Issuu on Google+

es

Or

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

oo

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use By the pool Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines easily decodable words with a few essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for By the pool is the vowel phoneme oo.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Focus on the ‘oo’ sound, and emphasise it in words as you read the story together.

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. Focus on some of the shorter ‘oo’ vowel words and break the words into separate sounds. Then blend them together again to say the word (zoo, cool, pool, soon, hoot, fool, food). Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar.

Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


Zig Zag Zebra sat in the zoo. She sat in the cool and looked at all the people who came to the zoo. 2


There was a boy with balloons, and a lot of children from the school. 3


Zig Zag Zebra sat in the sun all afternoon. She soon began to droop. She soon began to snooze. 4


Letterland Vowel Readers Letterland Vowel Readers are available in three sets. Red Series focuses on the short vowels sounds in decodable text. Blue Series features short vowel sounds in more complex sentences with a few more high-frequency words. Orange Series features long vowels and vowel digraphs. Red Series

a

e

i

o

u

a, o

e

e, i

e, o, u

i, a

o, u

i-e, ie

oo

u-e,ue, ew, oo

Blue Series

Orange Series

a-e, e-e, i-e, o-e, u-e

ea, ee

ee, ea, ai, ay, oa

Published 2007 by Letterland International Ltd Barton, Cambridge, CB23 7AY, UK Tel: Email: Web:

+44 (0)1223 262 675 info@letterland.com www.letterland.com

© Letterland International Ltd 2007 First published 2000. Revised edition published 2007. Reprinted 2009. ISBN: 978-1-86209-416-1 Product Code: TA12 2 4 6 8 10 9 7 5 3 LETTERLAND® is a registered trademark of Lyn Wendon Printed in Singapore

Written by Katie Carr Illustrated by Anna Jupp Edited & Designed by Lisa Holt Consultant: Lyn Wendon, originator of Letterland All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without either the prior permission of the Publisher or a licence permitting restricted copying in the United Kingdom issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency Ltd, 90 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 4LP. This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not by way of trade or otherwise be lent, hired out or otherwise circulated without the Publisher’s prior consent. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data. A Catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library


Or

es

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

ee, ea, ai,ay,oa

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use Greedy seagulls! Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines decodable words with a few essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for Greedy seagulls! is the vowel digraphs ee, ea, ai, ay, oa.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Choose a phoneme to focus on and emphasise it in words as you read the story together.

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. When focusing on a particular vowel phoneme, break a word up into separate sounds, then blend the sounds together again e.g. s-ea, b-ea-ch, r-ea-ch. Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar like ‘groaned’ or ‘boasted’.

Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


Mike got a letter from Sammy one day, asking him to come and stay. 2


So Mike jumped on a train to the sea, and Sammy met him just before three. 3


“What’s up?” asked Mike. “Will you explain.” Said Sammy, “It’s these seagulls again!” 4


“The greedy seagulls scream and screech, and they steal our picnics from the beach.” 5


Or

es

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

a-e,e-e, i-e, o-e,u-e

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use In the lighthouse Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines decodable words with essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for In the lighthouse is the long vowel phonemes a-e, e-e, i-e, o-e and u-e.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Choose a long vowel phoneme, for example the ‘i-e’ sound, and emphasise it in words as you read the story out loud together. (nice, inside, decide, arrive, surprise, shine, five).

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. You might want to review the Magic e concept. (See Letterland Teacher’s Guide for details.)

Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar. Look at the pictures to see if you can find any new vocabulary, like ‘lighthouse’ or ‘fuse’.

Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


It was a nice evening so Lucy Lamp Light and Clever Cat decided to go for a walk. 2


Lucy ...?

While they were out, Eddy Elephant arrived at Lucy’s lighthouse. He wanted to see Lucy. He knocked. He pushed the door. Then he decided to go inside. 3


Eddy Elephant went up to the top of the lighthouse. Then he saw the huge light. He saw it shine across the sea keeping the ships and boats safe. 4


He saw all the buttons. But then Eddy bumped into one of them by mistake. “Oh, no!” he cried. “The light has gone out. Help!” 5


Or

es

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

u-e,ue, ew, oo

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use New jeans Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines easily decodable words with a few essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for New jeans is the vowel phonemes u - e , ue, ew and oo.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Focus on the long ‘u’ sound, and emphasise it in words as you read the story together.

