled plastic gives a

The key

color combinations of the

PART WATER

more defined

to successful ragging

finish. is

the

coat

and

glaze. Soft colors over a white

colored

base

will

give the appearance of old walls. Dark

colors over a lighter tone of the color

will

create a dramatic,

same

elegant

effect. It's best to avoid mixing totally

different colors, as these combinations

usually look too sharp.

Use

latex paint with either a satin

or semigloss sheen; on the opposite

pages, a dark forest green was ragged over a soft sage base coat.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: latex paint, satin or roller,

mixing container

semigloss

brush, and paint tray

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, satin or

paint tray and medium-pile roller 2" brush

approximately 12-inch-square pieces

lots of rags torn into

semigloss

glazing liquid

GETTING STARTED

59


INSTRUCTIONS

TIPS: Never stop halfway down

For the best results, prepare your surface following

the middle, or you

the guidelines

Step 1 Base and

the Preparation section (page 42).

coat: Apply 2 coats of latex paint

dry for 2 to

let

Step 2 Mix pour

in

into the paint tray.

QJQ QjQ

Step 3 Apply the

{Q

the wall and cut

0^

4 hours.

the colored glaze as indicated and

it

is

x

3'.

If

whole wall. Always work from the top down. Tape along the corners of alternate walls, and rag those walls first. When dry, transfer the tape and rag the other two.

colored glaze: Start at the top of in

the edges with glaze, using a

brush. Next, apply the glaze with a roller to an area of about 3'

lines of color.

a wall or in

get dark overlapping this does happen, redo the will

Make sure 100%

of the surface

ALTERNATIVES You can vary the

finish by ragging off the colored

glaze with a variety of tools such as plastic bags,

covered.

chamois

cloths,

and cheesecloths. Practice

ing with the glaze to

are

some examples,

touch

is

different.

exactly the

of

see which look you

same

like.

play-

Below

but remember, everyone's

No two people

finish. That's part of

will

create

the beauty

it.

Ragging with plastic (violet panel) Ragging with chamois leather (dark green panel) Ragging with cheesecloth (cherry panel)

Step 4 Crumple up the rag so it looks like a rose. Step 5 Dab the rag over the wet glaze surface. Keep turning the as

it

rag,

and replace

it

with a dry

one

gets loaded with glaze. Do not overwork the

ragging

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;dab about 70%

of the surface.

Step 6 Move

to the next section

glaze with the

roller.

previously ragged area.

Rag

Step 7 Repeat the process ragging

it

and apply more

Overlap the wet edge of the off.

of rolling on glaze and

off until you reach the corner.


Ragging On

recipe Ragging on

one of the

is

2 1

parts latex paint PART WATER

simplest effects there is.

It

off,

but the advantage

is

can be applied without a glazing This

on

is

its

makes ing.

that

it

liquid,

a textured effect that looks great

own

overall appeal in

this celestial

creates a less subtle effect than

ragging

add to the

use a

lighter

the walls.

bedroom. Just

touch than you would for

When

ragging,

usually

it's

best to choose colors that are

fairly

close to each other, and the base color

rooms and

should be a few shades lighter than the

a perfect background for stencil-

ragged color. For example, rag yellow

in

children's

You can stencil

right

over the ragged

band as a border around

wall or paint a

the room and decorate the border.

Ragging on ceilings

is

easy and does

over a white base, or dark blue over a light blue.

sheen

It's

for the

best to use the

same

base coat and the paint

you rag on.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: brush,

roller,

tray

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

cotton or T-shirt fabric mixing container rags

sheen and paint

latex paint, any

is

best

paint tray

paper towels

same sheen as base

GETTING STARTED

61


o

INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base and

I <0

let

the Preparation section (page 42).

it

Step 3 Crumple up Step 4 Dip the rag

the rag so

it

looks

into the paint

like

a rose.

and dab off the

excess on paper towel.

Step 5 Apply the

rag to the wall

second

80%

Ragging on

in

to this finish,

color.

2 colors,

for

example, yellow over blue.

random marks

of the surface, keeping the

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

and can soften the

overall look

if

you

aren't satisfied with the appearance of the single color.

in

pattern as uniform as possible.

62

the effect looks uneven, apply a second a different shade of the same color or

Ragging on a second color adds even more texture

into a paint tray.

covering about

in

ALTERNATIVE

Dilute the paint according to the recipe

and pour

in a

If

coat: Apply 2 coats of latex paint

dry for 2 to 3 hours.

Step 2

TIP: coat


Sponging On

recipe 2

Sponging on

PAINT KAINI

the applica-

is

1

tion of latex paint with

sponge fairly

PARTS LATEX

a

directly onto the surface.

It

is

inexpensive because you are only

80 percent

covering about

of the sur-

face with diluted latex paint.

technique,

fast

quickly and the

as

the

It's

also a

paint

dries

second coat can usually

be applied as soon as you have finished the

first,

It's

if

you start

in

the

same

place.

important that the colors you

choose contrast

well,

and

I've

start

better

to

lighter

color

with

the

PART WATER

found

it

is

The easiest method colors

to

as the base,

make

complement each other

two colors from the same a or

medium

sure your is

family,

to pick

such as

blue sponged over pale blue,

two colors that have the same depth

or tone, like pastel yellow over a pastel

blue base. Using the

base coat as provide a different

in

same sheen

in

the

the sponged colors

will

more subtle sheens

will

effect.

Using two

add depth.

PAINT AND TOOLS 1 container for each CO or to be

BASE COAT: latex paint, flat, satin, or roller

,

semigloss

brusl l, an d paint tray

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint,

same sheen as base

sponged sea sponges disposable plates or pa paper towels

nt trays

GETTING STARTED

63


I

I

V


Š E m%

"Sb

fist

INSTRUCTIONS

c o

*VÂť"'*dfc

B^.

: .

'.

For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

Step 1 Base latex paint

and

coat: Apply 2 coats of

dry for 2 to

let

Don't forget, this coat

V

J

will

4

hours.

be one of

and the surface

is

dry,

first

color

use a clean sponge and

repeat the process with the second color, and then third color

as your pattern requires.

the colors seen on the surface.

Step 2 Mix

paint and water

containers as indicated

in

in

the

the recipes.

Pour each color onto a separate plate or tray.

are

Step 5 When you have completed the

damp, not

Step 3 sponge

Wet the sea sponges so they

dripping.

Start with

first color.

into the diluted paint

Remember that the base coat will always be the least seen color, and the last sponged color will be the most dominant. When you are working in the corners or along trim, break off a small piece of the sponge to avoid splotches or sponge marks.

TIPS:

Dip one side of the

and

blot the

excess

on paper towels.

Step 4 Dab ing about

the sponge

70%

in

an.

even pattern cover-

of the surface.

ALTERNATIVE The same three colors can give very different effects,

depending on the order

in

which they are

applied.

GETTING STARTED

65


Sponging Off e c

r

i

p e

PARTS LATEX

2

PAINT

Sponging off

is

2

a technique

whereby a colored glaze

is

PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING

a softer, more subtle effect

LIQUID

than sponging on. As the

PART WATER

1

applied over a base color;

the textured look

drying time

created by sponging

is

over the wet surface. Sponging off gives

slowed down to sponge

needs

off,

to

a glaze

be

must

be added to the paint.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

water-based glazing liquid mixing container sea sponge water 3" brush disposable plate or paint tray paper towels

latex paint, satin or semigloss roller, brush, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, same sheen as base

coat

INSTRUCTIONS

Step 5 Repeat step

For the best results, prepare your surface

lowing the guidelines

in

fol-

the Preparation section

(page 42). coat: Apply 2

coats of latex paint and

let

dry

2 to 4 hours. Step 2 Mix the colored glaze

for

recipe

in

a container.

Step 3 Working on an area of about 3' x 3', apply the colored glaze over

100%

surface. Always work

of the

in

small

sections to keep a wet edge.

Step 4 Dampen the sponge

with water.

one side of the sponge over the glaze.

66

with the sponge. full

Step 1 Base

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

Dab

3,

overlapping the previ-

ously sponged area slightly, and dabbing off

When

the sponge

of paint, rinse out with water.

becomes


Dragging Dragging ated

when

recipe

the effect cre-

is

a dry brush

PARTS LATEX PAINT PARTS WATER-BASED

2 is

2

pulled through a colored 1

glaze, revealing the

color

fine

in

monly

When

effect ful

or is

a

It's

is

most

effective

in soft,

is

fairly

doors,

the features and blends well with tex-

This

tured walls. Stencils work well over a

living

pas-

ideal for vin-

tage colors. You do need a

on

silk

colors over a white base coat. An off

white or cream base

used

most com-

moldings, and trim. This

a beauti-

painted finish for a bedroom or

is

are

walls

wallpaper.

also called strie.

room, and tel

silk-look

the job faster

Dragging

base

lines.

make

and easier.

GLAZING LIQUID PART WATER

dragged, they give the impression of fabric

will

steady

dragged

wall,

will

and by painting a border

around the top of the room color

highlight

in

the base

and stenciling over the top of

border, a clean

Dragging furniture,

is

edge

is

this

produced,

also an ideal finish for

and works well with other

fin-

height of the wall

ishes; for example, ragged walls look

from ceiling to baseboard, but using a

great with dragged baseboards. Use a

very wide brush, such as a wallpaper

semigloss paint, as you need a slippery

brush or even the end of a wide broom,

surface for this technique.

hand

to drag the

full

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: latex paint,

mixing container

semigloss

paintbrush

PAINTED FINISH:

3" brush 4" dragging brush or any long-bristled

paintbrush

latex paint, satin

rag

latex glazing liquid

varnish (optional)

GETTING STARTED

67


INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base and

let

the Preparation section (page 42).

I

coat: Apply 2 coats of latex paint

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2 Mix the colored glaze as indicated. Step 3 Apply the colored glaze to a workable length of the surface. (For small areas like table-

tops, cover the whole area.)

Step 4

Starting at one end,

pull

the dragging

brush straight through the wet glaze. Repeat several

times

until

you get the effect required.

ALTERNATIVES White base, yellow dragged (fresh look)

White base, vintage blue dragged (country or heritage look)

Step 5 Clean the dragging brush on the rag. Step 6 Repeat on the next section of surface. Step 7 Apply a coat of varnish for protection if the finish is on woodwork or trim.

TIPS:

you are working on a door frame, angle where the side and the top frames meet. Drag the adjoining area when the first dragged piece is dry. Always drag in the direction of the grain.

mask

If

off the

Opposite, a cornflower blue glaze has been dragged over a white basecoat with a wide brush.


V

<L


9

PART TWO

and Floors

s

Although they've been around for hundreds

of years, painted finishes

applied to walls and floors are one of the fastest-growing trends in

decorating today; their revival in the last fifteen years, first in

Europe and now asked

if

in

North America,

this trend will

wane, but

interest in decorative painting will

remain strong. The cost

of

decorating surfaces with paper,

is

quite remarkable. I'm often

in fact

and stone

is

high, and

although we may admire the rich look of silk or leather and the

believe today's newfound

Painted finishes are also ideal for camouflaging flawed surfaces or for adding

new

life

floors.

fabrics,

I

and character to old walls and

For

cotta-tinted glazes to a wall that or cracked, you

tically these materials are not

within

many

bit of paint

budgets. But with a

and a few inexpensive

and appeal to

are available to everyone.

marred

can produce a textured

will

add instant warmth

plain white stucco.

Applying painted finishes to large sur-

faces using water-based glazes

and gives better results together. Usually

tools, all of these elegant looks

is

look reminiscent of ancient frescoes; a

simple colorwash

refined polish of marble, realis-

by applying terra-

instance,

colored

glaze

if

is

faster

two people work

one person applies the

while

the

other follows,

removing or manipulating the glaze. To get

71


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

clean, professional corners on walls, work

one

at a time,

and mask along the corner

of the adjoining wall with low-tack tape.

This

way you can work

right into

the corner

without getting paint on the other wall.

top of a wall and work your way down. Brush or

roll

the glaze onto an area of about 3 feet

by 3 feet, then work the glaze to achieve

the desired effect (ragging, flogging,

Immediately apply the

next

etc.).

section

overlapping about. an

glaze,

along

inch

edge

the

is

as the wet edge;

this

dries,

if

seam forms

a

just

known

worked. This edge

edge the

in

paint, creating a line. This

correct

difficult to

do appear,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

can

and

spoil a painted effect,

lines

of

if

is

seam

best to

it's

redo that wall.

A paint

that

finish

truly professional

looks

never shows

the tools used to create

When

your

com-

are

walls

it.

pleted, the impression should

be of added texture or pattern, not of brush strokes or

sponge blotches. The

floor is

an important

room that

part of a

often

is

overlooked when decorating

we tend

either to put

carpeting

wall-to-wall

down or

to

and varnish the wood

stain

in

a plain honey or oak stain. But floors

your

are important,

home has few

moldings

make

The walls

of this study have been softly colorwashed in two colors with yellow ochre over a cream base coat.

Leave the glazed wall to the tape (low-tack'tape

dry,

is

then transfer

reusable) to the

dry glazed wall and continue.

Always start by applying the glaze to the

72

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

described

Many in

this

if

interesting

trim,

why

not

the floor a focal point? of the

paint

finishes

book can also be applied

to floors.. Character

wooden

or

and

can be added to new

floors by colorwashing

and then

adding a decorative stencil; damaged old


An

old linoleum floor has

been transformed

floors or unattractive imitation parquet

be easily disguised, and the look of simulated

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

all

to look like

can

tiles

with paint. Try painting a

a Mediterranean stone

about when

I

was

floor.

correcting a mistake.

If

you're not happy with your results, for

example, you've ragged a

rich terra-cotta

rug directly onto the floor (see Combing,

over a cream base, and the contrast

page 107);

a great idea for children's

great, try ragging over the terra-cotta with

needs a

the base color. Everyone's touch varies,

rooms lift.

it's

or for a long hallway that

Read the instructions (page 45)

for

preparing the floor before beginning.

Painted finishes

are

becoming more

and more interesting and sophisticated as

new techniques

Some of finishes came

are discovered.

my most stunning

paint

is

too

which makes each paint finish fresh and unique.

It

won't take you long to perfect

these simple effects, and you inventing your

Creating

will

soon be

own remarkable designs.

new looks

is

the best part of dec-

orative painting.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

73


C

H

A

P

T

F

R

TEXTURED FINISHES The interesting painted

effects found in this chapter are all

quick and easy to do, yet each one gives a distinctive look to

any wall or

floor.

Frottage, bagging, and flogging add tex-

ture to a plain surface by the application and

then partial removal of a tinted glaze. Each technique uses a different material â&#x20AC;&#x201D; paper, plastic bags, or a long-bristled brushâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; to produce unique

when pressed

designs and textures

into the glaze.

With fresco and painted stucco, a tinted glaze

is

applied randomly to the surface and then lightly

rubbed

off to imitate the

appearance

of

worn, weath-

ered walls. By colorwashing wood you have the

advantage

of

adding color without hiding the natural

wood grain. Plain wainscotting can be enlivened with a few coats of colorwash in interesting colors, and color-

washed

floors

make a

perfect background for stenciling.

Yellow has been painted over a rough stucco wall to create a softly textured finish.

