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Teacher’s Guide Step-by-Step GRADE TWO Volume 1 Units 1 – 20

Volume 1


R

What is Letterland? Explain Letterland to your children along the following lines… When most people look inside a book, all they see are plain, black letters. That’s because they haven’t been to Letterland and they don’t know that every letter is really one of our Letterland friends. Letterland is the secret place where all the letters live together. The friendly letter people and animals who live there are called the “Letterlanders.” Every Letterlander has a special sound, and they love it when we make their sound. Did you know that they have made up a special trick just to help you learn all their letter sounds? They also have all sorts of other tricks to help everyone learn to read and write. Would you like to go to Letterland and meet some of the Letterlanders? To make the imaginative journey to Letterland, you could sing the Letterland Song together, jump into a giant book, pretend to fly, or simply close your eyes and open them again in Letterland, ready to meet a new Letterlander.


Contents Contents Introduction Letterland Across the Years……………………………………………………………………...…………………6 Important features of this Teachers Guide……………………………………………………...………… 7 Grade Two Scope and Sequence……………………………………………………………………...…………8 Leterland materials you will need…………………………………………………………………………………10 Road Map for a Five Day Unit…………………………………………………………………...…………………12 Unit Resources for students from the Teacher’s Guide CD…………………………………………. 14 Building on prior Letterland teaching……………………………………………………………...……………15 The Six Syllable Types……………………………………………………………...………………………………… 16 Letterland learning strategies at a glance……………………………………………………………...……18 Picture Coding and Quick Coding……………………………………………………………...…………………20 Getting started with your students……………………………………………………………...………………22

Unit Activities Five Day Unit Plan – overview……………………………………………………………...………………………24 Step‐by Step Weekly Activities……………………………………………………………...…………………… 25 Homework Activities……………………………………………………………...……………………………………51 Comprehension Activities……………………………………………………………...……………………………53 Preparing Children for Independent/Partner Activities…………………………………………………54 Multi‐sensory Strategies for Blending & Segmenting……………………………………………………55 Game of the Week……………………………………………………………...………………………………………59

Step‐by‐Step Unit Plans UNIT A: Getting to Know the Letterlanders Short vowels a, e, i, o, u……………………………62 UNIT 1: Closed and Open Syllables  e, o……………………………………………………………...………68 UNIT 2: Closed and Open Syllables  a, i, u……………………………………………………………...……75 UNIT 3: More Review ng, ing, ll, ff, ss……………………………………………………………...………… 80 UNIT 4: Mr. I and Mr. O with Magic e, a, a_e, i_e…………………………………………………………86 UNIT 5: Mr. A, Mr. I, Mr. O with Magic e, a_e, i‐e, o_e and ce…………………………………… 92 UNIT 6: Gentle Ginger a& Dippy Duck, u_e, ge, silent d in dge…………………………………… 96 UNIT 7: Three Sounds of ‐ed: /ed/, /d/ and /t/……………………………………………………………100 UNIT 8: Talking Tess and the Sneeze tch, ‐cket……………………………………………………………104 UNIT 9: Vowel Men Out Walking ee, ea……………………………………………………………...………108 UNIT 10: More Vowel Men Out Walking ai, ay, oa and ow………………………………………… 113 UNIT 11: Silent Letters: kn, wr, mb, igh……………………………………………………………...………117 UNIT 12: The Robot Syllable with Arthur Ar and Orvil Or…………………………………………… 121 UNIT 13: Robot Syllable: ir/ur Brothers……………………………………………………………...………125 UNIT 14: Ernest Er and Bothersome Baby Brother……………………………………………………… 129 UNIT 15: Robots Race while Yo‐yo Man Works for Mr. E and Mr. I………………………………134 UNIT 16: The Boot Twin……………………………………………………………...………………………………138 UNIT 17: Ew, ue, and oo in foot……………………………………………………………...……………………142 UNIT 18: Eddy Elephant Does the Talking……………………………………………………………...……146 UNIT 19: Inflections: s, es, y to ies……………………………………………………………...………………150 UNIT 20: More from the trouble‐maker: ow and ou……………………………………………………154

Assessment………………………………………………………………………...……………158 Appendix………………………………………………………………………...……………… 168 List of CD Contents……………………………………………………………...……………177


Letterland across the years… Initial Sound Awareness

PRESCHOOL /b/

b

I’m Bouncy Ben.

Capital

Sound

Character

Handwriting

Reading Direction Basic Phonic Patterns

KINDERGARTEN /sss/ /ĭĭĭ/ /p/

Blending Segmenting

Phonemic Awareness Fast Track

Stories Decodable Booklets Word Sorting

GRADE ONE More Phonic Patterns

they

said

Stories for Fluency

what

Irregular Sight Words

GRADE TWO Advanced Phonic Patterns

Syllable Types Syllable Division

Spelling Spelling Changes Changes

6

Readers Theater Plays


Important Features of this Teacher’s Guide Systematic, synthetic phonic emphasis for daily support of literacy learning Word structure teaching includes syllable types, syllable division, prefixes and suffixes Scientific research-based instruction that is exceptionally child-friendly Multi-sensory methods for reading and spelling Interactive strategies to engage children’s attention and accelerate learning Emphasis on fluency at all levels: letter sounds, words, sentences, and stories Comprehension taught though dramatic readings, discussion, and questioning Teacher’s Guide •

42 weekly Units of instruction – choose Units to match your curriculum and student needs

Each Unit teaches new phonic elements or syllable types with appealing Letterland characters and memorable story logic

Daily activities for whole class, small group, independent/partner practice, and homework

Reproducible Resources on the accompanying CD •

Student pages for each Unit: Student List, Word Sort, Review Sentences, Word Detectives

A decodable Readers Theater play for each of the 42 units to practice current concepts, review previous learning, and build fluency, expression and comprehension

Teaching posters to provide strong visual support as new concepts are introduced

3 games practicing word recognition and new concepts for use with various Units

Quick-reference Daily Guide Cards for teachers

Assessment and Intervention •

Designed to be compatible with the Response to Intervention model (RTI)

Special Intervention Section for Tier Two or Three instruction

Optional Placement Assessment to match instruction to student needs

Weekly Unit fluency and spelling assessments for instructional decision making

Tri-weekly fluency and spelling assessments for monitoring progress and learning retention Important Note on Styles and Abbreviations Throughout this Teacher’s Guide, you will see words that the teacher might say to the children printed in blue without quotation marks. This text is meant to provide guidelines and does not need to be read word for word. Words that the children might say are printed with quotation marks in “black bold.” Words or letters that may be used in an activity or an explanation are also printed in bold. Abbreviations have been kept to a minimum but these are used frequently: PCCs: Picture Code Cards TG CD: Teacher’s Guide Compact Disk

7


Grade Two Scope and Sequence Section Getting To Know the Letterlanders Short Vowels, Blends & Digraphs, Open & Closed

Unit No.

Letterland alphabet. Short vowel/ single consonant words (cvc)

wag met zip fox dug

they are

1

Closed syllables & Open syllables with long & short vowels e and o. Digraphs sh, ck. Initial and final blends with l. Final st

so sock she shelf

where when what

2

Vowels a, i, u. Digraphs ch, th, th. flu thin that chin music Initial blends with s. Open and minus robot Closed syllables in 2-syllable words

3

Digraph ng. Final consonant blends nk, nd, nt. Suffix ing. Final ll, ss, ff

pond must standing bring their water wash bunk next shell floss stiff

4

Long ā and ī with Magic e: a-e, i-e Silent w in wr

brave slide write trade invite

quiet everyone

5

Long ō with Magic e: o-e, ā and īwith soft c: ce

globe trace slice advice

ahead ready

6

Long ū with Magic e: u-e Soft ge, dge

cube stage bridge refuse

change word

7

Suffix ed with 3 sounds: /ed/ /d/ /t/. skated spilled thanked Magic e with ed

heard young

8

tch, cket

match kitchen ticket

always watch almost

9

ee, ea/ē/

least breeze agree really agree

great because

10

ai, ay, oa, ow, kn

afraid tray know explain

once straight

11

Silent letters: igh, wr, mb, kn

bright limb wrote knife

people climb

12

or, ar

born forty barn alarm

animal picture

13

ir, ur

third Thursday birthday

thought around

14

o/ŭ/, er, or/er/

wonder above color

family father

Suffix ed & more

Vowel Men Out Walking & more

The Vowel Stealers

Y as a Vowel and Racing Robots

Tricky Words

A

Syllables

Magic e syllables, Soft c & g

Sample Decodable Words

Skill

15

try reply sorry errand y /ī/, y/ē/, rr after short vowels (i.e. sleep hungry carry, berry)

8

who does

laugh whole bury


Section Variant Vowel Pairs, Diphthongs, and Suffix es

e More Vowel Stealers

Prefixes and Variant Plurals

Consonant Doubling

p

p

Contractions Multi-syllable Words, Syllable Division

Unit No.

Sample Decodable Words

Tricky Words

16

oo /oo/ as in boot, o/oo/ as in do smooth balloon who prove

children

17

ew, ue, /oo/ as in foot

rescue threw stood football

shoes through

18

ea/ě/

bread ready instead

enough care

19

suffixes es, y to i plus es, s after silent e

babies tries inches dresses places bridges

answer finally

20

ou, ow

proud cloudy clown flower

built build idea

21

oi, oy

annoy enjoy coin moist

length warn

22

aw, au

August because crawl

young

23

ore, oor, our

score floor fourteen

touch

24

air, are

stair repair scare beware

25

ear, eer

nearly hearing cheerful

several

26

Prefixes: dis, un, re, pre

unfair rewrite disagree preschool

twelve

27

Variant plurals (men, loaves)

teeth leaves feet halves

woman women

28

-ing with consonant doubling

29

-ed with consonant doubling

30

-er, -est with consonant doubling

biggest wider hotter loudest

either

31

Contractions

they’ve couldn’t where’s

been hour

32

Syllable Division: Closed

contest insect admit cactus

guest

33

Closed syllables with schwa

husband collect kingdom distant

upon guard

34

Multi-syllable words: Open

silent pilot basic local

usual

35

Open and closed, with doubling

beyond happen final traffic

minute

36

Open and closed (vcv)

raven camel total closet

neither weird

37

Multi-syllable words: Magic e

38 39 40 New Patterns

Skill

Mutli-syllable words: R-controlled vowels Multi-syllable words: Vowel Teams Multi-syllable words: Consonant-le; cy

hoping tapping jumping swimming dropped floated tagged stayed

sure extra shall

complete basement remote confuse paper surprise garden chapter easel power certain table recycle puzzle able

ocean special

41

ph, gh/f/, silent gh

graph photo cough thought

42

tion, ture

nation picture fiction nature

9


Letterland Materials You Will Need Teacher’s Guides 1 and 2 with Resource CDs Complete support for building strong word recognition and spelling with child-friendly research-based lessons. Fluent reading emphasis at all levels: letter sounds, syllables, words, sentences, and stories. CDs provide reproducible pages for each Unit, posters, assessments and other valuable resources.