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. When focusing on a particular vowel phoneme, break a word up into separate sounds, then blend the sounds together again e.g. gl-ue, bl-ue, tr-ue. Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar. Look at the pictures to see if you can find new vocabulary and topics to talk about, such as rockets and space travel.

Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


One Tuesday afternoon, Max went to Nick’s house to play. Nick had on his new blue jeans. 2


Nick and Max went up to Nick’s room. “What do you want to do?” asked Nick. “You choose.” 3


First they drew some little pictures. Then they drew a huge picture of a rocket zooming into space. 4


“Now let’s make a rocket!” said Max. “I’ve got lots of boxes and tubes we can use and a new pot of glue,” said Nick. 5


es

Or

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

i-e, ie

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use No socks! Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines easily decodable words with a few essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for No socks! is the vowel phonemes i-e and ie.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Focus on the ‘ie’ and ‘i-e’ sound, and emphasise the sound in words as you read the story together.

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. When focusing on a particular vowel phoneme, break a word up into separate sounds, then blend the sounds together again e.g. t-ie, l-ie, cr-ie-d. Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar. Look at the pictures to see if you can find any new vocabulary, such as Nick’s newts and aquarium. Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


It was the day of the school football match. Noisy Nick was playing for the green side. 2


Nick was looking for his green and white football socks. He looked in his bag. No socks! 3


Nick ran outside and looked on the washing line. No green and white socks! 4


Yap! Yap!

While Nick was outside he looked in the bag on his bike. No socks! 5


es

Or

ge Seri an

Vowel focus

ea, ee

For guided a nd sh ared rea ding


How to use The Queen’s treat Letterland Vowel Readers - Orange Series combines easily decodable words with a few essential high-frequency words. The phonic focus for The Queen’s treat are the vowel phonemes ea, ee.

Step 1 - You may like to read the story out loud first. If a child lacks confidence it will help to become familiar with the contents of the story before they try to read any of the words themselves.

Step 2 - Phonemic Awareness - Awareness that the words we speak and hear are made up of smaller units of sounds is a key skill for beginner readers. Focus on the ‘ee’ and ‘ea’ sound, and emphasise it in words as you read the story together.

Step 3 - Phonics - Children need to begin to decode words, developing knowledge of phonics, syllables, and word parts. When focusing on a particular vowel phoneme, break a word up into separate sounds, then blend the sounds together again e.g. m-ee-t, w-ee-d, tr-ee. Step 4 - Vocabulary - Acquiring and using new vocabulary is a vital skill in learning to read. Talk about any words that might not be familiar. Look at the pictures to help describe new words like ‘bleak’ or ‘gleaming’.

Step 5 - Fluency - Reading fluently is a skill which can be achieved through familiarity with text. Come back to the stories in this series later, with the new purpose of reading them with expression and flow. Note any difficult spots and practise them. Then re-read the pages one more time. The more expression the better!

Step 6 - Comprehension - Children can be too busy decoding the words to fully understand what they are reading. Talk about the story and ask questions. Encourage them to retell the story in their own words.

It’s

an more impor tant than ything...

e to

njoy readin kt g the boo ogether!


It had been a long, bleak winter, with a cold east wind and freezing sleet. Quarrelsome Queen was not feeling pleased. 2


She went to speak to Kicking King. “I feel sad. I need a treat!” she said. Kicking King agreed with her. “I think we could all do with a treat.” 3


“Let’s have a big feast!” said Kicking King. “But I don’t like feasts!” said Quarrelsome Queen. “If we have a feast, I will eat too much and then I will feel ill.” 4


Kicking King went to speak to Clever Cat. “I need to think of a treat for the Queen,” he said. “It must not be a feast. What can it be?” 5


Vowel Readers Orange Series