74


i

I

Utftfc


Frottage

recipe 2

2

1

ter,

meaning

is

the

glazed

is

a beautiful

remarkably easy to

surface

rubbed, then removed

in

rich

and gently

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the technique

is

ance that looks for

like soft

an entrance

hall,

suede

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; perfect

dining room, or

even bedroom. On the walls of this

room

accented with touches of faux

more sophisticated.

tortoiseshell (page 154).

is

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, semigloss or satin, about 3 shades darker than the base coat water-based glazing liquid latex paint,

76

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

mixing container 3" brush paint tray and roller a

roll

or sheets of craft paper cut

approximately 3' x 5'-inch sheets semigloss varnish (optional) into

print

at right, ochre frottaged over pale

yellow

looks best ap-

A

frottaged finish has an elegant appear-

similar to bagging, but the results are It

dark colors

over a lighter base coat.

do. Sheets of craft paper are pressed

onto

plied

PART WATER

frot-

"to rub." This

painted finish that

LATEX PAINT PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING LIQUID

The name frottage stems from the French verb

PARTS SEMIGLOSS OR SATIN


r~-


ÂŁ)

INSTRUCTIONS

fofl

For the best results, prepare your surface following

mm

the guidelines

in

^1 ^J }J

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply

_

and

let

the preparation section (page 42).

2 coats of the base color

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2 Mix the recipe and pour

colored glaze as indicated it

in

the

into the paint tray.

Step 6

Roll

more colored glaze onto the next secthe glaze onto the edges of the

tion, overlapping

previously glazed area. Don't stop working until you

have finished a whole

wall,

keeping a wet edge the

page 72). Step 7 To add to the depth of

this paint effect,

apply a coat of semigloss varnish

when the

entire time (see

paint

is

dry (optional).

TIP: Each sheet of craft paper can be used several times. Work with a friend, one person applying the glaze, the other working with the paper.

ALTERNATIVES Frottaged painted finishes

Step 3 Work

in

sections slightly smaller than the

sheets of paper. Apply the colored glaze to the

edges of the section with a brush and then using a

roller.

fill

in

The glaze should cover 100% of the

work section.

Step 4 Immediately

lay a

the wet glaze. Smooth

Step 5 Remove

78

it

sheet of

craft

paper over

out with your hands.

the paper.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

in

green and red.


Bagging recipe PARTS LATEX PAINT PARTS WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID 1 PART WATER 2 2

Bagging

is

a

technique

that can

produce many

different

effects,

Here, the red glaze

depending on the

color combinations of the

and the glaze color used. process of

rolling

smoothing out the

lines cific

a simple

laying on

large

plastic.

By

plastic that's stuck

you create interesting

and creases. By choosing specolors

and smoothing out the

plastic in particular ways, you

ate

bagged over a white base coat,

base color

It's

bags or sheets of

to the glaze,

was

on glaze over a dry

base coat and then plastic

leather and even marble.

can

bagged finishes that look

PAINT BASE COAT:

like

Af *

\J

\J v/

L.

O

mixing container 3" brush

latex paint, satin

brush, roller, and paint PAINTED FINISH:

tray

latex paint, satin

water-based glazing

cre-

paint tray and roller

several garbage bags, sheets of plastic, or dry cleaning

bags

liquid

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

79


INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

I

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply

and

let

dry for 2 to

Step 2 Mix the Step 3 Cut the

4

2 coats of the base color

hours.

colored glaze as indicated. plastic

bags down the sides to get

very large sheets of plastic.

Step 4 Cut

the cor-

in

ners of the area to be painted with a brush, then

apply the a

with

colored

roller.

area about the

as the sheet of

Step

5

glaze

Cover an

same

size

plastic.

Immediately

place the plastic over the

Finish

one

wall before stopping or you will create

dark lines along the wet edge.

— —

TIP: Bagging is a very fast technique a whole room can be completed in a morning but it is much easier to work with a friend, one person applying the glaze, the other bagging.

wet glaze and smooth the

bag

out. This

forms the

creases.

Step 6 Remove the bag. Step 7 Repeat over the rest

of the surface over-

lapping the glaze slightly to maintain consistency.

ALTERNATIVES deep colors such as dark red, tan, or brown over a base coat that's a couple of shades lighter. Smooth the plasTo create the look of leather, use

tic

out so the creases run

Press

in

some

in

ors found black,

drifts,

£*

^^B

^L

80

this border.

in

real marble,

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

^H

col-

such as ochre, white,

and green. Smooth out the plastic in one so the creases and lines run in

direction only,

ik

1

in

To reproduce simple faux marble, start with

m^ i

different directions.

upholstery tacks for an updated

look that mimics leather, as

Ill

rich

emulating the veins of

real marble.


Flogging r

e c

i

p e

PARTS LATEX PAINT PARTS WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID 1 PART WATER 2

3

The term flogging derives

sides of the bristles. The

base color should

from the tool used to ereate this effect, a long-hair bristle brush

be a few shades

known as a

color, or

"flogger" that

is

similar to a

dragging brush. A real flogger sive, but

is

expen-

as a substitute you can use

any 3" painter's brush with long ties. Flogging is a

used

in

bris-

technique that can be

several different ways, from pro-

wood

lighter

ideally

than the glaze

you can apply the colored glaze

over white or cream for a more distinct pattern.

Flogging

on

large

surfaces

with

water-based paint and glaze takes practice,

and you need to work

fast.

Always

to

complete one wall before stopping, and

creating a silky textured effect on walls,

always keep a wet edge or dark join lines

A flogged

will

viding a background for faux

finish is

produced by applying

appear between the areas painted,

a colored glaze to the wall and then flog-

Shown on the

ging, or striking, the surface with the

flogged over a white base coat.

following page: soft green

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

4" brush

latex paint, satin or

brush,

roller,

semigloss

and paint tray

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, satin

water-based glazing

mixing container flogging brush or any long-bristled brush rag

liquid

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

81


INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of the

and

let

dry for 2 to

Step 2 Mix

base color

4 hours.

the colored glaze as indicated. Work-

ing an area of about 3'

x

3' at a time, apply the

colored glaze to the base coat

in

a crisscross

brushstroke.

Step 3

Pull

the brush vertically through the glaze

to create a dragged effect.

Step 4 Hold lel

the flogger so the bristles are paral-

to the surface

the glaze and

lift

and then slap the brush against up.

Keep repeating

wet glaze, keeping the brush

this over the

straight. This

breaks

up the dragged strokes.

Step 5 Repeat

by applying more glaze to the next

section, overlapping the sections slightly. Let dry.

TIP: Keep the flogger as dry as possible by continually wiping any glaze off on a rag.

I

ALTERNATIVES Pink glaze flogged over a white background.

Create an interesting pattern by flogging different directions, horizontal

The walls

in this city

and

in

two

vertical.

apartment were flogged

in a soft green.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

83

Io


Fresco e c

r

Fresco

is

the ancient art

of painting on

i

p e s

2

wet plaster

2

using pigments and wa-

make

also

For colored glazes:

PARTS LATEX PAINT PARTS WATER BASED GLAZING

grounds

perfect back-

for stenciled or

-

block-painted designs.

LIQUID ter,

which

technique

a

produces soft subtle

col-

1

Although

cient art,

it's

an

new and

now one

older

glazes randomly to the

PART WATER

an-

ular finishes for walls

both

finish first apply colored

PAINT

ors that possess great

depth.

To create a frescoed

PART WATER For whitewash 2 PARTS WHITE LATEX 1

most pop-

of the

and ceilings of

homes. With the

fol-

them together

blending

surface,

wall

slightly with a soft brush,

After the glazes have dried, brush on a thin coat of diluted white paint.

When

lowing recipe, this aged look can be

some

achieved with the simple application of

revealing the colors underneath, the gen-

flat

latex

paint.

If

you choose

warm

tie

of this

whitewash

face

an authentic frescoed wall

used two tones of pale

seen

in

those

old Italian villas. Frescoed walls

rubbed away,

look of a time- and weather-worn sur-

Mediterranean colors, you can create like

is

is

created.

In

this living

room,

gray, instead of

the more traditional terra-cotta colors.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: creamy white

water-based glazing latex paint, satin

roller, and paint PAINTED FINISH:

brush,

tray

pale orange/terra-cotta latex paint, satin

pale pink/terra-cotta latex paint, satin

84

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

I've

creamy white

liquid

latex paint, satin

3 mixing containers several 3" brushes paint tray soft rags

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; pieces

of T-shirt fabric

are best, each approximately

12-inches-square


O ^

INSTRUCTIONS

(/)

the guidelines

in

Q}

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of

^^"

For the best results, prepare your surface following

latex paint

and

the Preparation section (page 42).

let

dry for 2 to

Step 2 Mix the glazes as coat

4

creamy white

hours.

indicated: First glaze

orange/terra-cotta; second glaze coat

is

is

pink/terra-cotta.

Step 5

Fold the rag smoothly so there are no

creases, and dab onto wet surface to blend the colors and

Step 6

remove any

Pull

visible brushstrokes.

a dry brush horizontally and vertically

through the glaze to create random patterns. The look should be soft, with no brush marks. Let the

walls dry completely.

With the 3" brush apply the

Step 3

glaze (orange/terra-cotta) to about face, with a brush using

about

30%

70%

colored

of the sur-

random strokes.

Step 4 Apply second colored cotta) to

first

glaze (pink/terra-

of the surface.

Step 7 Whitewash

coat:

Dilute

creamy white

paint with water as indicated. Brush whitewash

randomly over the surface.

Step 8 With

rag folded smooth, dab out brushRub away some of the white paint to more of the color underneath. Let dry.

strokes. reveal

TIP: As the white paint dries, more of the base color will appear. For a a

86

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

second coat

more subtle

effect, try

of the white colorwash.


Painting Stucco recipe I

am

get

how

often asked of

rid

those

to

thick-pile roller

PARTS LATEX

2

PAINT

pointy 1

texture the surface with a

PART WATER wide spatula.

stucco ceilings that look like icing

sugar and how to camouflage

unsightly stucco on walls. Stucco

moval

is

expensive;

I

find

and then

re-

sanding down

are

in

If

your walls

bad condition, new stucco

will

hide the imperfections and provide a great surface on which to work.

the points and plastering over the top

smoother stucco

with a

to be a good,

inexpensive solution.

Stucco on walls

is

now once again

in

vogue, but the new stucco has either a

more polished, sophisticated look seen

restaurants) or

in

is

highlight its texture; a soft

diluted paint

works

well.

(often

painted to

colorwash of

There are many

A brands of stucco on the market, each with

different

instructions.

Ask your

hardware dealer about the proper cation.

I

like to

appli-

apply the stucco with a

stenciled border combines beautifully with stuccoed wans.

Because stucco

is

must be sealed before

plaster-based,

it

painting: Apply a

coat of shellac with a short-pile

roller.

PAINT AND TOOLS PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, low

4" brushes

sheen

rag

mixing container

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

87


INSTRUCTIONS

o o o

Step 1 Seal the

plaster stucco with a coat of shel-

lac using a short-piled

roller.

Previously painted

plaster should be given two coats of white latex paint.

Step 2 Dilute the paint with water as indicated. Step 3 Working in an area of about 4' x 4' at time, apply the diluted paint randomly over

the stucco with a 4" brush.

goes

a rag, blend

over the stucco so that

the crevices and

some

is

of the paint

is

more

fitting to

wall.

bronze for a contemporary look.

Fuchsia pink for a glamorous setting.

\

/

/

88

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

is left in

brushed away. This

ALTERNATIVES Dull

of

and spread the paint

some

add an aged look, which

coed

70%

the paint

into the crevices.

Step 4 With

Q.

Make sure

a

will

a stuc-


Colorwashing on Wood e c

r

PART LATEX

1

PAINT, FLAT

Instead of applying coats

opaque

latex

clean

of

paint.

If

stain

paint,

the

been stripped with chemicals,

nique of washing diluted

be

patterns of the

wood

to

Staining floors with paint nique,

common

onto

paint

wood allows the

natural

show through. is

an old tech-

country cottages.

in

Colorwashing

is

similar

to

staining, but less expensive,

washed down

water, then

left

more

subtle,

first

with blue paint, then with a

coat of green.

pro-

ors available, as

compared

*****S*mm~ 'mtaiis*!*******

finish.

There's also a huge range of paint

col-

to a rather

limited choice of colors for stains. Col-

orwashing

is

also effective on furniture

and wainscoting, and makes a perfect

base

for stencils.

Make sure the wood

is

thoroughly

PAINT AND TOOLS PAINTED FINISH:

lint-free rags

latex paint, flat

matte varnish

4" brush

90

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

and

second

wood

and

aged

vinegar

must

The walls below were colorwashed

y

a

with

it

to dry completely.

*»**miim>**»»&*** A

duces

old

wood has

which hide the grain of wood, this tech-

stripped bare

and

PART WATER

1

of

p e

i


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 4

For the best results, prepare your floor following the

want

the Preparing Floors section (page 45).

guidelines

in

Step 1

the

If

prevent resins

wood in

the

new, seal

Step 5

with shellac to

varnish.

wood and knotholes from seep-

washed

is

it

ing through your paint.

Apply a second coat of colorwash

to build

up the

color, or to

Protect your

A matte

new

finish

see less

finish with is

if

you

grain.

3 or 4 coats of

preferable for color-

floors.

TIPS: Colors will look less intense when they are watered down and rubbed into the wood. The depth of color will vary with the number of

1

o

I

c o

applications.

Any stenciling should be applied when the paint >

t,

!

is

completely

dry.

ALTERNATIVES

|

Three different colors: â&#x20AC;˘

pale pink 9-

.

historic blue

1

sea green

Step 2

o

o

Dilute the latex paint according to the recipe

and brush onto the wood floorboards of the grain.

Work on several boards

to cover the whole length of

in

the direction

at once, but try

each board. ..

^-

-

Step 3 Wipe the

floor lightly with a rag folded

so

there are no creases, exposing the grain of the

wood

while the colorwash

is still

wet. The idea

rub the paint into the wood, leaving a

so you can

still

of paint, discard

see the it

grain.

When

light

the rag

and use a new dry one.

is

to

coating is full


ÂŁ

APT

H

E

B.

PATTERNS Creating patterns and designs on surfaces with paint

is

a great alternative to

wallpaper or floor coverings. Paint

is

far cheaper, you can

more easily than you can with wallpaper, and you need just a roller and some primer to create an entirely new look when you want

match up colors

to

to furnishings

change the design or colors

of

your room. Patterns

can be applied to walls, floors, or even furniture in

many

different ways; for example, borders can be cre-

ated with stencils, stamps, or household tools such as

a comb, a kitchen sponge, or a bottle cork. Architectural

features

can be added, or

existing features highlighted by combining a

pattern such as a stripe, done below a chair

rail,

with a paint finish above. Any pattern applied to a floor,

from diamonds to tartan,

is

a simple, inex-

pensive way to add character and charm.

With a ruler and masking tape you can create crisp stripes and plaids; combs or sponges give a softer effect. This simple staircase bas been "countrified" witb a yellow and green diamond dado and a faux rag rug runner.

92 ^m


94

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


Stripes Stripes are a clever decorating tool and a quick solution to give the

room an extraordinary

make

izontal stripes

a

feel. Vertical stripes will

make

the walls look higher, while hor-

room look more spacious. Although the preparation, marking,

and taping take time, the actual painting of the stripes

member, the ple,

if

most ordinary

base color

color you use as the

will

accomplished

is

quickly. Re-

be one of the stripe colors. For exam-

you're painting yellow stripes over a white base coat, you'll end up with

yellow-and-white striped walls.

Although there are

many ways

to experiment with stripes, there are

rules that always apply. Walls should be

The wider the tips

stripe, the less taping

smooth

some

basic

or your stripes won't be straight.

and measuring there

is

to do.

Here are a few

on painting stripes.