4

quiet quiet invite

quiet

4

4

4 TW

4 TW

everyone

Large Word Cards Decodable words and Tricky Words for each Unit on cards large enough for whole class work on your pocket chart. Used for word sorting and reading practice.

4

grape shine 4

4

mistake smile

4

inside

Small Word Cards Same words as large cards. Just right

for small group work. Ideal for intervention groups.

4

Picture Code Cards With all single consonants, vowels and many digraphs and vowel patterns, you can use these cards for letter sound practice and for building words. Picture-coded Letterlanders on one side and plain letters on the back, plus a brief note for teachers providing the story logic and example words in small print. Also available in a pre-cursive font.

d

qu Advanced Picture Code Cards Learning these more challenging phonic patterns will turn your children into more confident readers and spellers.

10


Beyond ABC Why does a-w make that aw sound? Normally there is no child-friendly reason, so Letterland provides one that becomes an easy recall route. The aw story in brief: Mischievous Walter Walrus splashes Annie Apple with cold salty water so she cries, “Aw, Walter, don’t be so awful!” Share the full story accompanying each illustration. Let the children listen for the target sound recurring in it and enjoy searching for objects in the picture containing that sound. (For more on the two new companion volumes Beyond ABC and Far Beyond ABC see the Appendix.) Blends and Digraphs Songs CD and Advanced Songs CD These memorable songs help children enjoy learning through these tunes and rhymes about the complex relationships between letters and sounds. Lyrics for printing or projection are included in your Teacher’s Guide CD. Use them for shared reading/singing and for hunting for the phonic patterns being learned. Syllable Types Poster Illustrated Letterland story logic

for the Six Syllable Types. Recognizing the syllable type enables children to predict the correct vowel sound to help read just about any word, no matter how many syllables. Vowel Scene Posters These four scenes explain major vowel groups to post in your classroom. Children will refer to these intriguing posters again and again.

Other helpful materials Alphabet Poster Magnetic Word Builder

Vowel Readers Orange Series

Living Code Cards Software

11


Road Map for a Five Day Unit The pocket chart shows how Picture Code Cards and Word Cards are sorted in the Unit.

The Unit Focus summarizes the concepts to be learned and provides other essential information for the teacher.

Children learn List A for a week. If they need more practice they work on List B. When they have mastered Unit 9, they move on to Unit 10.

Include Diagnostic Words in the weekly assessment of spelling and reading fluency, to check for transfer of word knowledge to words not on the list.

Story Words are challenging words from the Readers Theater play for each Unit.

Review Words from previous Units help with learning, consolidation and retention.

Picture Code Cards are systematically reviewed to build accurate decoding and automaticity in word reading.

Day 1 New concepts and Live Reading

Each Unit includes 1 to 4 Tricky Words, irregular high-frequency words, that are practiced in each lesson.

Day 3 Word sorting and Reader’s Theater

Day 4 Reading Fluency and Word Games

Day 2 Live Spelling and Word Detectives

12

New Spelling Sentences provide practice with new decodable words and Tricky Words.

Day 5 Assessment: Spelling and Fluency


List of preparations and items needed for your lessons.

Lively, memorable Day 1 lesson with the Letterlanders and their story logic.

With Live Reading and Spelling children become the Letterlanders and classmates read and spell words for one another.

Helpful illustrations for word building and additional materials.

Children identify the syllable type, predict the vowel sound, and then reveal the Letterlanders to check their prediction.

Days 3-5 outlined in each Unit, with specific steps for each activity provided on handy Daily Guide Cards printed out from the accompanying TG CD.

13


Unit Resources for Students from the Teacher’s Guide CD Word Detectives

Student List

Written Word Sort

Decodable Readers Theater Play Review Sentences

14


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The Six Types of As both teachers and learners know, English vowel spellings and sounds can be very tricky. Learning about the six syllable types will help your children anticipate just what the vowels will say in most words. It will also help them read and spell longer words by recognizing that they can break them into smaller chunks and apply all they have learned about phonics up to now. In Letterland each syllable is a train car carrying Letterlanders. The train cars link up to make a word with the locomotive for prefixes and the caboose for suffixes. The order of the vowels and consonants in each train car help children identify the syllable type and the sound of the vowel.

Open Syllable A Vowel Man likes to shout his name in the Reading Direction into the open air when he doesn’t have to worry about shouting in anyone else’s ear. Traditional rule: In a syllable with one vowel that is at the end, the vowel will usually have the long vowel sound.

wē o

sō o

tūlip o

sīlent o

Closed Syllable A Vowel Sound feels safe in saying his or her usual sound when there is a friendly consonant or two after to close off any Vowel Stealing Robots from moving in. Traditional rule: In a syllable with one vowel with at least one consonant after it, the vowel sound is usually short.

Magic e Syllable

c c

ŭp c

shĕll c

băsket c

c

c

c

cŏntĕst

tīme e

Magic e is the letter you cannot hear with the power to make the Vowel Man appear! Its magic sparks shoot back over one letter to land on the Vowel Man who calls out his name. Traditional rule: When a vowel is followed by a consonant followed by an e on the end of a word or syllable, the first vowel says its long sound.

16

rōse e

mistāke c

e

līvely e


Letterland Learning Strategies at a Glance Letter Sounds

“Vicky Violet”

Quick Dash Children practice letter sounds with the Picture Code Cards. At first show them the picture side of just recently introduced cards and have them tell the story logic that explains the new sound. Then build fluency by quickly running through just the plain letter sides as the children respond as fast as they can with the sounds.

/v v v /

th e Guess Who? In this activity, you begin with the Picture Code Cards hidden. You say the sound, children repeat it, and then they respond either orally or in writing with all the ways they have learned to spell the sound. Then you show them the picture-sides to confirm their answer.

Word Building Live Reading and Spelling In Live Reading children ‘become’ the Letterlanders and form words that their classmates read. In Live Spelling children hear the word first and repeat it. They orally segment it and decide which ‘children as Letterlanders’ need to go into the word. They read their word to check its spelling.

sh

n sh

n

On the Pocket Chart Build words with Picture Code Cards to teach new phonic and word structure concepts. Children help manipulate the cards and use multisensory techniques while you direct their blending of sounds and understanding of syllables and syllable division.

Children Build Words Children regularly practice multi-sensory syllable and phoneme segmentation and spell new and review words using their own set of magnetic letters. Mistakes create teaching opportunities and the children easily correct their errors.

18


I am Mr. E and I say my name, but my friend Mr. A won’t do the same in words like “east.”

tree

Word Sorting Live Word Sort Children deliver Word Cards to other children playing the role of Letterlanders with Picture Code Cards. Then, as in the illustration, one partner tells about the sound and the other shows the Word Cards one at a time while the class reads them.

Word Sort on the Pocket Chart When a child places a Word Card correctly on the pocket chart, he or she then gets to lead the class in reading all the words in the column. Providing the child with a special pointer makes this more appealing. Then children can practice reading the words with increasing speed as you all pretend to be ‘Tractors, Trains, Planes, and Helicopters’

Written Word Sort Children use their word list and decide where to write the word to match with the Letterlanders. For more challenge later in the week, you call out the words. They choose the column and spell the words on their own.

Fluent Reading and Comprehension Word Level Children practice reading the decodable words for the week in a number of activities including the Game of the Week. They also work toward automatic recognition of irregular, high-frequency Tricky Words (often called sight words). They practice reading the Student List with Red Robot’s Reading Race and then graph their own reading rate progress on their Robot Racers chart. Sentence Level Children read and write Review Sentences and New Sentences and work on sentence comprehension and expressive reading. Story Level With each Unit, children listen to and then read a new Readers Theater play, many of them starring the delightful Letterland characters. Rereading these engaging stories for fluency is a treat, not a chore, as children try out different characters and strive for meaningful expression. ‘Story Stone’ and ‘Story Mapping’ activities as well as questioning and discussion help build comprehension

19


Picture Coding children write them. Then with a model to look at such as the Picture Code Cards, the Beyond ABC books, or class posters, children illustrate the Letterlanders and the story logic that explains the sound.

In earlier levels of Letterland teaching, children picture code the individual Letterlanders (e.g. Dippy Duck and Oscar Orange) to help them learn the shapes and sounds. At the current level, when children learn about a new phonic combination, they draw the Letterland characters over plain letters, thereby making the concept their own. You can provide them with the plain letters or have

You can also have children picture code whole words as shown below (suggested for Unit words on Day 5 of each week).

Quick Coding Sounds and Patterns are introduced. All the quick coding marks are shown below and on the Quick Coding Poster (made by assembling its eight panels, see TG CD). The sequence for making the various code marks is based on the sequence children normally follow to read an unknown word. That sequence is set out on page 36 and also on your Daily Guide Cards.