Measuring and Marking the Stripes •

Stripes should be between 3 inches and

walls •

If

will

be too busy, any wider and the stripes

your room

mate width •

is

a standard shape,

size or

will

all

number

look heavy.

four walls and divide the approxi-

until

you get a width that

shape so choose a width

measuring opposite from the least-seen corner.

when you get back •

measure

of the desired stripe into this

Most rooms are not an exact

start

14 inches wide; any narrower and the

When

to that corner,

it

If

fits

evenly.

and

for your stripe

you have a smaller stripe

won't stand out.

you're working around windows and doors, just ignore

them

exactly as

if

you

were hanging wallpaper. •

After deciding on the width of the stripes,

pencil

and a

ruler or

perfectly straight.

measuring tape.

It's

mark around the top

of the

room with a

important to ensure your guidelines are

The professional (and easiest) way to do

this is with a

plumb

line.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

95


A plumb the wall, in

line is

tie

make

simple to

yourself. Take a length of light string the height of

a weight to one end, and tie a knot

the other end; place a thumbtack

in

the knotted end. Stick the thumbtack the

into

first

and the string

of the wall cally.

the

at

will

hang

top verti-

Pencil lightly along this line every foot

reach

you

until will

mark

pencil

baseboard.

the

always get a straight

Repeat

at

following the

line,

directions but omitting the

marks. press

this way.

each pencil mark. You can also

use a chalked plumb

same

line

Pull

it

You

the string so

it's

pencil

taut,

then

against the wall leaving a chalk residue on the surface. This can be easily

wiped away

later.

When

you've worked your way around the room, you're ready to tape.

Taping the Stripes Always use low-tack tape so you won't

when you remove the

tape.

Most low-tack tape

the room, paint, and then use the

same tape

is

pull off

the base coat

reusable, so you can tape half

again on the second half. Press the

tape down along the pencil marks on the outside perimeters of each stripe to be

When

painted.

you

will

you're finished taping,

have the

illusion of

two different

widths of stripes. The wider stripe

is

the

one to be painted. To be safe, mark a light

X

in

each

"thin" section, the stripe

not to be painted.

It's

easy to erase

these marks. Don't mark the strips to be painted: You can't erase a pencil mark

once the paint that yellow

96

we used

is

here,

covering it

will

it

is dry,

and

show through.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

if

you've used a

light

shade

like

the


Painting the Stripes The simplest method a

second

color.

Remove

is

to paint the stripes with a roller

the tape immediately, and with a

damp

in

folded paper towel

wipe away any paint that has seeped under the tape.

Alternatives

There

are

dozens

of

alternatives for striped finishes. Here

are two ideas:

Ragged Stripes

Follow the recipe for

ragging on or off a wall, but apply

the stripes only. Ragged stripes

will

it

to

cre-

ate a rich, elegant look. Here the base

coat

is

medium green and the

alternate stripes have been ragged

Shadow

striping:

in

a dark green.

Vary the width and

gloss of the stripes. Here the stripes are different widths, but the base color is flat

latex paint

gloss paint

in

and the stripe

the

same

color.

is

A high-

gloss varnish would achieve the

"shadow"

effect. Using different

produces a bold, dramatic

high-

same

sheens

finish.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

97


^ 1

7

^*"^

1

^

7

K^


Squeegee Stripes recipe PARTS LATEX

2

OR SEMIGLOSS 2 PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING PAINT, SATIN

Pulling a

LIQUID

window-washing

very easy from a chair

rail

down. Don't worry

the

PART WATER

1

squeegee that has been

if

cut with a pattern through a colored

lines are not perfectly straight; this is a

glaze creates fun and elegant stripes;

hand-painted finish, not wallpaper, and

this is

one

of

my

is

necessary.

straight lines

It's

should have character. Remember, as

with

all

the stripe finishes, the base

hard to get

coat

will

be one of the stripe colors. At

left

we've

or

when you're applying

technique from ceiling to

it

mea-

one of the easiest, as no taping suring

and

favorite finishes,

floor,

this

but

it's

added

painted to look

like

a

console

table

sheet metal.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

craft knife

latex paint, satin or

brush,

roller,

semigloss

and tray

(the

paper towel 3" brush

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, satin or

pencil and ruler

semigloss the base

same sheen as

coat); water-based glazing liquid

paint tray and roller a

second squeegee

for filling in

corners

12" squeegee

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

99


0)

</>

INSTRUCTIONS

Step 6 Cut

For the best results, prepare your surface following

will

the guidelines

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

Step 1 Base coat: Apply 2 coats and 4 hours. Step 2 With

let

dry for 2

just

Cut the

fit

a

second squeegee to the length that

the remaining space up to the corner.

same

pattern into the squeegee, then apply

glaze and pull the small section through. You

to

a pencil and

ruler,

mark a pattern of Keep

remaining corners.

teeth along the rubber edge of the squeegee.

the teeth

W

knife to

cut out a

apart.

Use a craft wedge at

every point.

Step 3 Mix the colored

.."-3PHS

glaze

as indicated and pour

into the

paint tray. First cut

with the

in

brush around the chair

rail

and

baseboard. Then apply an even coat to an area just over twice

as wide as the squeegee.

I

Step 4

Starting at one corner

and using a steady hand, place the squeegee at the top and

Wipe the excess glaze

pull

off the

through the glaze.

squeegee. Then

pull

the squeegee through the next section.

Step 5 Repeat, overlapping the next section. Continue full

squeegee length

100

may

need to cut additional squeegee sections for the

the glaze slightly on

until

there

is

less than a

to the corner.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


Stamping

is

a fast and fun

add patterns and designs furniture.

The

craft

way

to

to walls or

market

has

always had an enormous choice of rubber stamps, used primarily for personalizing notepaper, envelopes,

and

These

stamps

rather small

Now

school

children's

that

were

projects.

traditionally

and the designs

home

folksy.

decorators are

dis-

covering this simple but effective art

form, today larger rubber stamps with

Stamped patterns and freehand painting enliven a plain armoire.

plest

more sophisticated designs are

available,

such as roman numerals

and even animal

homemade stamp can be

prints.

The sim-

cut from a kitchen sponge, and, depending on the

combination of colors and shapes you choose, you can create a variety of styles from country to elegant to bold ethnic motifs. The designs used for this technique generally

have straight edges and basic shapes

common For

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; squares, diamonds, or stars are the most

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;that are easy to cut out of a kitchen sponge with a

more

intricate designs, a

called block painting. Although

it

new system has is

recently

utility

or craft knife.

appeared on the market

a stamping technique, the results are

to stenciling, so I've included this technique

in

more akin

the Stenciling and Block Painting

chapter (page 168).

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

101


Stamping Checks recipe PARTS LATEX

3

PAINT

PART WATER

1

With stamping, you'll be

how

Here, the rich greens are quite elegant, but for a child's

room you

border around the room, add accents to

could use several colors

beautiful

an old trunk or dresser, or create a

pastels,

checkerboard design.

would make a perfect backsplash

surprised

quickly you can apply a

never get

You'll

perfect squares with the checkerboard

technique featured here, but than

faster

taping

squares. The look

be

as

is

out

it's

all

rather fun, and can

sophisticated

as

you

want,

depending on the colors you choose,

red

and white checks

The base coat should be in

will

be seen, so

it

the

should complement

the stamped color.

kitchen sponge

pale green latex paint, matte, satin,

craft knife

semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: dark green latex paint, same sheen as base coat

mixing container disposable plates paper towels

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

In

checkerboard design, the base color

BASE COAT:

102

a

latex paint

any finish except high-gloss.

PAINT AND TOOLS or

in

country kitchen.

much those

and

in

pencil and ruler


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 4

For the best results, prepare your surface following

indicated and pour

it

onto a plate.

o

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of pale green

let

Dilute the dark green paint with water as

and

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

o

Step 2 Make your sponge stamp: Cut the sponge in a square; 3" x 3" is a good size for a wall border stamp.

E en

tn

Step 5 Press

the sponge into the paint. Then

press the sponge onto a paper towel to remove the excess. Making sure the sponge it

is straight, press onto the wall. Skip 3" and then press on again.

Work horizontally along each row, using the pencil marks along the top and down the side as a guide to

Step 3 Using the sponge square as

a guide,

keep the squares

straight.

mark

along the top of the wall and up the sides every 3" or the width of your stamp. This to

keep the stamps

is

a reference guide

straight.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

103


Rubber Stamping There are many rubber stamp designs available

but

if

in

craft

you would

and

like

available, you can

art supply stores,

a design that

not

is

photocopy the design

and take they

will

it

to a printing shop,

make

stamp

a

where

for you. Here,

colorwashed walls make a perfect background

for

stamping and gold

paint.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: latex paint, satin, or skip

PAINTED FINISH: rubber stamps ink pads or water-based paint small roller and tray pencil and ruler

you're

if

applying over a completed painted finish like a

colorwashed or

ragged wall

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1 Base

coat: Ap-

ply

flffiKf

'

n^^^^.

'^—

if

of

latex

using, and let

4 hours. Step 2 Draw a guidedry for 2 to

'

y* '

^k

d^Y

^W

coats

paint,

§P^ A „_

2

mark where the stamps go. Use a light, line to

erasable pencil.

wl1I 1

If

you

are stamping a border, pencil a straight line as

a guide and pencil

mark

for the

in

a

space be-

Step 4 Press

the stamp onto the wall surface.

tween each stamp.

and again rock the stamp backward and forward

Step 3 Cover the design on the stamp com-

to ensure you get a

Step 5 Remove

full

the

impression.

stamp

repeat. Reapply paint each time you

stamp with a small roller, rocking it back and press the stamp firmly into the ink pad and rock it.

get an even look.

forth, or

Step 6 Remove any paint

pencil

and stamp to

carefully

pletely with ink or paint: Apply the paint to the

marks when

all

the

is dry.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

105


"

'

-"

"-'

-

Combing recipe 2

A comb

is

produce

it

re-

can also be used to create

types of designs and

all

floors,

walls,

Just

patterns on

and especially

furniture.

a

cut

piece

inches square,

LIQUID

wood

different

grains, but

PAINT, SATIN OR SEMIGLOSS 2 PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING

often used by

decorative painters to

PARTS LATEX

A steady hand

is

Avoid tackling the

ing.

full

straight lines while going up

different sizes,

such as rubber triangles with different size teeth on

each side, or even metal

combs. The easier of these tools the rubber comb, but

is

very difficult to

Baseboards or

comb

and down a

furniture are really

the ideal surfaces to work on. The most

homemade combs

ing through a colored glaze over a white

My

from a piece of foam

in

ladder.

it

successful effects are produced by comb-

use

make and easy

core, available

as

height of a

is

to

are both simple to favorite is cut

one

required for comb-

combs

many

at

wide and about 1 inch long,

wall,

in

and

end cut out even teeth Va inch

There are several types of professional available

about 4

to use.

art supply or craft store,

or pale

base coat, but whatever color

pattern you do, a will

combed

or

paint finish

always be stunning and unique.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

low-tack painter's tape

white latex paint, semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: blue latex paint, satin or semigloss water-based glazing liquid

pencil

rubber comb or handmade comb small roller and paint tray or 3"

sponge brush rag

mixing container

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

107


w E

o

o

INSTRUCTIONS Basketweave Pattern/Dado For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

Step 1 Base

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

coat: Apply 2 coats of white semi-

gloss paint and

let

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2 Put a length of low-tack tape along the top and down the side of the dado. Then, with a pencil, mark the width of the comb along the tape. Step 3 Mix the glaze, and apply to a 4' x 4' section.

Place a piece of tape to mark off this area.

Step 4 until

Pull

the

comb through

the glaze horizontally

the whole glazed area has been

combed

direction.

in

one

Step 5 Go back to the starting position and pull comb vertically through the glaze to match the

the

width of the comb, creating a square. Skip a space of equal size and repeat until the

end of the row.

Create a checkerboard pattern when combing sub-

sequent rows.

Step 6 Apply glaze

to another 4' section.

Repeat the horizontal and then

vertical

Tape

off.

combing.

TIP: When you reach the corner, if the comb doesn't fit, cut out a small comb just for that space.

108

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


WV

«_~>V

/

^CVH

IIr

I I

n


Li

ALTERNATIVES I

found this dresser at a yard sale;

some new hardware and design has transformed

it

a bit of paint. it

into

just needed The combing

an elegant piece.

Vary your movements to produce a wavy pattern.

You can create a simple border using a home-

made comb and

110

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

a pencil eraser dipped

in

paint.


Terra-Cotta Tiles

Imitation tiles are a great paint treat-

out of a piece of upholstery foam. The

ment

most wonderful thing about

imperfect wood floors. With

for

this finish

staining or colorwashing, any repairs

is

that the tones for your tiles are mixed

often remain visible and are not very

in

such a way that you need stamp only

attractive. Painted terra-cotta tiles cost

once to get the

a fraction of the real thing,

and as a

will

not difficult

the feet as stone and clay.

knees

is

find in the section

101); there but

in

this

the

same as you

will

on Stamping (page

we use

a kitchen

case you cut a

"tile"

lines

be the color of your base coat.

bonus they are not as hard and cold on

The technique

The grout

effect.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;just

a

little

It's

hard on the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the results are amazing.

Prepare

the

floor

properly

before

beginning to paint, and finish off the job

sponge

with three or four coats of mid-sheen or

sponge

satin varnish for protection.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: medium gray

latex paint, satin

4"-thick upholstery

brush,

and paint tray

craft knife

roller,

paint tray and roller

PAINTED FINISH: terra-cotta and red/brown latex

paints, satin

cream

latex paint, satin

paint stirrer

foam

pencil and ruler

paper towels 2" brush large

aluminum

tray or plastic sheet

semigloss varnish

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

111


INSTRUCTIONS 0)

For the best results, prepare your floor surface

lowing the guidelines

in

fol-

the Preparing Floors sec-

tion (page 45).

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of gray (your

grout color) and

let

dry 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2 Cut the upholstery foam

o

o

12"

is

This

4

a

will

good

into a square;

one corner.

size for a floor. Slice off

create a diamond pattern

in

the center of

Then cut a diamond shape to fit in that cenThe diamond should be Va smaller on each of

tiles.

ter.

the sides than the diamond space

left

by the large

square. This allows for the grouting space.

.0)

Step 3 Mark will

guidelines on the floor where the tiles

go, leaving a

W gap between each

tile for

the

Step 6 Begin place on the

in

floor,

a corner. Press the

then

lift.

foam

into

Turn the foam 90° and

press again. Repeat until you have 4 tiles with a diamond shape left unpainted in the center. Reapply paint to the foam every other square. Each tile should look different than the others. Repeat the

"grout."

Step 4 Pour some

of the terra-cotta paint onto the

aluminum little

tray. Dribble

the

of

pattern over the whole floor surface.

a

red/brown

over the terra-cotta. Swirl a

paint

the

stirrer

paint,

but

through

do

overmix or the result

not will

be muddy.

Step 5 Place the foam tile

into the paint.

the bottom

is

Press

make sure completely covered. Dab off any down

firmly to

excess on a paper towel.

Step 7

If

the foam square does not

corners, cut a small piece of

foam

fit in

awkward

to size or

fill

in

this area with a brush.

Step 8

Let the terra-cotta tiles dry. Then use the

smaller diamond sponge to stamp with the

cream

in

the centers

paint.

Step 9 Apply 3

or

4 coats

of semigloss varnish.

TIP: Test out the pattern and color on newspaper first

112

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


Stone Blocking r

e c

i

p e

PARTS LATEX PAI NT PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING LIQUID L """ B 1 PART WATER 2 2

Stone blocking effect that

will

a bold

is

add instant

character to any room.

mend

stone

I

will

Some

people worry that the

I

think you'll find a stone-

blocked wall painted

in

ors, beiges, or grays will

fresh

in

ing

the evening.

in

usually recom-

be cold and impersonal. On

the contrary,

natural light

soft

it

looks

like

a complicated technique,

this finish for a hallway, entrance,

or kitchen.

Although

sand

col-

be subtle and

and warm and

invit-

it's

actually

very easy.

It

can be a

lengthy process because of the marking

and measuring of each "stone," but really It's

depends on the

this

size of the room,

important that the blocks of stone

are the right scale for the room. A good size

is

18 inches by 14 inches

large room, for a small

for a

and 16 inches by 12 inches

space

like a vestibule.

There

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: gray,

cream, or white latex paint,

satin

brush,

roller,

and paint tray

PAINTED FINISH: in stone colors: sand, brown, gray, and white, satin sheen water-based glazing liquid

latex paint

mixing containers disposable plates sea sponges pencil and long ruler or yardstick cardboard eraser wide paintbrush 3" or 6" paintbrush low-tack tape

W

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

115


M

are several techniques for creating faux stonework, but the following

method;

it's

easy and a

The base coat

o

will

terra-cotta. or white.

lot

be the color of the groating or mortar; you can use

tn

in

gray,

cream,

the walls are already coated with latex paint, just

If

they only enhance the effect.

coats of latex

favorite

of fun.

that they are clean and there's no flaking paint. There's no need to

o c o

my

is

If

fix

make sure

any cracks, as

you need to apply a new base coat, use one or two

a satin finish.

Measuring, Marking, and Taping Stones •

Decide on the size of the stones. Make a cardboard template of one block and tape it

to the wall to get a feeling of the scale

you'll •

be working

Starting

in

in.

the top corner, mark along

the wall with a pencil and

ruler.

To help you

get the lines straight, use a level or

T-

square. •

A

fast

way

small area

is

to

map

to cut a

and draw around

this

out the stones

in

a

cardboard template on the

wall. Start

in

the top corner and work along the top row,

keeping the board butted up under the ceiling or molding. For the second row, position the template halfway across the width of the

stone

above,

stones

in

Using

imitating

the

placement

of

a real stone wall.

Winch

low-tack painter's tape, tape

over the pencil marks. These

will

be your

grout lines. After you have completed paint-

and the paint

ing,

is

dry,

erase the pencil

marks. •

Add a coat of varnish

ing

in

116

for protection

a kitchen or bathroom.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

if

work-


M

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of latex paint,

Keep in mind show through as the for 2 to 4 hours.

either gray, white, or cream.

color you

choose

will

the grouting. Let dry

Step 2

that the color of

o

Mix your colored glazes as indicated.

Because we're using water-based

glaze, which dries

quickly,

work an area of

about

10

blocks

v

$s

of

0>

c o

stone at a time. Apply the

first

(sand)

colored glaze with

brush over

a

100%

jf

wide of the

area.

Step 3 Pour

the

differ-

ent stone-colored glazes

onto paper plates.

Make

sure the stone colors are

close

you can use 2 or 3 shades. Tear a

in

contrast;

damp sea sponge

have more gray tones, the next more sand tones.

into small pieces.

and so on.

Step 4 Sponge

Step 7 While the colored glazes

the second colored glaze (brown)

randomly over each section

Cover

of

80%

still

wet, go

damp sponge.

blending the colors together so they don't look too

stone.

of area.

Step 5 Apply

are

over the whole surface with a clean

spotty.

Step 8 Remove

third

the tape and

when the

paint

is

dry

erase the pencil marks.

colored glaze (gray) to small areas. This is

the natural mark-

ings

of the

use

sparingly.

stone;

Step 6 Repeat

ors you have chosen) sparingly. slightly

/

with white glaze (or any other col-

different.

Realistically,

Make each stone one stone would

TIP: At the beginning, you may find 10 blocks too many to work on, as you must complete each step while the colored glaze is wet. You might want to start off working in a smaller area, but don't worry you'll soon speed up.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

117


-

m 7

i


Diamonds

This It

is

one

of

my

favorite painted floors.

looks particularly wonderful

in

hall-

The actual painting

of the floor

and easy, but the taping and measuring

Make sure

ways, but opens up and brightens any

take time.

space. Although black and white dia-

pared properly, and when

monds

eral

are always stunning, other com-

binations work well also. For a

subdued for

effect, try pale gray

more

and white;

elegance, try dark green and

light

green; and for a sunny children's room, pale yellow and blue

make

a cheerful

fast

is

the floor

pre-

is

dry, apply sev-

coats of varnish so that your work

lasts.

It

is difficult

to achieve a

smooth

varnish finish on an area as large as a floor;

recommend

I

hiring a professional

so you're guaranteed a perfect

finish.

If

the diamonds don't divide up neatly, you

can always leave a border.

play surface.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

low-tack masking tape

white latex paint, satin or semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray

craft or utility knife

PAINTED FINISH:

paintbrush

roller

and paint tray

black latex paint, satin or semigloss

rag

pencil

varnish

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

sheen depends on your

measuring tape

taste, but high gloss looks great

chalk

on black-and-white diamond floors

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

119


e o

INSTRUCTIONS

(4)

For the best results, prepare your floor following the

guidelines

in

the Preparing Floors section (page 45).

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply

the primed floor and

let

Step 2 Measuring and

e E

dry for

4

latex to

Measure the width and the

and

find the center point.

(2)

Divide the width of the

all

mapped

the diamonds are

out,

tape

knife to cut tape corners cleanly.

mark the diamonds

to

It's

a good idea to

be painted with a

light

cross

so you won't make a mistake. The ones to be

hours.

painted

taping the diamonds:

(1)

length of the

will

appear

larger.

room

room by the proposed if the room

width of a single diamond. For example, is

o

2 coats of white

When

the inside of each alternate diamond. Use a craft

16' wide, the width of each diamond could be 2',

which would create 8 whole diamonds across the width of the feet, there

mond

at

floor.

If

the length of the room

would be 8

full

diamonds and

is

17

half a dia-

each end.

room and measure outdiamonds at the sides, partial want the ward. You if there will be any, to be the same size. Make pencil marks on the base coat. When everything is marked, join up the marks with a chalk line, which (3)

may

Find the center of the

require two people.

Paint the black diamonds: With a roller and brush, apply 2 coats of the black latex paint to the marked diamonds. The pencil marks will not show through the black paint. Remove the tape and

Step 3

wipe away any seepage with a floor to cure for

damp

rag. Allow

the

2 days.

or 4 coats of varnish for sheen and See Varnish on Painted Floors, page 39.

Step 4 Apply 3 protection.

Diamond Dado A diamond pattern looks fantastic on a wall, especially as a dado. Soft muted colors make a perfect finish for a country-style house, as on page 93. Rather than an opaque (solid) base coat, we light yellow colorwash above and

brushed on a

below the rail. The elongated diamond pattern was marked off with masking tape, and then, to create a more subtle effect, the colored diamonds

were ragged and rubbed with a bit of green paint. The broken color in the colorwashed background and ragged diamonds adds irresistible charm to this design.

120

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


3

=

f

llllpllllll

liiiiiupiiiiii

llllllllllplllllll

=

iiiiiiiiiiii

llllllllplllUIIII

=

ss

Tartan

Painting the look of tartan creates a

surfaces are the easiest to work on:

whimsical finish that looks great

avoid carved surfaces, or ones with a

bright colors. Here,

I

in

livened up an old

trunk with a base coat of bright yellow,

and added black lines.

This

stitch

finish

walls, furniture,

is

busy design. The following recipe

based on a simple design, but

more sophisticated

marks and blue

want

appropriate

can copy a piece of

and even

floors.

for Flat

a

The method

will

if

is

you

pattern, you

real tartan fabric.

be the same.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: bright yellow latex paint, semigloss

brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: black and blue latex paint

two V2" artist's brushes rag or paper towels pencil and ruler low-tack painter's tape varnish semigloss or high sheen

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

121


INSTRUCTIONS iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiii

<3

For best results, prepare your surface following the

guidelines

Step 1

.CO

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of yellow latex iiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiliiiliiilililliililiiilliiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii

and

dry for 2 to

let

4

hours.

Step 2 When the base coat pencil

where the pattern

is dry,

mark

off with a

lines will go. Don't worry. ll|[|[|[l|||IIIIIIHlili:illllllllllllllini!!llll!ll(lllll!lllllllilll[llllllllllllllllll!ILIIIIIIIIIIII!llllllll!illllllHM

The

pencil

marks

disappear under the opaque

will

made

paint. Here, I've

a grid of 4" squares.

Step 7 Apply TIP: A

makes paint

a coat of varnish for protection.

little bit of

glaze mixed into the paint

make a straight line, but the become translucent, producing a

easier to

it

will

slightly different effect.

=

=

=

Illlllllllllllllllllll

111111

Step 3 Run 2 pieces the squares

between

in

Step 4 With paint guide.

in It

one

parallel

down the center

direction, leaving a V2"

taped

stitch

Illllllllllilllllll

ilium!

of

space

strips.

a V2" paintbrush

each

may

of tape

llllllllllllllllll

1

and black

paint,

Illlllllliilllllllll

Hill

Illllllllpllllllll

[Illlllllllplllllllll

imiiiiyi

mark using the tape as your it goes very

look time-consuming, but

quickly. Hill

Illlllllliilllllllll

llllllllllllllllll

lllllllllilpllllll

mini 11 11

=

g

1

^

ALTERNATIVE Plaid Floor

When you

are painting any design on a floor,

important to follow the guidelines tion section (page 45).

worked

I

used

in

it's

the Prepara-

historic colors that

well with the milk paint

on these kitchen

cupboards. You can use milk paint on wooden floors, but the

there

is

wood must be

well

sanded so that

no residue of varnish or old paint (see

Milk Paint, page 143). The actual painting for the

Step 5 Remove in

tape. Repeat stitch

marks running

Step 6

Paint over the pencil

marks with an

artist's

brush and blue paint. These lines look best hand drawn, but

if

you want perfectly straight

retape for this step.

122

tartan floor

is

very easy, but there's lots of mea-

suring and taping. However, the results are well

the opposite direction.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

lines,

worth

it!

For the tartan on this floor latex paint:

I

used 4 colors of gray, and bur-

cream, vintage green,

gundy. Instructions: Apply 2 coats of cream for


eg

tr .CO

the base coat, and

dry overnight.

let

Map

out a

grid of 2'

squares and tape alternate squares with

low-tack

tape.

With

a

roller,

paint

alternate

squares green. Remove the tape and leave the green to dry for a few hours. At this stage the floor will

look like a green and

cream checkerboard.

Retape the cream squares on every alternate row,

and will

roll

izontally

down the center

of the green

and gray

squares, and V2" burgundy lines through the green

and cream squares,

vertically

and

horizontally. For

perfect lines, run 2 strips of tape with a V2" gap

between the

strips, roll

on the paint

line,

remove

the tape, and wipe away any leaks immediately with a

damp

cloth.

Leave each

line to

dry for a few

gray paint over these taped squares. You

hours before taping off the next one. Let the paint

cream

cure for two days, apply at least 3 or 4 coats of

now have

alternate rows of green and

squares and green and gray squares. Leave to cream lines vertically and hordry. Next, apply

W

low-sheen varnish for protection, and allow the

fin-

ished floor to cure for one week.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

123


C

H

A

T

P

R

F

STONE FINISHES From faus marble to granite

looks, stone effects are the

ing and most creative of all painted finishes. selves, but

practice.

They are an art unto them-

one that anyone can master with a

Once you've gotten your

feet

most interest-

little

wet with the

basic finishes like ragging and sponging, beautiful

.aa^esare^ene^tep. |

Stone finishes add character to any room,

whether

in

a rustic country cottage or an elegant town house,

and they can be applied

to

a variety

of

surfacesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; walls, base-

boards, molding, trim, and, of course, floors and furniture. If

you're not sure which colors to use or which stone you prefer,

I

visit

a

tile store; collect

pieces of marble and granite tile to see

how

the shapes and patterns are formed, and study stone walls to witness all

the interesting shades and tones of real stone.

it's

If

you're a beginner,

best to start with small projects such as tabletops or fireplaces,

and then progress

to

trim and

large areas, such as dadoes. Don't

worry

if

you make a mistake-

imperfections are often found in natural stones.

Clockwise from top

124

left:

Carrara Marble, Sienna Marble, Faus Granite, Easy Marble.


KEfR'


Easy Marble recipe PARTS LATEX ANY SHEEN 2 PARTS WATERBASED GLAZING 2

One

of

the

most

PAINT,

time-

honored painted finishes,

was

faux marble

Realistically,

be installed sections.

LIQUID

traditionally 1

lars,

desired

real

but unaffordable.

pil-

marble was Today,

the

is

completed project

can be seen on moldings, doors, pan-

slippery

els,

so popular that

and fixtures where actual marble

would

rarely

Easy marble

be used.

great effect for a beginner roll

then

is

a

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you simply

colored glaze onto the surface,

make

a pattern

in

the glaze with a

plastic bag, et voila.

It

easier to work a small area, and your

When

is

applying a

walls, divide the surface into panels.

it

look of faux marble

When

or

faux marble finish to your

mantelpieces, and

where the look of

panels

in

PART WATER

applied to surfaces such as floors, tabletops,

marble would

look

will

dry, a painted

more

surface

when the sheen

high. So,

authentic, is

more

of the paint

is

use a base coat with a sheen,

as the surface needs to be smooth and shiny

in

order to manipulate the colored

glaze easily. The fireplace site features

shown oppo-

brown easy marble panels;

the rest of the fireplace

is

faux granite.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: cream white brush,

roller,

semigloss and paint tray

latex,

PAINTED FINISH: red/brown latex

water-based glazing mixing container roller

plastic paint, satin or semi-

liquid

garbage bags

high-gloss varnish

gloss

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

127


0)

INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

Step 1 Base paint

and

let

Step 2 Mix

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

coat: Apply

dry for 2 to

4

2 coats of white latex hours.

the red/brown colored glaze.

If

applying the finish to a large space, work tions of 3'

x

3' or 4'

x

4' at a time.

you are in

sec-

Cover one sec-

tion completely with glaze.

LU

Step 6 When

dry

apply

high-gloss

varnish for

sheen and protection.

Step 3 Step 4 face,

Fold up the plastic

bag

Unfold the bag, place

and smooth

it

it

like

an accordian.

over the whole sur-

out.

ALTERNATIVES Here are two more examples of easy marble: green glaze over a white base and light sand glaze also

over a white base.

Step 5

Pull

ing lines

the bag carefully off the glaze, reveal-

and veins similar to those found

marble.

Move on

128

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

to the next section.

in

real


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Carrara Marble

recipes For white glaze:

PARTS WHITE LATEX PAINT PARTS WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID 1 PART WATER 2 2

For gray glaze: 2

Real

Carrara

1

marble

PARTS WHITE LATEX PAINT DROP BLACK ARTIST'S ACRYLIC PAINT

When

comes from the town of Carrara

used

in

Italy,

for floors, trim,

look of marble, bear

and

is

commonly

and mantelpieces.