Quick Coding is a more advanced form of coding that enables children to practice and demonstrate their understanding of phonic elements, syllables, prefixes, and suffixes with a few quick marks. Quick coding is included among several weekly activities detailed as part of the Five Day Plan which begins on page 24. Children learn the markings gradually as new concepts

Quick Coding Symbols Vowel Sounds Many children can be confused by the terms ‘short and long vowels.’ So in Letterland teaching the short sounds (symbolized by Annie Apple, Eddy Elephant, Impy Ink, Oscar Orange and Uppy Umbrella) are simply called the Vowel Sounds. These single short vowels are by far the most common vowel sounds in our language, making this an appropriate label. Because they are all friendly, happy Letterlanders their sounds are quick-coded with a ‘smile’ (traditionally called a breve).

mat

red

win

hop

bud 20


Vowel Men The five Vowel Men symbolize the long vowels. They are the only Letterlanders who say their alphabet names in words. Traditionally called ‘long vowel sounds’, in Letterland teaching to avoid confusion they are called ‘the Vowel Men’s Names’, or simply the Vowel Names. That is why Mr. A, Mr. E, Mr. I, Mr. O, and Mr. U are quick-coded above their letter with a straight line, ‘a place to sign their names.’

apron

we

hi

go

flu

         

Consonant Digraphs Digraphs are two letters that make only one sound. (Pairs of vowels are sometimes called digraphs as well, but in Letterland teaching to avoid confusion these digraphs are called Vowel Teams, see below.) Each consonant digraph has its own story logic that explains the sound, but all of the digraphs are quick-coded by boxing the two letters together to remind children that they only stand for one sound. If one of the letters in the digraph makes its usual sound and the other is silent, a backslash through the silent one shows that in this case it has no sound (e.g. k in the /n/ sound of kn).

chin

luck

sing

graph

f

cuff

laugh ought knot

ship

thin

that

fill

wrap

comb where

who

Silent Magic e To quick-code words with Magic e, draw an arrow for the magic sparks curving back over one letter to land on the vowel. Then mark a straight line over the Vowel Man as a place for him ‘to sign his name’. A backslash through the Magic e shows it is silent.

lake

these

side

home

tune

Vowel Teams A Vowel Team is two or more letters that make one vowel sound. In quite a lot of these phonemes the first Vowel Man says his name while the second one is silent (Vowels Out Walking). Show this with a straight line over the first vowel and a backslash through the second. When Walter Walrus appears beside a vowel he changes the sound with his mischieveous splashing, whether from his water wells (e.g. aw, ew, ow) or when he sneaks into a u and fills it with more water to splash with (e.g. au, ou). So draw a water droplet around these letters to show that together they make only one sound. To quickcode words with other teams see the other markings shown below.

rain

stay

head

tree

boot

real

foot

tie

point

coat boy

low saw

true

night

cause few

sound now Vowel Stealers To show that a robot has captured a vowel and is saying his own last name, draw his robber sack around the vowel (or two vowels). Robots also capture two vowels, causing new sounds.

far winter fair care

stir fork turn ear bear

door

m o re

four

Prefixes and Suffixes To help decode and understand words children need to recognize prefixes and suffixes. Circling prefixes and suffixes helps clarify the baseword.

preheat

dislike

unwrap

lunches

ending

added

neatest

grateful

lovely

ed

21

refill

bikes d

roamed

rugs

taped

t

z

softer


Getting Started with Your Students These two pages provide suggestions for beginning to use Letterland Step-byStep in your classroom. From getting acquainted with your Teacher’s Guide and preparing materials to assessing and placing your children, these steps will help you have a successful start in your Letterland teaching. Your Teacher’s Guide To get an overview of Letterland teaching at this level go to pages 3-19 for a wealth of information. For the specifics on daily teaching activities, you may want to read over pages 22-62. As you read these pages you may want to also refer to pages 68-74 to see how the activities are applied in Unit 1. Flexibility and Creativity in Teaching This Teacher’s Guide provides a wide range of activities to facilitate your teaching of reading and spelling. As a knowledgeable teacher, you may want to choose to do all the activities or just those that meet the needs of your children. Letterland’s characters and story logic tends to bring out creativity in children and teachers alike. We hope you will feel free to follow that creativity wherever it leads to more good teaching. Flexibility in Sequence While the Units in this guide have a logical sequence and do build on each other, you may want to follow a different sequence that corresponds to other reading programs or to your school or district curriculum. You can follow that other sequence using these Units as long as you keep in mind that the Review List words in the Unit may not fit with your teaching order. You could possibly provide children with a different review list. Preparing your classroom Pocket Charts Having two pocket charts will help you manage Picture Code Cards (PCCs) and Word Cards effectively. As shown, keeping the single letter PCCs a-z in alphabetical order on one pocket chart will facilitate word building activities such as Live Reading. Place alternative sounds for the same letter behind the most common letter (e.g. Eddy Elephant in front, with Mr. E and Magic e behind). Leave room at the top to build words, and at the bottom for other PCCs that are needed for the Unit of the week. Your pocket chart will work best with the PCCs if it is placed at a slight slant on an easel or firmly fastened to a wall. (Letterland does not currently sell Pocket Charts.) 4 TW4 TW 4 TW

quiet quiet quiet

4

mistake smile

inside

4

4

Word Cards The other pocket chart is for Word Cards for the Unit of the week with the featured PCCs at the top. Word Cards will need to be cut-out and, if you prefer, laminated. You could get all the Units ready as the year begins or simply prepare the words for each Unit as you need them. Posters Displaying the Letterland teaching posters where children can refer to them as they read and write will help them apply the concepts you teach in your lessons. Posters that will be helpful include the Vowel Scene Posters and the Syllable Poster (shown on page 11). The Quick Coding poster (at the left) is on the CD that accompanies this Teacher’s Guide (TG CD). You could begin the year with the first four pages displayed on your classroom wall. Then add the other four pages when you need them as you progress through the Units. Daily Guide Cards Print these cards from the TG CD on heavy paper. Then cut them horizontally across and place them on a ring to use for quick prompts as you teach. They provide details in outline for the activities in the Five Day Plan.

22


Starting point for children There are two options to choose from to begin teaching. Read below and choose the one that meets the needs of your children. Getting to Know the Letterlanders (pages 62-67) This teaching Unit is helpful for children who are new to Letterland. With it you can… • Teach the 26 basic letter sounds quickly with the help of the Letterland characters. • Reviews three letter words with all five short vowels. • Teach the routines of the same Five Day Plan as other Units. (Save consonant digraphs and blends to teach in the Unit 1.) Whether all your children or just a few are new to Letterland, you may want to use this whole Unit or just use parts for a few days to get children accustomed to the activities and the Letterland teaching style. Unit 1: Closed and Open Syllables (pages 68-74) This Unit is intended for children who have been taught with Letterland at previous levels or who have completed the ‘Getting to Know the Letterlanders’ described above. With this Unit you can… • Review short and long vowel sounds for e and o. • Reintroduce digraphs sh, ck and consonant blends with l. • Teach children to orally count syllables in words. • Introduce Closed and Open Syllables in one syllable words. • Teach children to anticipate the vowel sound based on syllable type. Differentiation and Grouping Many teachers find that it works well to have all children in the class in the same Unit for the first few weeks of school. Once children know the classroom routines better and you know more about the children, you may see the need for some children to keep moving ahead and some to review for a longer time or even to learn from Units in the previous level of Letterland Step-by-Step. The Placement Assessment can be administered to children during the first few weeks of school to help you make decisions about individuals and groups of children. For a full discussion of differentiation and grouping see the Assessment section. Copies for your students For each Unit there are six documents on the TG CD that you can copy and give to your students. Samples of these are pictured on page 14. They can also be projected. Some teachers like to make booklets of items 1-5 below for several Units at a time for each child. Other teachers give children single documents as needed. If copying is limited in your school, please note the suggestions below for how to avoid making copies of some of these pages. Document 1. Student List 2. Word Detectives 3. Review Sentences 4. Unit Story 5. Word Sort

Pages 1

1 1 2-4 1

Purpose Children read words for fluency and reference for homework and other activities

Copy Saving Tips Each child will need their own copy of this one.

Children find and quick-code words from the Unit. Children read to practice words learned previously; also use for dictation. Children read aloud. Children write words in columns under Letterland pictograms.

Project or write these two sentences on the board for children to copy and quick-code. Project or, if used in small group, only a few copies are needed. If used in small group, only a few are needed. Show children how to fold their papers to make columns. Children picture code the letters at the top.

23


Five Day Unit Plan

Overview of Day 3 Whole Class

Each Unit follows the same Five Day plan. The page number after each item below leads you to instructions on using the activity with your children and an explanation of the purpose. You may also want to print out the Daily Guide Cards on the Teacher’s Guide CD.

• Guess Who? p 38-39 • Sorting Word Cards, p 39-41 • Read the Unit Story to the children, p 41-42 Small Group • Dictate Tricky Words, p 42 • Dictate 1 or 2 Review Sentences, p 42

Overview of Day 1

• Children read the Unit Story, p 43

Whole Class

Independent/Partner

• Phonic concept review, p 25

• Written Word Sort, p 43

• Introduce new concepts on the pocket chart, p 25-27

• Children write words on Game page, p 44

• Beyond ABC book (for some lessons) • Live Reading, p 27-28

Overview of Day 4

• Read the new words on Word Cards, p 28-29

Whole Class • Quick Dash, p 45

Small Group

• Red Robot’s Reading Race, p 45

• Teacher builds words for reading, p 29

• Play the Game of the Week, p 45

• New Tricky Words, p 30

Small Group

• Read the Student List, p 31 Independent/Partner

• Share homework sentences, p 45-46

• Write New Words and sentences and read to two partners, p 31

• Spelling Sort, p 46

• Children reread the Unit Story, p 46 • New sentence dictation, p 46 Independent/Partner

Overview of Day 2

• Written practice test with a partner, p 47

Whole Class

• Fluency practice with a partner, p 47

• Quick Dash, (review) p 32

• Quick coding the Review Sentences, p 47

• Letterland Songs (some lessons), p 33 • Live Spelling, p 33-35 • Word Detectives, p 35-36

Overview of Day 5

Small Group

Whole Class

• Children build words, p 36-37

• Spelling test, p 47-48

• Tricky Words, p 37

• Fluency Check, p 48-49

• Read Review Sentences and Quick Code them, p 37-38

Small Group • Choose from optional activities, p 49

Independent/Partner

Independent/Partner

• Read Review Sentences, p 38

• Illustrate & picture-code words, p 50

• Quick Code the word list written on Day 1, p 38

• Read Unit Story with partners, p 50

24


Whole Class – Day 1

Step-by-Step Weekly Activities

Setting In most classrooms, the teacher will want to teach the Units in sequence to all the students in the class. Even if you have some small groups of students working in earlier or more advanced Units, all of your children will benefit from the exposure to, and participation in, the whole class lesson. The whole class lesson is designed for about 30 minutes on Day 1 and about 20 minutes on Days 2-5.