The elegance of Carrara marble ily

reproduced with paint, and

is

will

eas-

trans-

form a plain wooden fireplace or a tabletop

into

a

reproducing the

stunning showpiece,

mind that

in

installed

up

in

will

work on, so fully,

marble

would

be

pieces, so break your work

into panels,

time. You

real

working one section at a

want a smooth surface

it's

to

important to sand care-

and use a semigloss basecoat.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

mixing container

white latex paint, semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: white and pale gray latex paint,

semigloss water-based glazing

liquid

sponge sticks T-shirt fabric is best feather or thin artist's brush badger softening brush or softbristled paintbrush high-gloss varnish

soft rag

black artist's acrylic paint

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

129


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 8 Holding

For the best results, prepare your surface following

veins running across the surface following the

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

the Preparation section (page 42).

like

a pen, gently paint

same

direction as the drifts.

coat: Apply 2 coats of white latex

paint and let dry for 2 to

Step 2

the feather

4 hours.

Mix the 2 glazes according to the given

recipes.

Step 3 When base coat is

CO

the dry,

2

use a sponge stick whole

to cover the

surface

the

with

o

white glaze.

Step 4 Apply the gray glaze

in drifts

across the surface with a

sponge

stick.

Step 5 Rag the surface with a crumpled rag (see Rag-

ging Off, page 59).

Step 9 Soften

parts of the veins with the soften-

ing brush as described in step 6.

Step 10 Apply 2 coats

\

V

of clear high-gloss varnish for

protection and to emulate the

sheen of

real marble.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;^^-

*

i Step 6 Hold the badger

softening brush at a right

angle to the surface with a loose wrist and gently

brush backward and forward, softening the glazes.

The white and gray will

become

cloudy.

â&#x20AC;˘

Vary the effect by leaving

*f

^6.

some areas

barely brushed.

Step 7 Mix

equal

parts black artist's acrylic

and

latex

glazing liquid on a plate.

Run the

tip

the black glaze.

(about 1") of the feather through

TIPS ON VEINING Veining does take a little practice. Keep in mind that veins should be barely visible in places and stronger in other places; small veins should break off from the main veins periodically. Do not overvein.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

131


Sienna Marble recipe 1

TABLESPOON ARTIST'S ACRYLIC

Sienna marble

is

RAW SIENNA

an ele-

4

GLAZING LIQUID

gant marble that looks 2

best on

small

Raw sienna and

trim,

pat-

in

terns on tabletops, lamp bases, and is

an intricate marble, so

you are not familiar with the way ally looks,

it

might be best to

real thing.

The technique

the look of Sienna marble

artist's acrylic

essential for achieving a realistic

is

result.

Review Ragging Off (page 59)

and Sponging Off (page 66) as you

a

this finish.

tile

more com-

plex than for the other marbles, com-

The base coat should be very smooth for a realistic

marble

finish. It's impor-

tant to give the surface a good sanding

before you begin.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: creamy white

latex paint,

semigloss

brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH:

raw sienna latex paint or artist's liquid

mixing container black wax crayon

132

badger softening brush or a bristled paintbrush rag

sea sponge 3" brush feather

acrylic paint

water-based glazing

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

will

be using these techniques to create

for creating is

shapes.

actu-

it

visit

if

and take a look at the

or marble store

irregular pebble

TABLESPOONS WATER

areas

such as moldings and

boxes. This

bining black veins with

CUPS WATER-BASED

water turpentine high-gloss varnish

soft-


INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of off-white latex

paint

and

let

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

05

C c

<75 Step 4 Hold

the badger softening brush at a right

angle to the surface and gently brush backward and

forward to create a cloudy effect.

Step 2

Mix the glaze as indicated. Apply with a

brush over

100%

of the surface,

on a small surface.

If

if

you are working

working on a large surface,

like

the wall below a chair

into

panels and work on one panel at a time.

rail,

divide the wall up If

you

are working on trim or molding, do lengths of about 4' at a time.

Step 5

Dip the feather

through the glaze

open up the

as

Step 3 With

a bunched-up rag,

it

one

in

water, then pull the tip

direction.

The water

will

glaze, creating several veins.

Step 6 With of the glaze.

in

a moist sea sponge,

Once

dab over areas

again, the glaze should

open up

reacts to the water.

dab over the wet

glaze to break up brushstrokes.

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

133


Step 8

wax crayon into some turDraw a few veins following the pattern already created by the water. Draw around Dip the end of a

pentine to soften

it.

each pebble.

Step 9

With the rag, blot and soften the black

veins so they blend into the marble.

s s Step 7 With

<7>

ger,

a rag wrapped around the end of a

fin-

wipe a few irregular pebble shapes along the

veins.

Step 10

When

the whole surface

is dry,

apply 2

coats of high-gloss varnish for protection and sheen.

>

ÂŁt*fe

134

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


Faux Granite

Granite

is

and

a hard, multi-

apply

a

high-gloss

flecked stone widely used

varnish not only to pro-

and exte-

tect your work, but to give

on both rior

interior

surfaces.

Its

durability

and

hand-

rich

some appearance have made

granite a

popular building material, but

it

is

very

heavy and very expensive. Simulating the look of granite

is

easy with the sim-

pie technique of sponging.

The effect

is

the

it

quality

sheen

and

we associate

three-dimensional with this stone,

Depending on the colors you choose, and the order on,

many

in

which you sponge them

different granite looks can be

produced. Have fun creating your own

we have on

created by applying layers of colors with

design as

a fine-holed sponge, or by using two

which features black, yellow, and white

sponges with

fantasy

different-sized holes. To

look authentic, the surface

very smooth, so sand

it

first

must be

thoroughly,

faux

granite.

this tabletop.

I

used

sponge with large holes, but real granite,

to

a

sea

emulate

use one with smaller holes.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

mixing containers

semigloss brush, roller, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH: latex paint, semigloss, in 3 colors water-based glazing liquid

sea sponges

latex paint,

plates or paint trays

paper towels high-gloss varnish

FINISHES FOR WALLS AND FLOORS

135


0) MB

c 2 x 3 i2

INSTRUCTIONS AND TIPS •

The same technique

is

used

for creating faux

granite as for sponging on, but slightly refined.

The

When

the surface

is

complete and

dry, apply

2

coats of high-gloss varnish for protection and to give your work the shiny finish of real granite.

flecks should be smaller and tighter, and this can

be achieved either by more layers of paint or by

ALTERNATIVES

using a sea sponge with small holes.

Here are recipes

make

Colored glazes

Let each layer dry before applying the next.

the finish translucent.

Base coat First

glaze coat

(80% coverage)

Second glaze coat (20% coverage) Third glaze coat (30% coverage)

Base coat First

glaze coat

(80% coverage)

Second glaze coat (20% coverage) Third glaze coat

(30% coverage)

for

4

different but similar granites.

Each features a different base color and three ors

sponged on

top.

BROWN

CREAM

Base coat

BROWN

First

BLACK GRAY

Third glaze coat

glaze coat

(80% coverage)

Second glaze coat (20% coverage)

(30% coverage)

GOLD/GREEN RUST BLACK

Second glaze coat (20% coverage)

WHITE

Third glaze coat

glaze coat (80% coverage)

(30% coverage)

.<•'-;

V

*z

GRAY BLACK WHITE

BLACK

Base coat First

col-

' -

PALE GRAY

DARK GRAY BLACK

-'/-•-.

%^ m-* :

m 136

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


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• PART THREE

for Furniture,

Trim, and

Accessories We

all

have pieces

of furniture that no longer look right in

or pieces we've inherited

or, in

my case,

furniture that

husband! Often these furnishings are solid and well of today's

came with a

remarkable how a piece can be transformed at

and

easily, into

a treasured heir-

loom. People often find tackling

walls with painted finishes rather

daunting, but feel more confident

A fast-growing and iting

many

I've

is

favorite

it's

found over the years.

decorative

painters

quickly

pastime

lot

pleasing,

little cost,

garage and yard sales

what

neve

made— unlike a

pieces— but they look dated. As long as the shape

it's

our homes,

is vis-

amazing In

fact,

have started

successful businesses by finding second-

painting small surfaces. The projects then

become

fun,

and are a

great way to try out new ideas.

hand

pieces,

transforming

painted effects and

them

with

some new hardware,

and then reselling them.

139


ÂŁ

H

A

P

T

R

F

&

ANTIQUE AND SPECIALTY FINISHES Aging new and reproduction pieces well-loved hand-me-downs

is

to

have the warmth

of

easy and accessible with the

glorious range of colors you'll find in the historic color palette. All you need is a bit of sanding to

"wear

off" the

fresh paint in the places where these

pieces

would have been naturally

worn over time. And there are now clever, time-saving techniques for producing crackled or

weathered paint finishes, perfect for fixing up your own family heirlooms.

For small projects that

will

have a big impact on

your room, nothing can surpass the glamour of a gilded finish or the exotic touch of faux tortoiseshell. With the addition takes on the look

140

of

a red crackle finish and some gold detail, a new mosaic-topped table

of

an Eastern antique.


^

C<-->

-

•V'^_ tors.

.

P?

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ytv

s* ^ _ y

'

--*

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^M ^HM ^m^m

^V VM

b»iiif.l

I ^m ^H


ilk

Milk paint has been used for centuries to color

and decorate household

ture and joinery; the recipe

furni-

was brought

from Europe to North America by the set-

The

tlers.

basic

ingredients,

which

Paint

more convenient commercially produced and water-based paints took

oil-

over.

Today, the unique beauty and durability

once again available

of milk paint

is

powder form.

It's

in

popular as a finish for

include milk, lime, and natural colorants

reproduction furniture, especially Shaker

seeds, and minerals, were

and Mennonite pieces, adds a period or

found close at hand and inexpen-

country look to new interior kitchen or

like berries,

all

sively,

paint

and the result was highly durable

whose

quality

antique pieces

is

evidenced by the

we admire today

that

still

boast their original coats of paint. Milk paint in

was

liquid

not able to be mass-produced

form because the milk protein

caused the paint

to sour,

and

in

time the

bathroom cabinets, and works

well

wide range of accessories from

houses and bread boxes

on a bird-

to candlesticks

and clocks. To make the paint at home, you mix the powder with water blender.

You

in

a

might wonder why you

should go to the trouble of mixing, when

PAINT AND TOOLS milk paint powder (see Resources, page

purchasing information) kitchen mixer (blender) bowl measuring cup polyester paintbrush

182,

for

0000

steel wool or 220-grit

sandpaper tack cloth or lint-free rag wood sealer such as double boiled linseed oil. antique oil. antique

paste wax, or beeswax

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

143


there

hundreds of premixed paints

are

to have a

more weathered

look, rough

it

up

ready and waiting at any hardware store,

with

but milk paint has special qualities that

rubbing away paint

make

dies and trim. There are instructions for

worth the extra effort for those

it

sandpaper or

fine in

gauge steel wool by areas around nan-

achieving an

interested

in

authentic

historic

finish.

Unlike regular paint, which

wood,

coats

milk

sinks

actually

the

into

wood and binds fibers,

paint

to

the

creating a strong

bond that

will last for

gen-

erations without chipping or peeling.

dries quickly

It

to a hard finish that allows

the natural grain of the

wood

to

Milk paint

show through. must be applied

to raw or untreated

or

it

will

wood

not be able to

absorb and bind properly; if

you put milk paint over

regular paint or varnish

peel off.

will

Because

it

it

These milk painted cupboard doors were sanded lightly in areas that would naturally have become worn with age.

is

need

absorbed by the wood, you

will

your finished

project to

protect

humidity and

spills.

even beeswax

Use

flat

to seal

distressed

effect

under

varnish or

undercoat when working with milk paint,

finishing

for

included with

most milk paint products.

144

or

Antiquing (page 146). Omit the varnish

Instructions

If

aged

from

it

for a truly authentic look,

historic

this

are

you want your newly painted heirloom

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

and darken the new wood

first

with a non-

sealing stain or a dark red milk paint

so that the worn patches

will

authentic look of aged wood-

wash

have the


INSTRUCTIONS Step 1 Mix instructions.

applied to

Step 4 Apply

paint according to the manufacturer's

Remember

new

must be wood only.

that milk paint

or previously untreated

Step 2

Apply paint evenly, overlapping the strokes

as

as possible.

little

when

Air

bubbles

will

leave spots

they dry, so paint a few extra strokes to remove

a second coat for solid coverage. Sand lightly again. Step 5 Use a suitable sealer to protect your project.

TIP: To check the color, paint a sample, let it dry for V2 hour, then rub on some oil. To pro-

duce

a

lighter color,

add more water. For

a

darker color, apply 2 coats.

any bubbles.

Note: The surface will look chalky when when the sealer

dries, but this will disappear

it

is

applied.

Step 3

Lightly rub the

surface with steel wool or

sandpaper. This removes any milk paint residue, as well

as any wood fibers that have been raised by

the milk paint.

Remove any dust

with a tack cloth or

lint-free rag.

ALTERNATIVES Milk paint can be used like regular paint for color-

washing on new wood.

It

produces a translucent

finish similar to a colored stain

and enhances the

natural grain and character of the wood.

You can also stencil with milk paint, but add

ess water to the powder because you

will

require

a thicker paint for this decorating technique.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

145

cu


Antiquing reci The idea of antiquing

P e

latex paint, low

is

new

or stripped

give

the

furniture,

SHEEN give

to

appearance of

old layers of paint that

weathered

have

the

furniture

worn

and

years. Today's furniture

is

over

often

cheap wood, and antiquing

the

made

of

adds char-

shellac; this

will

sinking into the natural resins

wood

a

coat of

stop the paint from

wood and prevent any in

the

wood and

knot-

holes from bleeding into your paint.

If

acter to any piece. Paints that have a

you're

palette of rustic or heritage colors cre-

apply a base coat before beginning your

ate the

most authentic look

niture;

these are muted colors such as

off-white, brick reds,

forest greens. in all

of period fur-

warm

Milk paint

blues, and is

available

the original shades and also lends

a genuine look to this finish.

Before applying water-based paint to

working on

finishes.

as is

you'll

painted

furniture,

Choose an appropriate see parts of

it

when the piece

sanded. This sideboard

was given

a coat of

shellac, then dark green paint, followed

by a top coat of

sanded down

medium

to the

green, then

wood.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

steel wool

white latex primer, satin paintbrush

mixing containers and rags varnish (optional) toothbrush (optional)

PAINTED FINISH: at least 2 colors of latex paint, flat

or satin

sheen

paintbrushes fine- and medium-grade sandpaper

146

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

color

oak stain (optional)

beeswax

(optional)

matte varnish

stir

sticks


&A INSTRUCTIONS

Step 6 The

For the best results, prepare your surface

21 1

lowing the guidelines

JJJ

^3

in

small

the Preparation sec-

Step 1 Base

a^j

Step 2 Apply

^^

the

a coat of light green to the

The last-applied paint

whole surface, painting

wood

show of

Apply 1 coat of latex

coat:

primer.

22

areas

base color, or the original wood, and a little more of the first color.

tion (page 42).

W

finished

should

effect

fol-

in

color

the direction of the

will

be dominant.

For protection, add a

grain.

coat of matte varnish.

TIPS: For an even more authentically aged look dip a toothbrush into dry stain, then rub your finger over the brush to flick small dots of stain over

the painted surface, but be careful not to overdo it. As the paint dries, you can always wipe off the dots if the effect looks artificial.

As an alternative to varnish, put a little oak some beeswax or furniture wax. Mix together well and rub over the whole piece. stain into

Step 3 When

the paint

is

tacky or nearly dry, rub

the "wear" areas with steel wool. The paint

come

off easily.

Remove more

will

Buff with a soft cloth. This will give an authentic period look to

the piece.

paint from places

most wear and tear on an

that would have had the

actually old piece, e.g., around the handles, the

edges, and over the trim.

ALTERNATIVES It's

interesting to play around with different colors

and combinations. Stick to the heritage colors

Step 4 When the

first

coat

is dry,

apply the dark

green paint to the whole surface. Paint over the areas rubbed down

in

step 3, always

in

the direc-

because some areas can be rubbed through each coat to the wood base. Step 5 Let the dark green coat dry overnight and then sand off areas of paint with medium-grade sandpaper. Once again, remove more from around the handles, edges, and trim. Don't oversand. Keep tion

of the grain

stepping back to judge your work.

148

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

an authentic look. Above

left,

I

used a

light

for

blue

with a colonial blue as the top color.

On the

right,

I

painted on

first

toffee brown and

then dark brown over a cream base. To highlight the

moldings

I

applied

some

sanded them back a

brick red paint,

and then

Because they are worn as areas wouldn't be as recessed, they little.

around handles and edges.


Crackle Finish "Crackling"

finishes that sion or at

one of the most popular

is

I

demonstrate on

home shows. A

televi-

crackle finish

base coat begins coat

simulates the look of paint that has

and

aged and cracked.

it

way

ful

and

to enliven

add

It's

another wonder-

medium

coat. As the crackle

to

as

also

dries,

it

reacts with

furniture

the crackle

medium

new

pieces.

and begins

to crack

to

open

The

Although you can get varied effects by

and

using different types of crackle varnish,

size of the cracks de-

I

prefer a crackle

medium

that

is avail-

ness

some

of crackle

The most exciting crackling results are

from

color.

different

Crackle

combinations

medium

is

applied

up.

pends on the

able at craft and art supply stores and paint stores.

The top

then applied,

is

secondhand

character

crack.

dries, the

of

thick-

the

layer

medium

the thicker the coat,

of

the larger the cracks;

in

the thinner the coat, the smaller and

between the base coat and the top

more numerous the cracks.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

color you want for the finished

latex paint, flat or satin will

be the color of the cracks

PAINTED FINISH: latex paint is

this

flat or satin

— this

the top coat, so choose the

project

crackle

medium

2 paintbrushes rollers

varnish

and/or sponge sticks low or high sheen

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

149


INSTRUCTIONS </>

TIPS: Practice

For the best results, prepare your surface

lowing the guidelines

in

fol-

the Preparation section

(page 42).

Step 1 Base and

0)

let

Step

coat: Apply 1 coat of latex paint

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

of the surface.

want

cracks to be

medium tions

duce

with

hairdryer

a

will

ALTERNATIVES Remember, no two

If

the same.

the

projects

will

Everyone has a

ever look exactly slightly

different

touch, and products vary, but this effect always

fairly

looks stunning. Here are the color combinations

uniform, apply the

even

paint

different effects.

crackle medium over 100%

you

Drying the

speed up the crackling. The crackle medium and the paint can be applied with a roller or a sponge to produce

Apply

2

the

o

before tackling your

first

project.

for three different looks:

an

in

layer. Variain

the thickness of the

medium

will

pro-

different sizes of cracks.

Step 3

DARK BROWN RUSTY BROWN

Let dry for about 2 hours. Different

brands vary

in

the drying time, so be sure to

read the instructions on your package carefully.

RED GREEN

Base coat Top coat

Step 4 Using even

strokes,

moving

in

one

direction only, apply the top coat of paint over

the crackle medium. The thicker the top coat, the thicker the cracks

will

ÂŁ5E.;=_ -

be.

:

life,j^ ^4^-.

JHHMHHBHMH "

:

"

Step 5 Apply a coat of varnish for protection when the paint is completely dry. Low sheen gives an antiqued or aged effect; high sheen

good

150

for a

more contemporary

effect.

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

is

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Aged Plaster r

e c

i

p e s

For col ored glazes:

PARTS LATEX PAINT PART WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQU ID 1 PART WATER For whitewash 2 PARTS WHITE LATEX 2 1

This easy finish

PAINT

the per-

is

1

fect

technique

stark

new

to

plaster a

give

more subdued

look,

and

moldings are readily available and

inex-

pensive, but

left

pots,

as white plaster, they

can look cheap and ordinary. By adding a touch of color

new

piece, giving

the beauty and person-

it

figurines,

Plaster sconces,

of your

PART WATER

and some whitewash

you can highlight the cutwork and shape

ality

that

comes

ter finish

with age. An aged plas-

can also be applied to wood,

plastic, or fiberglass, giving

new

trim

the rich look of old-fashioned plaster moldings. Just

make sure

to prime the

surface properly before you start painting,

and use a white base coat.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: (if

pale pink/terra-cotta latex paint, flat

required) white latex paint, flat or satin

paintbrush

PAINTED FINISH: pale orange/terra-cotta latex pa flat or satin

nt,

or satin

white latex paint, flat water-based glazing liquid paintbrush soft rags

mixing containers

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

151


*m

"1 \

»


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 5 As

For the best results, prepare your surface following

tacky to the touch

the guidelines

rag. This will leave the white

If

in

the Preparation section (page 42).

you are working on new plaster,

sealed, as plaster

Step 1 Base

it

must

first

be

the paint begins to dry

— when

it

is

polish the surface with a soft

predominantly

in

crevices, creating the dusty look of old plaster.

CO

very porous.

is

coat: Apply a coat of white latex

paint and let dry for 2 hours.

Step 2 it

Mix the orange/terra-cotta glaze and brush

on randomly, leaving spaces of white base coat.

Hp

Step 3 Mix the

pink/terra-cotta glaze and brush

on over the spaces, overlapping the orange a

it

bit.

Let dry completely.

ALTERNATIVE For a darker finish on this

Step 4 Mix the whitewash. Brush surface, making sure

it

gets into

0)

the

it

all

over the entire

the cracks and

same

angel sconce.

I

sim-

chose deeper shades of terra-cotta paint and rubbed away most of the whitewash glaze. ply

crevices.

£^^

;

.

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j

A FINISHES FOR FURNITURE, TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

153


Faux Tortoiseshell recipe 2

TABLESPOONS ARTIST'S ACRYLIC PAINT

CUPS WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID V4 CUP WATER 2

Because

of

beauty, the

its

classic

look of tor-

toiseshell has

plain

been re-created by deco-

rative painters for

Here

hundreds of years,

The glowing browns, ochres, and umber of the natural seashell are reproduced

the red paint

wooden

tray with a

makes

an elegant edging. To

reproduce

a

tortoiseshell effect,

strokes. Faux tortoiseshell looks best

use

on small, smooth surfaces; sconces,

rather

screens, door panels, and furniture are

paint,

sophisticated finish,

have dressed up a

tortoiseshell panel;

by painting and softening using diagonal

perfect for this

I

will

artist's acrylics

than

latex

as the colors

generate a more authentic

finish.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

V2" brush

pale yellow latex paint, semigloss 3" sponge stick or small roller

small artist's brush

PAINTED FINISH: raw sienna and burnt umber

low-tack painter's tape badger softening brush or soft-bristle

artist's

acrylic paints

water-based glazing

liquid

black latex or artist's acrylic paint

two 2" brushes

154

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

sea sponge

paintbrush disposable plates high-gloss varnish


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 5 Draw black squiggles

For the best results, prepare your surface following

brush

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Using a

with

the

artist's

between the the burnt umber dabs.

sponge

stick or roller

2 coats of pale yellow

2 to 4 hours.

Step 6 Holding

the badger softening brush at a

angle to the surface, brush gently

right

nal direction.

The glazes should be

in

softly

a diago-

blended.

Do not overblend or the colors will become muddy. The last soft stroke should be on the diagonal. Step 7 Remove the tape. I

a thin yellow outline

left

(base coat) as a border

Step 2 Mask

off the panel area with tape. Mix the

raw sienna glaze and apply

it

in

random diagonal

around the tortoiseshell

and painted the

panel,

strokes, covering the whole surface.

rest of the tray red.

Step 3 Break up the

Step 8

with a

glaze by dabbing the surface

damp sea sponge.

apply

2

Let dry

coats

and then of

high-

gloss varnish for protection

and sheen.

ALTERNATIVES Red tortoiseshell over a pinky-red basecoat.

Step 4 Mix the

burnt

brush, apply

irregular

it

in

umber

glaze. With the V2"

dabs working across the

wet glaze and along the diagonal as

in

step 2.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

^^ Q}

the Preparation section (page 42).

to avoid brushstrokes, apply paint. Let dry for

in

155


CHAPTER

X

METALLIC FINISHES From the ornate

look of gilding to the weath-

ered effects of verdigris and faux rust, surfaces that give the illusion of

a metal finish have become extremely popular

in recent years.

Although metallic finishes are often used to decorate walls in restaurants, in the sories,

home they're most

offices,

suited to furniture, acces-

and trim. Exposed to the atmosphere, real metals such

as bronze, copper, lead, and brass will naturally tarnish and corrode, acquiring a smooth patina. Happily, this lovely pati-

nation can easily be simulated with paint, not only on metal objects but on wood, pottery, and even plaster.

cotta pots, wooden

New

terra-

window boxes, and even lamp bases

can be antiqued so that they look as though they were crafted years ago. Gold and silver finishes can

make the

most ordinary object luxurious. For a more contemporary effect, silver sheet metal

is

an interesting

finish, ideal for flat

surfaces like tabletops, screens, or even walls. This homemade ladder has been given a fans rust treatment and now makes a great decorative (and practical) shelf nnit.

156


Sheet Metal recipe PARTS SILVER LATEX PAINT 1 PART WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID OR 2

The

dull

polished look of

sheet metal works well

modern

3

contemporary

or

homes. While

this

unusual effect,

I've

many times

in

is

1

used

base

to reveal the black

POWDER

CUP WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID

coat, you create the

sion

it

with great success on table-

some

of the silver-colored glaze

TABLESPOONS SILVER

an

By scratching off

metal

of

illu-

sheets.

The wax protects the black base coat.

made

tops and screens, and even on floors.

Authentic-looking studs

For this faux finish to look authentic, the

pushing a

coin

surface you are transforming must be

removing

it,

and adding a touch of white

highlight.

The finished project

flat

and smooth.

A

layer of paste

black

base

wax

then

coat,

colored glaze

is

is

spread over a thick

silver-

painted over the wax.

into

are

the

wet glaze,

is

a real

conversation piece! Note: Always wear a ing

powdered

mask when

paint.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

spatula

black latex paint, satin roller, brush, and paint tray PAINTED FINISH:

and paint tray sponge brushes thin artist's brush

paste wax

a small

silver latex paint or artist's acrylic,

or silver powder

water-based glazing mixing container screwdriver

158

roller

3" or 4"

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

amount

of gold artist's

acrylic paint a small

liquid

by

amount

of white latex paint

coin

semigloss varnish

mix-


INSTRUCTIONS

(0

For the best results, prepare your surface following

the guidelines

Step 1 Base and

let

in

"5

the Preparation section (page 42).

coat: Apply 2 coats of black paint

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

0)

CO coin add a

little

gold paint. Scratch around the

imprint and through the middle with a screwdriver,

creating a black

Step 7 Add to

one side

sent your

Step 2 Spread

a thin coat of

wax over the surface

with a spatula. Let dry for 2 to

3 hours, depending

line.

white highlights with an artist's brush of the stud.

light

These white marks

repre-

source, so paint them along the

same side of each stud. Step 8 Let dry overnight.

Finish with 2 coats of

semigloss varnish.

on the humidity and the thickness of the wax. The

wax should be hard. Step 3 Mix the silver-colored glaze and apply over the wax coat with a roller.

Step 4 With

it

a sponge brush, brush out the glaze

to create wide, bold linear patterns.

Step 5 With the

screwdriver, pull lines throu gh the

glaze to create the look of sheets of metal overlapping; be careful not to

remove the black base coat.

Step 6 Make the "studs" by pressing a coin into

the wet glaze. the

coin,

indentation

and left

Remove in

the

by

the

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

159


Verdigris recipes For whitewash:

PARTS WHITE LATEX

2

Verdigris

the

is

effect

PAINT

when

bronze

and copper tarnish over time through oxidation. This

weathered

finish

re-created instantly with paint

that of the terra-

cotta

pot

PART WATER

1

produced

lar to

in

can be

color.

Terra-cotta

is

used on numerous

New

metal, plaster urns, columns, statues,

and terra-cotta pots can be beautifully aged. Here, finish

to

a

have applied the verdigris

I

terra-cotta

bronze base coat. But

if

pot,

using

a

you can't find

metallic colors (available at art supply stores),

use a burnt orange color simi-

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT: bronze or copper acrylic paint, satin 2" brush PAINTED FINISH: a light and a dark shade of blue/ green latex paint

160

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

so

apply a coat of shellac before you start,

a color

surfaces, indoors and outdoors.

base

very porous,

range of blues and greens. Verdigris can be

as the

white latex paint 2" brush rags water spray bottle matte varnish (optional)


INSTRUCTIONS If

you are working on a terra-cotta or new plaster

pot,

be sure to seal the surface

first

with a coat

of shellac.

Step 1 Base

Apply

coat:

1

coat of bronze paint or whatever base coat you have chosen. Let dry.

Step 2 Apply

a coat of light

blue/green paint and leave for a

it

few minutes to get tacky.

Step 3

With the water spray

bottle, spray the paint at the

top of the pot so that the water

runs down. The base coat should be revealed

in

Step 7 With a soft cloth, immediately rub off some of the whitewash and buff the surface, leaving white

in

the crevices.

areas as the water eats through the paint.

Step 8

Step 4 Dab areas cloth to soften

of the

wet surface with a folded

and widen some of the streaks. Let

If

the pot

is

to be

used outdoors, apply 2

coats of matte varnish for protection.

dry.

ALTERNATIVE Here a verdigris table. To

finish

was applied

add to the effect, metal

were painted on to give the (see page nish

whole surface, and

and 4 and

let dry.

let

it

illusion of

for instructions.)

was added

temporary

Step 5 Apply the dark blue/green

158

for protection

to a

lines

round

and bolts

sheet metal

A high-gloss

var-

and a more con-

look.

paint over the

get tacky. Repeat steps 3

You should now have

light

and

dark green patches with streaks of bronze.

Step 6 Mix the whitewash as indicated and brush a small amount of it sparingly onto the surface, getting into

any crevices or cracks.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

161


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Faux Rust

recipe 1

1

CUP WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID

TABLESPOON ARTIST'S ACRYLIC PAINT

You are usually greeted a

with

smile

2

when you

explain that you have

gone

TABLESPOONS WATER

in

layers

tially

to the trou-

and then

par-

removed with water.

Realistic-looking faux rust

depends on

ble of reproducing rust, since the rest of

the random application of the paint so

the population

don't

but

it

is

is

trying to get rid of

it,

an ideal finish for fixtures, lamp

bases, sconces, or window boxes, and will

give

cheap metal

furniture a

more

worry

too

much

smooth, even brush strokes I've

used

To create this effect, paint

is built

up

using

this time,

artist's acrylic paints

because

the colors are more realistic. You only

need a small amount

interesting character.

about

for this finish,

so

why not experiment with the rest?

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

two 2" brushes

charcoal gray latex paint, satin PAINTED FINISH: yellow ochre and red oxide artist's acrylic paints

mixing containers

water spray bottle

water-based glazing

matte varnish

liquid

sea sponge rag

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

163


INSTRUCTIONS (ft

3

OC

X s

For the best results, prepare your surface following

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of the charcoal

gray and

let

dry 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2 Mix the

colored glazes.

iS

Step 5 Spray water over the

surface. This

will

open up the paint to reveal more base coat. Dab with a smooth rag. folded so there are no creases.