The activities for each day of the Five Day Plan are described in detail below. Activities are provided for three classroom settings: Whole Class Small Group Independent/Partner In addition to classroom activities, Homework activities are included for each day (pp 51-52). You may decide to use all these settings and activities in your classroom or you may choose those that best suit your situation. You may choose to do some activities listed here for Whole Class in a small group setting instead (or vice versa). To become familiar with all these options, read through this section before beginning the Units. Within the Units, page numbers listed for each activity refer you back to a full explanation in this section. You will also find it helpful to print out the illustrated Daily Guide Cards on the Teacher’s Guide CD. These can be printed on heavy paper and cut into 5.5 by 8.5 inch cards and placed on a ring to refer to as you teach each day.

Phonic concept review Materials Use the Picture Code Cards (PCCs) that were introduced or featured in the previous Unit. Procedures • Ask children to tell the sound and retell the Letterland story logic that explains the sound. • Specific directions are provided in each Unit. What is the purpose of this activity? This review of phonic concepts is meant to be a quick refresher on the patterns taught in the previous Unit. On Days 2 through 4 there is a more thorough review of letter sounds and patterns from the current and previous Units. Because of the extent of activities on Day 1, there is limited time for review. So this brief review is important as it often provides a link to new concepts in the current Unit.

DAY 1 Overview of Day 1 Whole Class • Phonic concept review

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart

• Introduce new concepts on the pocket chart

Materials Picture Code Cards listed at the beginning of the activity. In some Units, you will also use the illustrated book, Beyond ABC.

• Beyond ABC book (for some lessons) • Live Reading • Read the new Word Cards on your pocket chart

Procedures • Within the Unit pages you will find specific instructions for using the above materials to explain the Letterland story or ‘phonic fable’ that helps children to understand and remember the sounds that letters or letter combinations make in words. You will also be teaching about Syllable Types to help children predict the sound of the vowels in words, and to help read and spell multi-syllable words. In many of the lessons, children will do a simple, brief dramatization of the phonic fable.

Small Group • Teacher builds words for reading • New Tricky Words • Read the Student List Independent/Partner • Write New Words and sentences and read to two partners

25


I Unit A: Getting to Know the Letterlandersl

Short Vowels a, e, i, o, u Use this optional Unit to introduce children new to Letterland to the characters and learning activities, or for children familiar with the Letterlanders to review the Vowel Sounds, blending and segmenting.

Unit Focus wag

met

kit

jam

yet

zip

vet

sat

Tricky Words

fox

cub

they

nod

dug

are

rub

The words and activities in this Unit allow you to review 25 of the 26 basic letter sounds and review the Letterlanders who help children to remember the sounds. (The qu is explained in Unit 1.) The emphasis is on the five short vowels because they are often a source of confusion. For children in your classroom who are new to Letterland, or who are not confident and quick with their letter sounds, you may want to spend more time learning all the characters and their sounds. In independent work time, children could draw and color their own personal version of The Vowels poster (pictured below). A copy master is provided for this purpose with the other reproducible materials. Even for children who know their basic sounds well, strengthening their knowledge of the Letterlanders now will help them as they progress through this program learning more advanced phonic and syllabic patterns.

List A met jam

zip rub

wag dug

fox nod

cub kit

yet vet

bug fox

fog rub

let wag

fog bug

Diagnostic Words: let, job, bug, sip

List B gap yet Picture Code Cards for Review (PCCs) 1 3 6 8 14 15 18 20 24 27 33 35

ă b d ĕ h ĭ l m ŏ p t ŭ

Annie Apple Bouncy Ben Dippy Duck Eddy Elephant Harry Hat Man Impy Ink Lucy Lamp Light Munching Mike Oscar Orange Peter Puppy Talking Tess Uppy Umbrella

win sad

hop bag

jet sip

Diagnostic Words: nod, zip, cub, vet

List C fix kit

gap zip

cub met

vet job

Diagnostic Words: yet, fox, rub, sip

Tricky Words

Story Words

they

pictures important consonants

are

New Spelling Sentences Did you see the cub and the fox? They are at the vet.

62

Unit A

Review Words vowels interesting idea

at if off up

in am us egg


Day 1

DAY 1 You will need • Picture Code Cards (PCCs) for Review (previous page) • Word Cards for Unit A, List A, B, or C on the pocket chart as shown (previous page) • Student List for Unit A, copies from TG CD

Whole Class Note: After this Unit A all Units will begin with a Phonic Concept Review.

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart (p 25) PCCs: ă, ĕ, ĭ, ŏ, p, t, ŭ Words: tap, tep, tip, top, tup • Display the picture sides of the five short vowel Picture Code Cards (PCCs).

Display the first of the four Vowel Scene Posters (above) as you begin this Unit.

• These 5 Letterlanders are very important. They are very important because they are vowels, and we need a vowel in just about every word we write or read. So you will find each one of these vowels in thousands and thousands of words. Can you say the word ‘vowels?’ “Vowels.” • First let me tell you their Letterland names and their sounds because some of you may not have met them. Then you say the Letterlander and the sound. Point to each PCC and say Annie Apple, / ă /, “Annie Apple, / ă /”, Eddy Elephant, / ĕ /, etc. • The Letterlanders, like Annie Apple here, have some neat tricks that help us read and spell the thousands of words we need to know. And these tricks are sort of secret. Only people who know about Letterland can understand how to use all the Letterland tricks. But these are secrets worth sharing – which is why I am going to tell you one of them right now.

Wwww ĭ ĭ ĭ ĭ ĭ nnnnnn

• First let’s try the Slow Speak Trick. Let’s put our palms together in front of us and pretend that we have an invisible rubber band around our hands. It is a strong rubber band so we pull our hands apart slowly until we have the rubber-band stretched out about as wide as our bodies. Then we have to use our strong muscles to bring our hands back together slowly without making a sound. Guide children in stretching their imaginary rubber-band a few times. • Now, as we stretch our rubber-band with our hands we can stretch out words with our voices. Let’s try this with the word win, like you win a game. “Wwwwĭ ĭ ĭ ĭ ĭ nnnnnn.” Have children slow speak win a few times as you walk about to listen to hear if they are all actually stretching out each sound in the word. (Note: the word win is used here because all three sounds can be prolonged. While all vowels can be prolonged, stop sounds such as /d/, /b/, and /t/ cannot, so for example, in slow speaking a word such as bat only the a can be stretched (băăăăăăt). • We can slow speak any word including our own names, too. Guide children in slow speaking the names of some children in the class (e.g. Andrea: “Aaaaaannnndrrrreeeeaaaaa.”). The result may sound like a parent calling to a child to come home from playing outside. You might let children pair up and quietly stretch each other’s names.

63

Unit A


The Sounds Trick Aaaannnieee Aaaapllle

• We can also stretch the Letterlander’s names. When we want to remember Annie Apple’s sound, or any other Letterlander’s sound, all we have to do is say her name in Slow Speak and then start to say it again but just say the first sound like this, Aăăănnnieeee Aăăăplllllle, ăăă. Repeat this with the children a few times. • That’s called ‘the Sounds Trick’. It helps us remember Annie Apple’s sound. It also works with any of the other Letterlanders. You just say the name and then you START to say it again, but STOP with the first sound. Now tell your neighbor how you do the Sounds Trick. • Let’s do the Sounds Trick to help us remember what sounds these other Vowels make in words. Guide the children in doing the Sounds Trick with Eddy Elephant. Then let individual children try demonstrating the Sounds Trick with the other three Vowel Sounds. Each time after a child demonstrates the trick, have everyone repeat it to keep them all involved.

ăăă

• Now, let’s practice our Vowel Sounds. Pick up the Annie Apple card showing the plain letter side, push the card forward several times and have the children say the sound each time. You can make a little game of it by having children sustain the vowel sound as long as you have the letter pushed forward (“ăăăăăăăăă”). They becoming silent as you pull it back. Push it forward for varying intervals so children will sound something like this: “ăăăăă, ăăă, ăăăăă, ă, ăăăăăă, ă”. Follow these same steps with each of the five vowels. • Display the picture sides of the PCCs for t and p on the pocket chart. We have met all the important Vowels. Now, do you know what all the other letters in the alphabet are called? Yes, they are consonants. That can be a hard word to say, so let’s practice saying it a few times. (Model the pronunciation by syllables, if needed, i.e. con-suh-nunts.)

t

p

Try each vowel between the t and p. Children finger-sound the word and decide if it is real or nonsense.

• Briefly introduce Talking Tess and Peter Puppy and have children discover or ‘rediscover’ their sounds using the Sounds Trick. • Turn the t and p PCCs to their plain letter sides. Place the plain letter ă PCC between t and p to make tap. Show how to finger-sound the word. (See box in left margin.) Then have children decide if they’ve made a real or a nonsense word. Do the same as you place each vowel between the t and p.

Finger Sounding Touch thumb to first finger and say /f/. Touch thumb to second and then third finger as you say /ŏ/ /g/. Touch thumb to all fingers at once and say ‘fog’

Live Reading (p 27-28) PCCs: ă, b, d, ě, h, ĭ, l, m, ŏ, t, ŭ Words: bad, bed, bid, bod, bud, lat, let, lit, lot, lut, ham, hem, him, hom, hum • Have two children hold the Bouncy Ben and Dippy Ducky PCCs in front of the class. Introduce these two children as if they were the Letterlanders and have children use the Sounds Trick to discover their sounds. Then have the two children show the plain letter sides of b and d PCCs and stand with space for a child holding a vowel letter in between them. • Distribute the 5 short vowel PCCs to 5 children. Have them line up on one

64

Unit A


side of the classroom showing the picture sides of their PCCs. Have each one in turn stand between the b and d, turning to their plain letter to make a word (bad, bed, bid, bod, bud). Have the class finger-sound each word and decide if it is a real or a nonsense word. • Do the same with l and t and then h and m. Let different children hold the vowel PCCs for each set of consonants so more of them can join in. Explain the meanings of words that children might not know (e.g. hem, bid).

Read the new words (p 28-29) • Read the words in columns on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, Planes and Helicopters activity.

More Day 1 Activities Independent/Partner • Write words, p 31 Homework • Read words and sentences two times, p 51

Use Advanced PCC #5 to help children spell they correctly. Mr. Mean-e tries to trick us by saying /ā/. Spell they with e to show he can’t trick you.

Small Group Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: ă, b, d, ĕ, h, ĭ, l, m, ŏ, p, t, ŭ Words: bat, hat, hut, hot, dot, pot, pet, bet, bed, bud, mop, tip, hip, lip • Build each word and have the children finger-sound it. For some words have one child finger-sound it first and then have the group repeat the fingersounding. Call this child your Blending Leader. New Tricky Words On the board write the Tricky Words as shown (in the left margin). Discuss the letters that are not saying the sounds the children have learned and mark them as shown in the margin. Teach children the 3-by-3 method to practice these words. (Fuller details on page 30.) Read the Student List (p 31)

Day 2 Whole Class

Tricky Words

Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32)

they ar

Live Spelling (p 33-35) PCCs: ă, c, ĕ, g, ĭ, j, n, ŏ, p, t, ŭ, v, w Words: got, get, vet, wet, wag, jog, jug, cut, cup, nap, pan

DAY 2 You will need • PCCs for Review plus c,

g, j, n, v, w • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets From TG CD • Unit A Story • Word Detectives page (or write on the board) • Student List

• Have children stand in front of the class holding picture sides of the following PCCs: c, g, j, n, v, w. Introduce them as Letterlanders and have the class discover their sounds using the Sounds Trick. • Then to review the new Letterlanders and their sounds have each child in turn push the picture side forward while the class says the character’s name (e.g. “Jumping Jim”). Then the child pushes the plain letter side forward and the class responds with the sound (e.g. /j/). • Distribute the rest of the PCCs. Have all the children with PCCs sit down. • Say the first word as you ‘throw’ it (p 57). The children repeat the word as they ‘catch’ it. Then they finger-sound it (e.g. “got, /g/ /ŏ/ /t/).

65

Unit A


• Decide with the children which Letterlanders are needed. Have the three children with the g, o, and t PCCs stand facing the class with plain letter sides forming the word got.

w

a

g

• Have the class finger-sound and blend the word to check the spelling. • The children in the word remain in place as you throw the next word to the class and they catch it. Children who are seated repeat the word and then decide who needs to sit down and who needs to replace them in the word. • Follow the same steps with each word.

Word Detectives (p 35-36)

Display the first panel of the Quick Coding poster (TG CD) and refer to it as you guide children in the Word Detectives activity

• Read the two sentences with the children and let some of them highlight each short vowel sound in a different color and make ‘a smile’ (the curved line called a breve, e.g. ă, ĭ) above each one, as shown.

Small Group Children build words (p 36-37)

More Day 2 Activities Independent/Partner • Highlight short vowels and mark with a ‘smile’ on word list written on Day 1, p 38 Homework • Study-Cover-Write: words, and sentences, p 51

DAY 3 Whole Class • Guess Who? pp 38-39 • Word Sort, pp 39-41 • Read Unit A Story to children, p 41-42 Small Group • Dictate Tricky Words, Review Sentences, p 42 • Children read Unit A Story, p 43 Independent /Partner • Written Word Sort, p 43 • Write words on Golden Girl’s game page (TG CD) Homework • Write 6 Sentences, p 52

Letters: a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, l, m, n, o, p, t, u Words: dug, gap, let, mad, fin, cub, job, him, bug, nod, met • You may want to play ‘Who’s that Vowel?’ to help the children identify the Vowel Sounds in each word. To play this game you say the word and children repeat it. Then they finger-sound the word (“/d/ /ŭ/ /g/”) and place just the consonants on their board with a space between. Then they begin to fingersound again, stopping on the vowel sound (“/d/ /ŭ/”). They prolong the vowel sound and slide the sound into the Letterlander’s name (e.g. “ŭŭŭŭŭŭŭUppy Umbrella”). Then they place the vowel letter and check their spelling by finger-sounding again. Review Tricky Words and Story Words (p 37-38) Read Review Sentences (p 38)

Days 3 to 5 Use the Daily Activity Guide Cards for Day 3 to Day 5 instructions and the outlines in the boxes in the left margin. A special additional Live Spelling Activity is included below in this Unit on Day 3 in order to introduce the rest of the Letterlanders. Also, see notes below on the Day 3 ‘Guess Who?’ activity and the Day 4 ‘Quick Dash’.

Day 3 ‘Guess Who?’ Add these PCCs to the PCCs for Review for this activity: c, g, j, n, v, w (p 38-39).

66

Unit A


Day 3 Live Spelling (p 33-35)

f

x

i

PCCs: ă, b, ĕ, f, g, ĭ, k, n, ŏ, p, r, s, t, ŭ, x, y, z Words: fog, kit, rub, yes, fix, zip, yet, kin, ran, sip • Have children stand in front of the class holding picture sides of the following PCCs: f, k, r, s, x, y, z. Introduce them as the Letterlanders and have the class use the Sounds Trick to discover each sound. • Then to review the new Letterlanders and their sounds, have each child in turn push the picture side forward while the class says the character’s name (e.g. “Firefighter Fred”). Then the child pushes the plain letter side forward and the class responds with the sound (e.g. /fff/). • Distribute the rest of the PCCs. Have all the children with PCCs sit down.

The Unit A Story is a 4 page play featuring Letterland characters. Find it on the TG CD 1.

DAY 4 Whole Class • Quick Dash, p 45 • Reading Race, p 45 • Play Golden Girls game, p 45, 59 Small Group • Share sentences, p 46 • Reread Unit 1 Story, p 46 • Spelling Sort, p 46 • Dictate Sentences, p 46 Independent / Partner • Practice Test, p 47 • Fluency Practice, p 47 Homework • Practice Test, p 52

DAY 5 • Spelling and Fluency

Checks and more, p 47-49

• Say the first word as you ‘throw’ it (p 57). The children repeat the word as they ‘catch’ it. Then they finger-sound it (e.g. “fog, /f/ /ŏ/ /g/”). • With the children, decide which Letterlanders are needed. Have the children with the f, o, and g PCCs stand facing the class with plain letter sides forming the word fog. • Have the class finger-sound and blend the word to check the spelling.

Day 3: Unit Story Before reading Peter Puppy’s Vowel Paintings to the children In preparation write the three groups of five ‘words’ that the characters make in the story (e.g. hat, hut, hit, hot, het). As you come to these words in the story, have your children finger-sound each word and decide if it is a real word or nonsense word. You will notice that each Letterlander likes to say words that begin with or contain their own sound. Emphasize these sounds as you read and encourage the children to do the same. It will make for a bit of fun in this and future plays. Later this will be a fun story to use for Readers Theater or even to act out in front of a younger class.

Written Word Sort (p 43) • Day 3 Written Sort Guide children filling in the first words in each column using their Student List (to be completed during Independent/Partner Work). • Day 4 Spelling Sort (p 46) In small group time, call out the words (but do not show them). Children choose the columns and write the words. Guide correction of errors.

wag met zip jam yet

fox cub dug rub

they are Copymaster for Written Word Sort and Spelling Sort for this Unit from TG CD 1

Day 4 Quick Dash (p 45) For today’s activity use all 25 of the PCCs that you have taught to this point (all the basic letters a-z except q). Golden Girl’s Go Game This reproducible Game of the Week is one of three found on the Teacher’s Guide CD. On Day 3 children write their words on the page for you to check for accuracy and neatness. On Day 4, children play the game. Instructions on page 59.

67

Unit A


Unit 9I

Vowel Men Out Walking Unit Focus In Letterland when two Vowel Men go out walking the first one waves and says his name, but the second man won’t do the same (e.g. reach, feel). He is the silent look-out man making sure the robot Vowel Stealers don’t capture them. The trick is knowing whether to spell a word with ea or ee. This week’s pair of Unit plays will help. Just teach children to think about which play the word appears in to give them a clue as to which spelling to use.

feel

beach

freeze

east

street

scream

three

repeat

sleeve

please

List A

between

leave

beach feel

      great

because

These two vowel pairs help introduce a new syllable type, the Vowel Team Syllable, in which two or more adjacent letters represent one vowel phoneme (eg. ea, ee, ai, ay, oo, ou, ow, igh). Children can recognize most Vowel Team syllables by noticing two vowels together. The Letterland story logic for the various combinations will help them learn and remember the sounds.

44 50 52 53 73 74 70 77

z ch ea ee th th qu ve

Zig Zag Zebra Digraph ch Mr. E & Mr. A Mr. E & Mr. E Voiced th Unvoiced th Queen & Umbrella Vase prop e

Advanced PCCs (APCCs) 3

d

Silent Duck

4

e

Burnt Out e

23 ed/ed/ Suffix ed/ed/ 24 ed/d/ Suffix ed/d/ 25 ed/t/ Suffix ed/t/ 32 ge Gentle Ginger

street scream

freeze leave

three please

repeat between

Diagnostic Words: breeze, speak, teeth, least

List B cheese least

Picture Code Cards for Review (PCCs)

east sleeve

teeth sweet

squeak breathe

speak squeeze

sleeve three

peach repeat

Diagnostic Words: scream, between, leave, freeze

List C sweet feel

queen leave

peak stream

meal freeze

breeze steal

repeat between

Diagnostic Words: peach, east, squeeze, street



Tricky Words Story Words

Review Words

great

mountain

eagle

catch

itch

because  

magic possible tongue

second reappear beautiful

pocket saved judge

bucket tricked globe



New Spelling Sentences The queen said their trick was great. Mr. A did not speak because he was the look-out man.