Step 6 Sponge on

yellow ochre glaze to small

areas and soften with a brush. Let

Step 7 When the

paint

is dry.

dry.

finish with

1 coat of

matte varnish for protection.

Step 3 Apply the

red oxide glaze randomly over

the surface using a sea sponge to create a mottled effect,

leaving

30%

of the

base color peeking

through. Let dry.

Step 4 Holding the softening brush at a right angle to the surface, soften lightly to make a cloudy effect.

L^M T

^^

M

^H

NOTE: The rust effect can be varied by playing with the technique until you get the desired results. Just make sure that the paint is applied unevenly.

P'^^^^^^^^J *0*

p

^^^^^^^^5^^*^^"

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164

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

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Gilding

Gilding produces a rich,

look that

is

warm, antique

very rewarding to create. The

ancient art of gilding

is

complex and

gold

is

rubbed off the gold

base glows through the small projects

size, the red

gold. Start with

lamp bases, plaster

like

expensive, but today there are simpler,

molds, and fixtures. Then try large sur-

cheaper methods

faces, or designs on walls, moldings,

for creating this magi-

cal finish. Imitation gold leaf,

Dutch or composition metal able

in

known as

leaf, is avail-

4-inch square sheets from art

supply and fine paint stores. The leaf

is

placed over a layer of sticky varnish

and

furniture.

lowing page

The vestibule on the

was decorated

leaf stars.

The stars were

the walls,

filled

fol-

with gold-

first

drawn on

with gold size, and

in

then covered with gold leaf using the

page

same technique as

the one used for the

167, the surface was previously painted

cherubs. Gold leaf

was

called gold size. For the cherub on

with a red latex paint so that

when the

also applied to

the sconce and mirror.

PAINT AND TOOLS BASE COAT:

small artist's brush

deep red

soft rag

latex paint, flat or satin

paintbrush

dry brush semigloss or high-gloss varnish depending on the look desired

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

PAINTED FINISH: Gold size, oil- or water-based Gold leaf (Dutch [composition] metal leaf is the most affordable)

oak stain (optional)

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

165


1

I i

>


M

INSTRUCTIONS For the best results, prepare your surface following

the Preparation section (page 42).

the guidelines

in

Step 1 Base

coat: Apply 2 coats of red paint

let

and

dry for 2 to 4 hours.

C5

Step 5 Polish the surface with a Step 6 Add a clear coat of semi-

soft rag.

or high-gloss var-

nish for protection.

Step 2 Brush on the

gold size over the base coat

with a small brush. Cover including the

gold size, there size,

most

of the surface,

nooks and crannies. Wherever there will

no gold leaf

be gold. Where there

will

is

is

no gold

adhere.

TIPS: Work in a draft-free room. Be sure your hands are very dry, and don't wear gloves. The leaf will tear as you brush it onto the tacky surface. Don't worry, just keep applying until you've covered as much of the surface as you wanted to.

ALTERNATIVES Dutch metal leaf also comes I've

used

silver leaf

the gold looks too new,

If

a

little

in

other metals. Here

over black artist's acrylic paint. it

can be aged by rubbing

oak stain over the gilded piece before you

apply the protective coat of varnish. Or add a

Step 3

Let the gold size dry for approximately 1

hour, until the surface

a sheet of gold leaf

and

will

is in

bit of

stain directly to the varnish.

very tacky to the touch. Hold

one hand

break up easily) and

lay

it

(it's

very delicate

over the tacky sur-

face. With a soft brush, gently brush the gold sheet

onto the surface, continuing

until

the whole area

.

ff

?

a

v? si

'j'-^v'

Ik

is

-a

SPfe^

covered. Let dry completely.

Step 4 The

gold size

step. Test by rubbing the surface. wait. With a soft brush,

If

dust off the loose bits of

pieces of gold leaf for patching and small

ects.

some

If

you're afraid you've rubbed off too

areas, repeat the process

more gold

'V^M*'

it's still sticky,

gold leaf, exposing the red base coat. Save the tle

fcS&^l

must be dry before the next

in

lit-

proj-

much

i

S

H%

'^%

4 Mi

in

those areas with

size.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

167


CHAPTER

&

STENCILING AND

BLOCK PAINTING If

you would like more detail on your

walls, floors, and furniture, stencils,

and block painting can be used

to

highlight a room, take the place of a molding, or decorate a

piece of painted furniture. Both techniques are highly

and are similar

effective,

in that they transfer painted pat-

terns directly onto the surface, but they vary greatly in their execution.

common and the two methods. A sten-

Stenciling versatile of cil is

is

the more

a design that

is

cut out from a

piece of metal, cardboard, plastic, or Mylar. To create the design, you hold the stencil

rate and

fill

thousands

firmly against the surface you want to decoin the holes

with paint. There are literally

of designs available,

from simple motifs to elabo-

rate architectural details. In this cheery dining room, a lemon-tree pattern was block painted onto the wall panels, creating a festive setting both for entertaining guests and for family meals.

168


Stenciling Stenciling

one of the easiest and

is

most inexpensive ways

of adding detail

rooms and

but an increasingly popular decorating trend

is

stenciling repeated patterns

all

The

over a wall, which has the look of wall-

that

paper, but

you don't have to be an artist to paint

expensive.

and pattern

to

furniture.

greatest thing about stenciling

intricate motifs

is

and designs with a

cut stencil, as the difficult work

designing

and

been done.

All

cutting

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has

that remains

position the stencil and

fill

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

already

you to

is

for

in

the holes

are

designs craft

less

far

endless

available

in

and paint stores,

and there are specialty stores

stencilers

for

as well as mail-order

with paint. Stencils can be used for decorating

most

There

pre-

is

furniture, fixtures, walls,

when working

and

floors,

catalogs,

so you

will

always be able to find

with

uneven

a

walls and for highlighting arches,

beams,

your needs. Patterns can range from

and are

ideal

design

doorways, and windows. They're com-

complex

monly used as a border around a room,

wall

that

suits

to extremely simple, from

designs to

tiny

motifs

huge

used on

PAINT AND TOOLS blunt-cut bristle stencil brushes,

paper towels

sponges, roller tape or stencil repositionable adhesive pencil, ruler, and eraser

liquid stencil paints, stencil

creams, paint sticks, spray paint. or latex paint

stencil

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

171


Cardboard stencils don't

last

as long as

the plastic ones, but they work fine for small areas. Metal stencils are usually

used

for painting

on a

face or on paper. Mylar

flat furniture suris

a high-grade,

able, transparent plastic sheet,

stencils cut from Mylar are the satile;

and the

most

ver-

they are also very strong and easy

to clean. ble,

pli-

Because they are

thin

and

flexi-

they wrap easily around corners. The

designs

in

a Mylar stencil are precision-cut

Giant stencils were used as a mural on this

using

plain wall, furniture. Luckily,

no matter how complex

or simple the stencil, the painting tech-

nique

is

the same.

If

there

design you are looking

match

is

for,

easy,

might be

Water-based

paint

can

be washed

perhaps to

based creams and sticks wipe

shapes

is

difficult to cut precisely.

rag

when the

painting

is

completed.

like

rela-

The cost

depending on the

proper care they should last a lifetime.

tape. tion

It's

mended

with adhesive

a good idea to start up a collec-

and share them with friends. And look

for a stencil

library

where you can rent

stencils.

Precut Stencils Stencils are made from of different herbs were stenciled above this kitchen counter.

The names hard plastic, cardboard, metal, or Mylar.

172

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

off oil-

off with a

and complexity of the design, but with

Small rips can be

for

sharper points and finer pattern definition.

but more complex designs

of stencils varies greatly

size

beam, which allows

Mylar stencils with soap and water, and

your own. Cutting out simple patterns

tively

laser

a particular

a fabric pattern, you can always cut

stars, fish, or geometric

a


Own

Designing and Cutting Your cils

Sten-

you want to design and cut your own

If

patterns,

stencil

you can find Mylar

large sheets at craft stores.

tern that fits

in

A simple

in

pat-

with your decor can be

copied from fabric or a book.

best to

It's

shiny or high-gloss finishes.

Do not

with water-based paint over an coat. off.

The

stencil

work

will

stencil

oil

base

soon scratch

Although stencils work well on plain

surfaces, they really add dimension applied over painted finishes,

in

when

particular

keep the design as simple as possible, as

complex pattern

cutting a

is difficult. First,

enlarge or reduce the design to the size that you require on a photocopy machine.

Tape the photocopy to a cutting board, and then tape a piece of Mylar on top. Either trace the pattern with a marker or cut the

Mylar out directly over the photocopy using a craft knife.

the design

If

is

going to be

used as a border, cut small holes as istration

marks

at either side of the stencil

for repositioning. filling in

When you

are painting or

the stencil, add a

next registration mark

fit

when the

to the right or the

paint to

little

this registration mark. This will

moved

reg-

left.

over the

stencil is

Wipe

off

these small marks as you move along the surface. it's

a

If

you are cutting your own stencil,

good idea

to cut a spare

one as a

backup. For a

Before you begin, lay out within easy reach.

and

full

description of the

dif-

your materials

colorwashing, ragging, dragging, fresco,

and even painted stucco.

Before You Begin Before you all

list

all

start, lay

your tools out. You'll need one stencil

brush for each color.

It's

a

good idea

to

ferent paints available for stenciling, see

test the stencil on paper or a board. This

pages 35

test

to 36.

Base Coat for Stenciling You can

sample enables you

to

check the

stencil

repeat patterns and the positioning of your

on most surfaces with the exception of

design. Tape the sample to the wall or sur-

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

173

c o c


JjA

face you are about to stencil to

jjj

the height and position are

o s

Stenciling

Using

Paint Water-based are

amount and

Stencil

liquid stencil

paints

for stenciling,

comes

stencil paint

whereas

bottles,

right.

Liquid

most commonly used

because

make sure

latex

small

in

comes

paint

in

larger quantities.

Varnishing

Stenciled

must be varnished

floors

and

furniture

for protection,

easy to layer colors, several

and a coat of matte varnish should be

colors can be used at once, and the paint

applied over stenciled wall areas that are

dries very fast. You can use commercial

likely to

latex

it's

paint,

following

the

instructions

below, but latex paint does not dry as fast

as stencil

paint.

You only need a

tiny

be washed and scrubbed

like

a

bathroom or kitchen.

Stenciling Using

Crayons stencil

Creams

or Stencil

Stencil crayons (or sticks)

creams are the same; one

pressed

into a crayon, the other

spill-proof pots.

If

is

and

com-

comes

in

you are using stencil

crayons, remove the protective seal from

the

tip with

you

begin.

a piece of paper towel before

Apply

some

of

directly onto the Mylar, well

the

crayon

away from the

cut design, and pick up the paint from there, using a stencil brush.

If

you are

using stencil cream, remove the protective seal from the surface and pick up the paint directly from the pot.

Stenciling Faux Wallpaper

Stencil-

ing walls to look like hand-painted wallpa-

per

is

currently

looks great!

It's

real wallpaper,

look.

Choose

theme mark

174

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE

very fashionable,

and

a fraction of the cost of

and gives a more subtle

a motif that

of your room.

The

a pattern on the wall

works with the first

step

is

to

where the sten-


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

cil will

go.

Use a plumb

ruler or yardstick to is

a level, and a

line,

make sure

the pattern

positioned correctly and spaced evenly.

It's

a personal choice

or far apart to put

your eye

how close together

each

stencil design

look very busy, and too few

impact of the design.

doorframes, and you would stripes. At

many

the best judge: Too

is

built-in

will

will

lose the

windows,

Ignore

fixtures just as

hanging wallpaper or painting

if

left,

white stars were stenciled

over light blue walls, creating a unique pattern.

the middle of each star

In

we

pressed an ordinary upholstery tack, also painted white, which

almost

three-dimensional,

embossed

makes

the pattern exactly

like

wallpaper.

STENCILING DOS AND DON'TS Do make sure your surface

is

clean and

Don't overload your brush with paint.

This pretty stencil pattern was created by first painting the wall yellow and lavender, then applying a leaf stencil in contrasting colors.

Don't stencil on high-gloss surfaces.

Do apply 2 coats

Do wash brushes

areas that receive considerable wear,

dry before you start to stencil.

project

(with

well after

completing the

paint thinner for

creams,

Do remember that

water-based paints such as acrylic and

wipe

latex).

or paint thinner stencil well by soaking

paint tray or sink thinner,

excess

and

in

then

it

in

in

for

example, on furniture.

crayons, and japan paints; with water for

Do clean the

of protective varnish

it

if

you

make

a mistake,

off immediately using either water

and redo that area.

a

either water or paint softly

wipe

off

the

paint.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

175


c O S 0)

INSTRUCTIONS Step Step 2 Mark where the

1 Lay out your tools before you begin.

a pencil so the ciling is

Step 3

stencil is going to go. Use marks can be erased when the sten-

completed.

back of the tion. This is

Either spray the

back of the stencil or use

low-tack painter's tape to hold the stencil

Step 4

Step 6 Always use a fresh brush for each color. Step 7 When all colors are on, remove the stencil carefully and make sure there is no paint on the

in

place.

Dip the stencil brush into the paint and dab

off the

excess on a paper towel

almost

dry. This is

done by

brush on paper towel.

It's

until

the brush

swirling the

stencil before

done by

Step 8 When the cil

moving

lining

project

marks with an eraser

it

to the next posi-

up the repeat markings. is

remove penamount of paint

finished,

or a small

thinner.

is

edge of the

important because

it

pre-

vents the paint from leaking underneath the stencil.

Step 5 Apply the either

paint to the stencil. You can

pounce the brush up and down over the

design or use a circular motion. Work from the

edges of the little

stencil

toward the center. Start with a

color and build, adding color

and shading.

NOTE: Some stencils come with several layers. Stencil the whole area with the first stencil in the series, and then repeat with the second and sometimes the third stencil overlay. Follow the instructions that are always included with these stencil packs.

176

DEBBIE TRAVIS' PAINTED HOUSE


Block Painting recipe Blocking, or block paint-

one side of each block

PARTS LATEX PAINT 2 PARTS WATER-BASED GLAZING LIQUID 2

ing,

is

nique

another old techthat

been

has

pressing

enjoying a resurgence of popularity. Tra-

blocks of

ditionally,

wood were carved

with intricate patterns, then rolled paint or dyes,

and stamped

onto walls. Today, the printing blocks are

made from

soft rubber,

and there

are a variety of patterns and designs available.

They usually take the form of

kits that contain several

pieces of cut

rubber that combine to build up a

form

Each

has

uni-

produces

it

onto the sur-

an

embossed

Block painting looks fabulous over a painted

Colorwashing,

finish.

choices.

If

you want to leave your walls

then latex paint

plain,

be

should

used.

You

in

a satin finish

can

apply

this

technique using straight latex paint, but the images

have a more translucent

will

quality

pieces centered around a theme, and

based

glaze, or

you build your own design by painting

come

with the block painting kits.

kit

fresco,

stucco, or ragging are good background

several

pattern.

then

effect that has a rather unique quality,

in

directly

This

face.

and

glaze

with

if

you mix the latex paint with water-

use the colored glazes that

PAINT AND TOOLS water-based paint and water-based

latex paint, satin, or skip this

step

if

you're applying the patte

glazing liquid

'n

over a completed painted wall

or

finish

blocking glaze (available with kits) V2" brushes 1 for each color used round artist's brush for making vines

BLOCK PAINTING: blocking

kit

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

177


\

*fj

*Z7


INSTRUCTIONS

Step 4 Press

For information on the blocking

kit

I've

used here,

see Resources, page 182.