 

 




Day 1

DAY 1 You will need • PCCs for Review plus b,

• • •

c, ē, f, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, t, w, ck Display the Vowels Out Walking Poster shown below. Beyond ABC book Unit 9 Story Six Syllable Types Poster or Vowel Teams page (TG CD) Word Cards for Unit 9, List A, B, or C on the pocket chart as shown (previous page) Student List for Unit 9



  Phonic concept review (p 25) Display the above Picture Code Cards. Ask children to explain the story logic and give the sound(s) for each set.

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart (p 25) PCCs: b, f, l, r, s, t, t, z, ch, ea, ee, ve Advanced PCCs: e(Burnt Out e) Words: beach, east, feel, street, leave, sleeve, freeze Introduce the Vowels Out Walking: Mr. E and Mr. A (If your children have used Letterland at the previous level, they may be able to help you tell the Letterland phonic fables that explain the sounds of these pairs of vowels. At this level, they will be learning more challenging words containing these patterns.) • Display the ea PCC. Read about Mr. E and Mr. A out walking in Beyond ABC. Have children listen for words with the /ē/ sound and look for items in the picture with the sound. Turn the PCC to the plain side and push forward several times as children say “/ē/ /ē/… ”. • Make the words beach and then east for children to finger-sound. Vowel Team Syllable Type • Write beach and east on the board. The words we are learning about this week all have a new type of syllable in them. Let’s dot our vowels and see what we can learn about this syllable type. Make a dot under each vowel in beach. Hmmm, there are two vowels side by side and then some consonants. How many vowels are in an Open Syllable? “One.” And where is that vowel in an Open Syllable? “At the end.” Point to the word beach. So, is beach an Open Syllable? “No?”

See Appendix page 176 for Beyond ABC contents.

b

ch

• Let’s see if it could be a Closed Syllable. How many vowels in a Closed Syllable? “One.” So, it is not a closed syllable is it? It is a new kind of syllable with two vowels right together, and the two vowels just make one sound. Mr. E and Mr. A are walking together but only Mr. E is saying his name. And what is Mr. A doing? “Looking out for robots.” Yes, so they are working together like a team, helping each other and we only hear one sound. So this is called a Vowel Team Syllable. Let’s say that three times. “Vowel Team Syllable…”

s t beach v

east 

 






• Draw a railroad car under beach. So a Vowel Team has two vowels working as a team to make one sound, in this case Mr. E’s name. So underneath these syllables we’ll put a ‘v’ for Vowel Team. And in the Vowel Team syllables we are learning this week, the first vowel says its name and his teammate is silent. Make a straight line over the e in reach and a back slash through the a. Have children finger-sound the word.

See Appendix page 176 for Beyond ABC contents

More Vowels Out Walking; Mr. E and Mr. E

f ee l f

• Have children tell you the steps to quick code the word east, beginning with dotting the vowels and ending with finger-sounding the word. • Read about Mr. E and his brother Mr. E in Beyond ABC. Explore the picture with the children to find words where they can hear Mr. E’s name. • Display the ee PCC. So, here is another pair of Vowel Men who like to go out walking. Who are they? “Mr. E and Mr. E.” Who is doing the talking? “The first Mr. E.” Who is looking out for Robots? “The second Mr. E.” Turn to the plain letter side. So what do these two letters say? Push it forward several times as children repeat: “/ē/, /ē/…”.

l

l ea

• Build the words feel and the street with plain letter sides and follow the ‘Steps for Reading Words with PCCs’ on your Guide Cards.

l

• Display the picture side of the ve PCC. Share the information on the back of the PCC about the Vase Prop e. Build the words leave and sleeve. As you follow the Steps explain that they can tell these are Vowel Team syllables because they have two vowels together and that the ‘e’ on the end is not a Magic e but is just there to keep Vickie’s Vase of Violets from tipping over at the end of a word.

f r ee z f r



• Display the Burnt Out e Advanced PCC (# 4). Share the information on the plain letter side. This Burnt Out e is at the end of several of our words this week. When we see the two vowels together in the middle of the word we will know the e on the end is not a Magic e but a Burnt Out e.

z

• Build the word freeze and follow the Steps with the children. • Display and discuss the Vowel Team panel of the Syllable Types Poster (TG CD). Read the first Decodable Play • This Unit includes a decodable play about Mr. E and Mr. A, and a second one about Mr. E and his twin brother. Associating the words of the Unit with one or the other play will help children remember which words are spelled with ea and which with ee. For this reason, it is a good idea to read the first play aloud on Day 1 and save the second play for Day 2. • I am going to read you a play called “Mr. E and Mr. A Out Walking.” Later in the week you will be reading it. In this play, there are lots of words with the Mr. E’s name in them and they are spelled with ea. If we remember how the words are used in this story, it will help us spell these words correctly. Listen as I read. I will stop two or three times in the story and we will talk about what has happened and make a list of ea words on the board. • After reading the first play and making a list of ea words, you might review



 






the story by having children tell how each word relates to the story (e.g. “Mr. A and Mr. E hiked up a mountain peak.�).

More Day 1 Activities Independent/Partner • Write words, p 31 Homework • Read words and sentences two times, p 52

Live Reading (p 27-28) PCCs: b, c, ē, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, s/z/, t, w, ea, ee, th, ve Advanced PCCs: e(Burnt Out e) Words: three, teeth, scream, please, speak, sleeve, between, repeat • Line children with PCCs up to form the words and follow the Steps on your Guide Cards. Build two syllable words with a space between the syllables (be-tween, re-peat).

Read the new words (p 28-29) • Read the List A, B, or C words in columns and Tricky Words on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, and Planes activity.

     Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: b, Ä“, l, k, p, r, s, s/z/, t, t, w, z, ch, ea, ee, qu, th, ve Advanced PCCs: e (Burnt Out e),

Tricky Words

Words: least, beathe, steal, street, sweet, squeeze, breeze, cheese, leave, repeat

great becaus

• Leave a space between syllables (re-peat). • New Tricky Words Write the Tricky Words as shown. Practice one or two words with the 3-by-3 Strategy (p 30). • Read the Student List (p 31)

DAY 2 You will need • PCCs for Review plus b, ē, k, l, n, p, r, s, t, w • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets • Unit 9 Story • Word Detectives • Student List • Review Sentences

Day 2

   Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32). Review ea words • Display the ea Word Cards for the list you are working on (A, B, or C) and any additional ea words you choose. Have children read the words and tell how each word relates to the Mr. E and Mr. A Out Walking play. Read the second Decodable Play • Read the play, Mr. E and Mr. E Visit the Queen. Pause at several points in the story. Have children retell the story and identify ee words to list on the board. Review by having the children relate each word to the story.

More Day 2 Activities Independent/Partner • Read Review Sentences with two partners, p 38 • Quick code the word list written on Day 1, p 38 Homework • Study-Cover-Write: words, and sentences, p 52



 






• Show the Advanced PCC kn. Does Kicking King have room to kick with Noisy Knick in the way? “No.â€? That’s right and Kicking King is just too angry to speak. So all we hear is Noisy Nick’s /n/ sound. Make the words know, known, and unknown (un-known) for children to work out. Discuss how the un- prefix changes the meaning of known and other words.

Live Reading (p 27-28) PCCs: b, c, d, f, l, n, p, r, s, t, ch, ai, ay, oa, ow Advanced PCCs: a/Ĺ­/, kn

Tricky Words

once strai

Words: coach, coast, train, trail, afraid, tray, spray, blow, own, known

t

DAY 2 You will need • PCCs for Review plus b, c, Ä“, f, k, l, Ĺ?, n, p, r, s, t, w • Blends and Digraphs Songs CD, # 30 • Lyrics for above, (TG CD) • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets • Unit 10 Story • Word Detectives • Review Sentences

• Each of these PCCs can be held by pairs of children: ai, ay, oa, ow, and kn. Other PCCs can be held by individual children. Follow the Steps for Live Reading on your Guide Cards. • Question children about what the Vowel Men are doing in these words and have those with the vowel PCCs ‘act their part’ (e.g. Mr. O in ow saying, ‘Oh, no, you don’t,’ to Walter Walrus, or Mr. A waving and saying his name while Mr. I looks out for robots in ai).

Read the new words (p 28-29) • Read the List A, B, or C words in columns and Tricky Words on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, and Planes activity.

     Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: b, c, d, Ä›, l, n, Ĺ?, p, r, s, t, Ĺ­, x, ai, ay, oa, ow/ow/, th Words: throw, snail, explain, stay, crayon, toast, rainbow • Discuss the meanings of words as needed. • New Tricky Words Write the Tricky Words as shown. Practice one or two words with the 3-by-3 Strategy (p 30). • Read the Student List (p 31).

Day 2

   Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32) Blends and Digraphs Songs CD “Vowel Men Out Walking,â€? #30 (Printed lyrics, TG CD). • On the recorded song the third line is, “The first man says his name: Ä .â€? As the children sing this line you could hold up the ai PCC and point to Mr. A. • The second verse is about Mr. E., but you could have the children put in Mr. O as they sing as you show the oa PCC.



 






More Day 2 Activities Independent/Partner • Read Review Sentences with two partners, p 38 • Quick Code word list written on Day 1, p 38 Homework • Study-Cover-Write: words, and sentences, p 52

DAY 3 Whole Class • Guess Who? p 38-39 • Word Sort, p 39-41 • Read Unit 10 Story to children, p 42 Small Group • Dictate Tricky Words, Review Sentences, p 42-43 • Children read Unit 10 Story, p 43 Independent /Partner • Written Word Sort, p 43-45 • Write words on Splash word card page, 44,59 Homework • Write 6 Sentences, p 52

Live Spelling (p 33-35) PCCs: b, c, ē, f, k, l, ŏ, n, p, r, s, t, w, ai, ay, oa, ow Advanced PCCs: kn Words: wait, trail, tray, spray, crayon, know, below, loaf, soak, rainbow • Give the ai PCC to two children who stand at the audience left showing the picture side ready to ‘take their walk’ to be a part of a word. Do the same with ay, oa, and ow. Distribute rest of the PCCs to children at their seats who will show their plain letter sides when joining in making a word. • When ow is needed in a word, the child holding the o side of the PCC can hold up his arm and call out “Oh, no, you don’t!” as Walter tries to splash. • Say each word for children to repeat and finger sound. For below (be-low) and rainbow (rain-bow), say the word as a whole and then as two syllables with a pause in between for children to repeat. Then the children decide which PCCs belong in the word.