Step 1 Base

less bold. The idea

coat: Apply 2 coats of latex, or

plete a painted

finish,

and

the pad

let

com-

down

firmly

on the

wall surface

and then remove. Press down again; the image is

to

have

some

will

W)

be

prints stronger

than others. Bend pad sideways for half a

leaf.

dry overnight.

(9

Q.

o

Step 2 Decide where you

are going to put the

blocking design, and mark with a pencil or masking

Step 5

After 3 or

4 presses

(or different leaves)

reapply the glaze and repeat.

tape.

Step 3 Hold

the leaf block by the tab. Mix colored

glaze as indicated. Using a V2" brush, apply colored glaze to the face of the rubber, either 1 color or a little

of both.

Make sure

the whole surface

is

cov-

ered up to the cut marks at the base of the tab.

Step 6 Block in the leaves first, then the flowers. Step 7 For vines, pour separate small puddles of clear glaze artist's

rate

to

and green glaze on a

brush

into

on the brush. Use a

make

plastic plate. Dip the

each glaze, keeping colors sepapull, twist,

and turn motion

the vines look translucent and natural.

Vines should connect leaves, not overlap them.

Step 8

Walls do not need a coat of varnish for

protection unless they are

in

a

bathroom or kitchen.

FINISHES FOR FURNITURE. TRIM. AND ACCESSORIES

179


BLOCK PAINTING ON FURNITURE Block painting on furniture gives the of freehand painting.

painting

is

the

the base coat

The technique

same as on

for block

Make sure

not high-gloss or oil-based,

is

or your designs

walls.

illusion

will

wipe

off.

When

you've

one

finished the block painting, applying

two coats of varnish

for protection.

This fabulous trompe (really a plain

or

armoire)

I'oeil

was

ated with a block painting four different book spines

actually cre-

kit.

in

bookcase

There are

the

and

kit,

you can simply apply them to the doors of the armoire following the block painting instructions, but

I

added an extra step to

The lemon-tree design on

this chair cushion echoes the design on the wall panels in this inviting room.

make

the books three-dimensional. First

press the blocks onto a sheet of plain

BLOCK PAINTING ON

paper and cut them out when they're

FABRIC

Next take the cardboard center of a paper

Block painting looks beautiful on fabric,

towel

and the technique

exactly the

is

same as

roll,

and cut

it

dry.

lengthwise down the

middle so that you have two hollow

half-

the one used on walls or furniture, you can

moon-shaped

even use the same

book spines with paper glue and trim

Use

kits.

fabric paint

and follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully. first,

Wash,

and

dry,

and then tape

it

iron the fabric

down

firmly with

masking tape. Once you've pressed on the blocks, the paint first

is

permanent, so practice

on some paper

until

you are pleased

with the color and design.

180

DEBBIE TRAVIS'S PAINTED HOUSE

pieces. Attach the painted off

any excess cardboard; then glue them onto the front of the armoire. As the glass

was missing from my "bookcase,"

I

glued

the spines to pieces of heavy cardboard that were painted dark gray and set into the

I

think

it

them

spaces where the glass had been. looks

terrific!


t.

i


Resources Painting Supplies

United States CALIFORNIA Paint Effects San Francisco Fillmore Street San Francisco, CA 94115

WASHINGTON

Ro-na Hardware (514) 599-5100 for the dealer nearest you. (across Quebec)

Daniel Smith 4128 21st Street Seattle.

call

WA 98134

(800) 426-6740 (mail-order catalog available)

Stencils

2426

(415) 292-7780

In

360 Main Avenue (Rte! Norwalk. CT 06851 (800) 243-5038

&

Associates call (800) 204-6278 for the dealer nearest you.

Canada,

(Montreal and Toronto)

Walls Alive

Art Supply Warehouse

(403) 531-1980 for the dealer nearest you.

Call

7)

(mail-order catalog available)

ILLINOIS Dick Blick Fine Art Co.

Box 1267

BRITISH COLUMBIA Ashley House Call (604) 734-4130 for the dealer nearest you.

(mail-order catalog available)

Living Colour

MARYLAND

Call (204)

(800) 866-6606 for a dealer near you.

NEW MEXICO Woodworker's Supply of New Mexico 5604 Alameda Place NE Albuquerque, NM 87113 (800) 645-9292 (mail-order catalog available)

the United States, call (800) 332-4660 for the dealer nearest you.

(California) All

stencils

book were

in this

designed by

The Stencil Library

MANITOBA

Duron Paint

Savoir-Faire In

(Alberta)

(Vancouver)

Galesburg. IL 61401 (800) 447-8192

call

Martin

ALBERTA

CONNECTICUT

P.O.

Canada

Stocksfield Hall Stocksfield, Northumberland

788-4114

for the

NE43 7TN England

dealer nearest you. (Winnipeg)

Block Painting

ONTARIO Bonds Decor 523-1534

Call (613)

for the

dealer nearest you. (Ottawa)

Backstreet

3905 Steve Reynolds Boulevard Norcross. GA 30093 (770) 381-7373

Home Hardware Call (519)

664-2252

for the

Cutbill

& Company

Ltd.

dealer nearest you. (across Canada)

21 A Sherman Avenue N Unit 207

Janovic Plaza

Lewiscraft

30-35 Thompson Avenue Long Island City, NY 11101

40 Commander Boulevard

Hamilton, ON L8L (905) 547-8525

(718) 786-4444 (mail-order catalog available)

MIS 3S2

NEW YORK

Lee's Art Shop

220 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 (212) 247-0110 (mail-order catalog available)

Company 308 Canal Street New York, NY 10013 (800) 221-6845 Pearl Paint

Inc.

TEXAS Texas Art Supply

Scarborough.

White Rose Nurseries (905) 477-3330 for the dealer nearest you. (across Canada) Call

Milk Paint

L'Oiseau Bleu Ste. Catherine East

4146

QC

HIV 1X2 (514) 527-3456

Montreal Decorators Ste. Catherine East

250

(713) 526-5221 (mail-order catalog available)

H2X 1L5

Montreal,

Homestead House Company In

Canada,

call

Paint

(416) 504-9984 nearest you.

for the dealer

(color brochure available)

QUEBEC

2001 Montrose Houston. TX 77006

182 RESOURCES

ON

(416) 291-8406

Montreal.

6N6

QC

(800) 215-6910

Old Village the United States, call (800) 498-7687 for the dealer nearest you.

In


Index 163

Acrylic paint, 34, African safari

Craft stencil paints,

theme, 20

finish, 151-53 See Oil-based paint Alkyd primer, 33 Antiquing, 146-48 Architectural style, 14-17 contemporary, 16-17

Aged plaster

Alkyd paint.

mass market from

fifties to

sev-

16

enties, of thirties

and

Victorian,

14-15

forties,

Artist's acrylics, 34,

15

"Cutting

Gilding,

Desert theme, 17-19

Diamond

pattern, 29,

163

119-20

71-72

79

bagging,

83 86 124, 135-37

flogging, 81,

fresco. 84,

67-69

Granite.

40

110

Dresser,

165-67

Glazes, 32, 36-38, 66,

Dining room, 27 Door frame, 69

Dragging brush,

40 34

Garden room, 26-27

51

in,"

46-48 47-48 varnishes, 38-39 preparing, stripping,

Creams, 35-36, 174 Cupboard doors, 144

Dragging,

High-adhesion primers, 33

Drop cloths, 43

Artist's brush, Artist's oils,

36

Crayons, 35-36, 147

High-gloss finish.

39

Home shows, 13 Eastern influence, 22

Badger-hair softening brush,

79-80

Bagging,

Base

40

39

English country style,

79 173

coat, 50.

Eggshell finish,

12-14

Inspiration,

25 Japan paints, 35

Experimentation, 12

for stenciling,

Basketweave pattern, 108 Block painting, 168,

177-80

on fabric, 180 on furniture, 180

179

instructions,

Books, 13 Brushes, 11, 41-42

41-42 42 types of, 40 cleaning, storing,

Carrara marble, Caulking,

129-31

44

Ceilings

34 in Victorian homes, 14 Cement floors, 46 Ceramic paint, 36 Chairs, 49 Checks, 102-3 Chest of drawers, 49 paint

for,

Cleaning

41-42

brushes, floors,

walls,

46 44

32 of faux panels, 16-17 ragging off, 59 choosing, 28-29,

Southwestern theme, 17-18

specialty,

block painting on, paint

for,

180

36

135-37 marble, 80, 124-28 panels. 16-17 rust, 156-57, 163-64 tortoiseshell, 154-55 wallpaper, 174-75 Finishes, 39 antique and specialty, 140-55 metallic, 156-67 painted, 50 stone, 124-38 textured, 74-91 for walls and floors, 70-91 See also Glazes; Varnishes Fitch, 40 Flogging, 81-83

Faux Faux Faux Faux Faux Faux

granite, 124,

29

sponging on, 63, 65 Colorwashing, 55-57 on wood, 90-91 Combing, 107-10

Contemporary style, 16-17 Country farmhouse style, 23 Crackle finish,

149-50

Ladder,

156-57

Latex paint. See Water-based paint Latex primer.

33

Linoleum floors, 46 Linseed oil, 37 Low-tack painter's tape, 43. 51. 72,

96

Mackintosh

129-31 124-28 Sienna, 132-34 Masking tape, 42. 51 Materials, 30-31 See also Brushes: specific mateCarrara,

faux, 80,

rials

cement, 46 diamond, 29, 119-20

Matte finish, 39 Metal comb. 40

72-73 47 plaid, 122-23 preparing, 45-46 terra-cotta tiles. 111-12 varnishes, 39, 50 Fresco, 84-86 Frottage, 8, 76-78

Metallic finishes,

finshes

27

style,

Magazines, 13 Marble

Floors

for,

linoleum, 46,

Color

in

Kitchens. 23

Fabric

Furniture

146-48 block painting, 180 crackle finish, 149-50 dragged. 67 milk paint, 143-45 painting tips, 49 antiquing,

156-67

143-45. 182 Moldings. 14. 15

Milk paint, 35.

Mylar stencils. 172. Off whites.

173

22

Oil-based paint.

32-34

Paint applying.

51

42-49 182 techniques. 52-69 types of. 32-36 See also Color; Primers and preparation. 30.

supplies.

priming; specific techniques

183


See Brushes 50 Painter's lights. 43 Panels. 16-17 Patterns. 92-123 checks, 102-3 combing. 107-10 diamond. 29. 119-20 stamping. 101-5 stripes, 95-100 tartan. 121-23 Plaster. 151-53 Powder paint, 34, 43 Preparation, 30, 42^49 Primers and priming. 33 floors, 46 Paintbrushes.

Painted finish.

Squeegee

99-100 92-93

stripes.

Staircases, 15,

Stamping, 101 checks. 102-3 rubber.

Protective topcoat.

50

14

105

57

Roller.

Room

painting.

49-51

Rubber comb. 40 Rubber stamping. 105 Rust. 156-57. 163-64 Safety.

42-43

Sanding

45-46 48 safety, 43 walls. 44 floors.

furniture,

Scandinavian influence. 25-26 Scrapbooks. 13 Sea sponge. 40 Semigloss finish. 39 Sheens, 39

Sheet metal, 158-59 Shellac.

33

Sideboard.

184

147

INDEX

71 160-61

Terra-cotta glazes.

Terra-cotta pot,

Stencil brush,

African safari,

Cheap and

20

Chic,

19

Country Farmhouse, 23 Eastern.

22

English country.

25

Garden Room. 26-27 Mackintosh. 27

25-26 20-22 Southwestern, 17-19 Tiles, terra-cotta, 111-12 Tools. 40-42 Topcoat, 50 Tortoiseshell, 154-55 Trunk. 121 Scandinavian,

40

Stencil paints,

35-36, 174

Stencils and stenciling. 15. 16. 87.

168-76

Shabby

Chic,

173 174-75 176 precut stencils, 172 preparation. 173-74 resources, 182 tips, 175 and varnishes, 174 Stippling brush, 40 Stone blocking. 115-17 Stone finishes, 124-38 Stripes. 95-98 ragged. 97 shadow, 97 squeegee. 99-100 taping, 96 Stripping, of furniture, 47-48 Stucco, 44, 87-88 Style. See Architectural style; Themes Surface preparation. 49 Sword liner, 40 faux wallpaper, instructions.

Rag. 40 Ragging off. 59-60 Ragging on, 61-62

14

Television,

Themes, 17-27

41 Sponging off, 66 Sponging on. 63-65 Spray paint. 34. 42

base coat for. 173 and creams or crayons. 174 designing and cutting stencils,

48 rooms, 49 walls. 45 furniture,

Public places.

Sienna marble. 132-34 Southwestern style. 17-19 Sponge sticks (sponge brushes).

and

stenciling,

Varnishing brush, Verdigris,

Victorian

160-61 homes, 14-15

44-45 174-75

Wallpaper. 15. faux,

Walls

colorwashed, 55-57 dragged. 67

70-91 44-45 ragging off. 59-60 varnishes. 38, 50

finishes.

preparing,

in

Victorian

homes, 14

Water-based glazes, 71-72 Water-based paint, 11, 32. 33

Weathered

finish.

160-61

Wet edge. 72

Wood 146-48 90-91 milk paint. 143-45 Workshops, 13 antiquing.

140-41 Tape. 42. 43. 51 Tartan. 121-23 Table.

50 174 40

Varnishes, 38-39.

colorwashing.


a

k M m

m


T

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* «

yy

y

BQDD

d

2b

J


(continued from front flap)

unique paint effects, and a complete source

Debbie

list,

House enables

Travis' Painted

you to (almost) effortlessly achieve today's

most sought-after decorative DEBBIE TRAVIS

an internationally acclaimed

is

whose home

painted-finishes expert

Debbie

ing show,

Travis' Painted

rently airs in

more than

fifty

the

including

the

world,

Canada, Great

looks.

decorat-

House,

cur-

countries across

United

Japan, Sin-

Britain, Italy, China,

gapore, and the Netherlands.

In

States,

addition, her

best-selling how-to decorative

paint videos

and

in

stencil

home nally

kits

are available

decorating centers nationwide.

from

Canada

Debbie

England,

with her

BARBARA DINGLE has sively for the design fifteen years.

now

husband and two

written

and

craft

Origi-

lives

children.

and edited exten-

and decorating market

She shares

painted finishes, and

in

Travis'

when not

for

passion for

writing

them can be found transforming her own

about walls

"with a bit of paint."

Author photograph by BRIGITTE Jacket photograph by

BRUYEZ

RICHARD POISSANT

Jacket design by LISA

GOLDENBERG

Clarkson Potter/Publishers

New York 11/97 www.randomhouse.com

ISBN 0-609-60155-5 60 155 I

il

iiiiiiiiii

02995


"This

book

is

the guide

—with

painting

I

wish

I'd

had when

I

lots of pictures to inspire you,

first

started decorative

and clear step-by-step

instructions to guide you through each painted finish. I've

how simple

selected demonstrate beautifully

can transform plain walls,

floors,

and

furniture.

.

.

.The

rooms

paint effects .1

honestly believe

that once you learn the basic rules for making a glaze and begin to manipulate

and play with paint

very rewarding."

all

—and

the finishes are easy

—from the Preface by Debbie Travis

ISBN 0-609-60155-5

52995 I

ill 111 9

7806 09"6015 56

111

Dt painted house  
Dt painted house  
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