Word Detectives (p 35-36) • Read the sentences to and with the children. Quick code including a backslash through silent letters and a straight line over the Vowel Men ‘to sign their names.’

   DAY 4 Whole Class • Quick Dash, p 45 • Reading Race, p 45 • Play Splash game with the 5-column board, p 60 Small Group • Share sentences, p 45-46 • Reread Unit 10 Story, p 46 • Spelling Sort, p 46 • Dictate Sentences, p 46-47 Independent / Partner • Practice Test, p 47 • Fluency Practice, p 47 • Quick code Review Sentences, p 47 Homework • Practice Test, p 53

Children build words (p 36) Letters: a, a, b, d, e, f, i, k, l, l, m, n, o, o, p, r, r, s, t, t, u, w, y Words: snow, know, follow, toast, load, unload, snail, railroad, tray, spray, maybe Tricky Words (p 36) Read Review Sentences (p 37-38)

Days 3 to 5 Day 3 to Day 5 plans are outlined in the margin and on Daily Activity Cards.

Day 3: Unit Story (p 41-42) Before reading How to Make Rain to the children In this play the Letterlanders have a problem and they try to solve it. I’ll read it to you first, but we can have lots of fun reading it as play later on. After reading Ask children to retell the story using the Story Stone activity on page 54 or use the Story Map (page 53, copymaster on TG CD).

DAY 5 • Spelling and Fluency

Checks and more, p 47-49



 






Unit 15I

Robots Race while Yo-yo Man Works for Mr. E and Mr. I Unit Focus sleepy

hurry

carrot

hungry

carry

borrow

worry

mirror

sorry      

try

whole

laugh

reply

bury

spy

In this Unit children see Yo-yo Man working for two of the Vowel Men. He says Mr. I‘s name for him in words like try and reply because Mr. I gets dizzy at the end of words. Yo-yo Man is glad to help because Mr. I gives him a yummy ice cream cone every time! Yo-yo Man also appears in words like sleepy and carry, saying Mr. E’s name for him and carrying a red e for Mr. E as well. Children also learn that a vowel followed by rr may not make the usual r-controlled sound (e.g. borrow and carry). The Letterland explanation is that the two robots are too busy racing each other to bother with capturing vowels. Children remember the sentence, “Racing robots rarely rob.� In these words the syllables are separated between the two r’s and the first syllable is called ‘closed’ because the Vowel Sound feels safe and free to say its usual sound.

List A try hurry

Picture Code Cards for Review (PCCs)  ă  Ä›  Ä­  Ĺ?  o/Ĺ­/  Ĺ­  y/ÄŤ/  y/Ä“/  ea/Ä“/  er  ir  ow/Ĺ?/  ur

Annie Apple Eddy Elephant Imply Ink Oscar Orange Baby Brother Uppy Umbrella Yo-yo Man /ÄŤ/ Yo-yo Man /Ä“

Mr. E & Mr. A Ernest Er Irving Ir Mr. O & Walter Urgent Ur

Advanced PCCs (APCCs)  

rr

Racing Robots

worry carrot

borrow reply

spy sleepy

mirror carry

sorry hungry

sky sorrow

worry furry

cry narrow

errand carry

Diagnostic Words: tricky, sorrow, marry, dry

List B berry mirror

marry narrow

reply dry

tricky scurry

Diagnostic Words: sorry, borrow, carry, cry

List C cherry hurry

fry carrot

borrow sly

sorry sneaky

Diagnostic Words: berry, sorrow, spy, sleepy



Tricky Words

Story Words

Review Words

laugh

Hazel N. Swishytail

second

heard

question

hazelnuts

color

learn

hooray swooped

squirrel

Saturday forget

thirteen party

bury

whole 

 

 

               

       

  





New Spelling Sentences I saw the puppy try to bury the bone. Did you laugh when the bunny ate the whole carrot?

 

 








Day 1

DAY 1 You will need • PCCs for Review plus b, c, d, f, g, h, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, w, ch, or, the special Unit 14 card ear/er/, and special Unit 15 cards r and r (Racing Robots) • Word Cards for Unit 15, List A, B, or C on the pocket chart as shown (previous page) • Student List for Unit 15

  Phonic concept review (p 25) • Display the two PCCs, Baby Brother and Ernest Er, and the special Unit 14 card ear/er/. Let children explain the story logic and give each sound.

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart (p 25) PCCs: ă, b, c, ē, l, ŏ, p, r, s, t, w, y/ī/, y/ē/, ee, or, ow/ō/ Advanced PCC: rr Special Unit 15 Cards:r, r(Racing Robots) Words: try, reply, sleepy, carry, carrot, sorry, borrow, worry • Build the word try with the picture side for y/ī/ and plain letters for t and r.

t r

• You may have heard about why Yo-yo Man says /ī/ at the end of short words like this one. Pause and let children share what they know. • Yes, Mr. I gets dizzy on the end of a word. Yo-yo Man is glad to do the job of saying Mr. I’s name for him because Mr. I gives him a yummy ice cream every time! Children finger-sound try.

r e p l r

• Make the word reply as shown in the left margin. Separate the syllables and have children predict the vowel in the first syllable and then finger-sound each syllable. We often say the first syllable so fast that the vowel sounds more like /ĭ/ or /ŭ/. Explain the meaning of reply.

p l

• Show the y/ē/ PCC picture side. Sometimes Yo-yo Man works for Mr. E, saying his name for him at the end of a word, because Mr. E has made most of his final e’s into Silent Magic e’s. Make sleepy as shown. Separate the syllables (sleep-y), and follow the usual Steps.

r e p l s l ee p s l c c

p e

D A

• Replace y/ē/ in sleepy temporarily with the plain letter side of the Mr. E PCC. If we try to spell words like sleepy with a silent e at the end it won’t work. Replace Mr. E with y/ē/. So Mr. E actually needs Yoyo Man to take his place at the end of 100’s of words! Turn y/ē/ to the plain letter side. What is Yo-yo Man saying in this word? “/ē/.” • In today’s words some other Letterlanders are up to new tricks. Show the rr Advanced PCC (#47). We know robots like to capture vowels in their sacks. But sometimes two robots are too busy racing each other to stop and capture vowels. Then we just hear their/rrr/ sound as they run. • Make the word carry as shown. Why don’t the robots capture Annie Apple? Yes, they are too busy racing each other. So now Annie feels safe saying /ă/ as usual. We can remember about the two r’s by saying: Racing robots rarely rob. Explain that rarely means almost never. Have children repeat the sentence in bold several times. • When the robots race, one of them always gets a bit ahead. In fact, he gets into the next railroad car or syllable. So we need our robots on separate cards. Show the two Racing Robot Unit 14 Cards. Use the two cards and separate the syllables. Point to the first syllable. • Have children finger-sound the first syllable, “/c/ /ă/ /r/, ‘căr’ (or ‘care’)”



 






c a

o t

c

o t w

and the second syllable “/r/ /Ä“/ ‘ree.â€? Then they say the whole word, “carry.â€? • Make carrot and ask, Where do we divide this word into syllables? Yes, right between the racing robots. Since the robots are racing what do you think the a will say? Yes, Annie Apple feels safe making her /ă/ sound because the robots are busy racing. • Follow the usual steps for the second syllable in carrot, and then turn the o back to the plain letter side and tell the children that this is another vowel that sounds like /Ä­/ or /Ĺ­/ because we say it so fast. Have them read the word carrot and let a few children make up oral sentences with the word. • Build borrow and then sorry following the usual steps with the addition of asking children to notice the racing robots and having a child separate the syllables before deciding about the sound of the first vowel.

h Use the example above or below for hurry, furry, and scurry depending on local pronunciation.

h

• Build the word worry as shown. Remind children that “Racing Robots rarely rob,â€? meaning that in a few words a racing robot may still capture a vowel. This robot has captured an orange but he says /er/ in this word to trick us into thinking it isn’t him. These robots can be rascals, all right! So where do we divide the word? Yes, between the robots. Children finger-sound each syllable and then read the whole word. • The last word is hurry. In some English speaking areas, the u represents Uppy Umbrella’s /Ĺ­/ sound —the robots are too busy racing to capture the vowel. In other areas, Urgent Ur’s sound /ur/ is heard. Build the word to match the language of your students. (The same pronunciation variation may apply to the ur in the other Unit words, scurry and furry.)

Live Reading (p 27-28) Tricky Words

hĹ?l

laugh bury

More Day 1 Activities Independent/Partner • Write words, p 31 Homework • Read words and sentences two times, p 51

PCCs: ă, c, g, h, Ä­, k, m, n, p, r, s, Ĺ­, y/ÄŤ/, y/Ä“/,or, ur Special Unit 15 Cards:r, r(Racing Robots) Words: sky, spy, scurry, carry, mirror, hungry • Build scurry based on local pronunciation as with hurry above.

Read the new words (p 28-29) • Read the List A, B, or C words in columns and Tricky Words on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, and Planes activity.

     Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: ă, b, c, d, Ä›, f, n, Ĺ?, r, s, Ĺ­, y/ÄŤ/, y/Ä“/, ch, ur, ow Special Unit 15 Cards: r, r (Racing Robots) Words: berry, cherry, errand, narrow, sorrow, scurry, furry, fry, dry

DAY 2 You will need • PCCs for Review plus c, ē, l, m, n, p, r, t, ch, or, and special Unit 15 cards r and r (Racing Robots) • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets • Word Detectives • Student List

New Tricky Words (p 30 or Guide Cards for details) Read the Student List (p 31).

Day 2    Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32)



 






More Day 2 Activities Independent/Partner • Reread Review Sentences with two partners, p 38 • Quick code the word list written on Day 1, p 38 Homework • Study-Cover-Write: words, and sentences, p 51-52

Live Spelling (p 33-35) PCCs: ă, c, ē, ĭ, l, m, n, p, r, t, y/ī/, y/ē/, ck, or, ow/ō/, Special Unit 15 Cards: r, r (Racing Robots) Words: marry, mirror, narrow, tricky, reply, cry • Let one child be Yo-yo Man holding both y/ī/ and y/ē/, but showing only the one needed in each word. You could have the two children holding the two racing robot r cards pretend to race to their place in the word when needed.

DAY 3 Whole Class • Guess Who? p 38-39 • Word Card Sort, p 39-41 • Read Unit 15 Story to children, p 42 Small Group • Dictate Tricky Words, Review Sentences, p 42 • Children read Unit 15 Story, p 43 Independent /Partner • Written Word Sort, p 43-44 • Write words on Quest game word page (TGCD) Homework • Write 6 Sentences, p 51-52

Word Detectives (p 35-36) • Read the sentences to and with children and then guide them in quick coding. Let them help decide where to place the railroad cars for words with rr. Show the railcars for the word tricky. Use an arrow over Racing Robots. An e or an ice cream cone in Yo-yo Man’s back sack indicates the sound of y.

   DAY 4 Whole Class • Quick Dash, p 32, 45 • Reading Race, p 45 • Play Quest game, p 61 Small Group • Share sentences, p 45-46 • Reread Unit 15 Story, p 46 • Spelling Sort, p 46 • Dictate Sentences, p 46 Independent / Partner • Practice Test, p 47 • Fluency Practice, p 47 • Quick code the Review Sentences, p 47 Homework • Practice Test, p 52

DAY 5 • Spelling and Fluency

Children build words (p 36-37) Letters: a, b, c, e, h, k, I, n, o, o, p, r, r, s, t, w, y Words: worry, borrow, narrow, carrot, cherry, sneaky, try, reply Tricky Words (p 37) Read Review Sentences (p 38)

Days 3 to 5 For Day 3 to Day 5, plans are outlined in margin and on Daily Activity Cards.

Day 3: Unit Story (p 41-42) Before reading The Squirrel and the Crow to the children Our story is imaginary with talking squirrels and owls and crows, but it does tell us some things that are true about animals. (The idea that crows sometimes watch squirrels hide nuts and then retrieve them is a fact.) Do you know what squirrels like to eat? Yes, they like all kinds of nuts and this story mentions hazelnuts, filberts, walnuts, and acorns. After reading Use any of the comprehension activities on page 53-54.

Checks and more, p 47-49



 






Unit 16I

The Boot Twin Unit Focus The Boot and Foot Twins help children remember both sounds for oo. In this Unit the focus is on the /oo/ sound in boot. Children may be familiar with these twins from the previous level of Step-by-Step. The first twin grabs his brother’s footwear and taunts him, “Oo, I have your boots!� Sometimes the second twin hides behind his brother so we only see one o, as in do, to, who, and prove, but the Boot Twin still taunts, “oo!� (They will learn the other sound reperesented by oo in the next Unit.)

spoon

balloon

who

school

smooth

do

loose

proof

prove

List A

rooster

choose

lose

spoon do

balloon proof

who rooster

school prove

smooth choose

loose lose

Diagnostic Words: noon, move, tooth, broom       children

List B noon move

bloom whom

tooth cartoon

prove loose

choose tomorrow

boot whose

Diagnostic Words: goose, smooth, who, school

List C Picture Code Cards for Review (PCCs) 26 o/Ĺ­/ Baby Brother 42 y/ÄŤ/ Yo-yo Man /ÄŤ/ 43 y/Ä“/ Yo-yo Man /Ä“/ 44 z Zig Zag Zebra 46 ar Arthur Ar 54 er Ernest Er 64 oo/oo/ Boot Twin 74 th Unvoiced th 77 ve Vase Prop e

Advanced PCCs (APCCs) 4 e/-/ Burnt Out e 6 o/oo/ Hidden Twin 20 ch/k/ Digraph ch /k/ 47 rr Racing Robots 51 wh/h/ Silent Walter

goose pool

raccoon zoom

whom broom

who cartoon

moose lose

tool move

Diagnostic Words: loose, prove, bloom, whose



Tricky Words Story Words

Review Words

children  

howl

bubbles

sorry

carry

cuckoo kazoos footsies

favorite pudding extremely

hungry farther curly

reply person thirsty



New Spelling Sentences The children like to see all the animals. Who likes the moose the best?



 






Day 1

DAY 1 You will need • PCCs for Review plus b,

• • •

 

c, d, r, g, l, m, n, ŏ, p, r, s, s/z/, t, ow/ō/, sh Word Cards for Unit 16, List A, B, or C on the pocket chart as shown (previous page) A pair of boots, shoes or cut out of a pair for the Boot Twin in Live Reading Syllable Types Poster Special Unit 15 Cards: r, r (Racing Robots) Student List for Unit 16

Phonic concept review (p 25) Display the Picture Code Cards at the right. Ask children to explain the story logic and give the sound for each card.

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart (p 2527) PCCs: b, c, d, l, n, p, s, s/z/, t, ar, oo/oo/ Advanced PCCs: e(Burnt Out e), o/oo/, ch/k/, wh/h/ Words: boot, spoon, school, cartoon, do, who, lose, loose • Display the oo/oo/ PCC. Here are the Boot and Foot Twins. (If children are familiar with these twins, let them tell what they know about them.) They are the twin grandsons of Mr. O. The first twin likes to grab his brother’s boots away. Then he teases his brother saying, “Oo, I have your boots!” Have children repeat the sentence several times in a teasing manner. You may want children to pair up, one in the role of the Boot Twin and the other as the Foot Twin. All the Boot Twins pretend to take the boots of their partner and tease their ‘brothers’ by saying, “Oo, I have your boots.” Then let them switch roles and repeat.

b oo t b s

• Show the plain side. When we see these two in our words this week we’ll say, /oo/. Push the card forward several times as the children repeat the sound “/oo/, /oo/…”

t oo l

c ar

t oo n

c

t

• Build the word boot with plain letters. When we see two vowels together like these two o’s, we know it is a Vowel Team Syllable. Point to the Vowel Team panel on the Syllable Poster. And we know that it is going to be the Boot and Foot Twins. In lots of this week’s words, the first brother’s talking, so what do we hear? “/oo/.” Turn the oo to the picture side and have children finger-sound the word. • Build the words following the Steps on the Daily Guide Cards and pages 26-27. When you come to the words with these PCCs, ch /k/, o/oo/, and wh/h/, share their stories and practice their sounds: o/oo/ - Sometimes when the Boot Twin says /oo/, his brother hides behind him so we only see one letter o. He hides just for fun in some words, but when Walter Walrus is around in words like who, whom and whose, he hides because he is afraid of Walter Walrus! Tell children these words are still considered Vowel Team Syllables even though one team member is hiding.

n

ch/k/ - Sometimes the wind in Letterland blows Harry Hat Man’s hat off. Then it can’t tickle Clever Cat’s nose so she can go back to making her usual /k/



 






sound. Meanwhile Harry is too surprised to speak.

To get lose and loose right, tell children to remember, ‘You lose one twin in lose.’ For remembering the oo in loose, link it with tooth in the phrase ‘loose tooth’.

wh/h/ - When these two are together, usually Walter splashes off Harry’s hat, but sometimes Harry gets back at Walter by splashing him with a pail of water and crying out, Who do you think you are! Then it’s Walter who is too startled to speak!

l

More Resources   

   

l

 



 

Tricky Words

children Live Reading (p 27-28) PCCs: b, l, m, p, r, s, s/z/, t, oo/oo/, ch, er, sh, ve Advanced PCCs: e(Burnt Out e), o/oo/, wh/h/ Words: choose, broom, rooster, whose, prove, move

More Day 1 Activities Independent/Partner • Write and read words, p 31 Homework • Read words and sentences two times, p 51

t o m o r r ow t

m DAY 2

You will need • PCCs for Review plus l, m, p, r, s, s/z/, t • A pair of boots, shoes or cut out of a pair for the Boot Twin in Live Spelling • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets • Word Detectives

• Distribute PCCs. Let two children be the Boot and Foot Twins, the first one holding a pair of boots or shoes, the second holding the PCC. When two o’s are needed, they stand side by side and show the oo PCC. When just one o is needed, one child shows the o/oo/ PCC and the other child hides behind. • Line children with PCCs up to form the words, and have the rest of the class finger-sound them. Build rooster with them. Then move children to make a space between the syllables (roos-ter).

Read the new words (p 28-29) • Read the List A, B, or C words in columns and Tricky Words on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, and Planes activity.

   Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: b, c, f, g, l, m, n, Ĺ?, p, r, s, s/z/, t, oo/oo/, ar, ow/Ĺ?/, ve Advanced PCCs: e(Burnt out e), o/oo/, wh/h/ Special Unit 15 Cards: r, r (Racing Robots) Words: proof, prove, tool, cartoon, bloom, goose, whose, who, tomorrow • New Tricky Words Write the Tricky Words as shown. Practice one or two words with the 3-by-3 Strategy (p 30). • Read the Student List (p 31).



 

 




Day 2

More Day 2 Activities Independent/Partner • Read Review Sentences and quick code them, p 38 • Quick coding the word list written on Day 1, p 38 Homework • Study-Cover-Write: words, and sentences, p 51-52

DAY 3 Whole Class • Guess Who? p 38-39 • Word Card Sort, p 39-41 • Read Unit 16 Story to children, p 42 Small Group • Dictate Tricky Words, Review Sentences, p 42 • Children read Unit 16 Story, p 43 Independent /Partner • Written Word Sort, p 43-44 • Write words on Splash game word page, TG CD Homework • Write 6 Sentences, p 52

   Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32)

Live Spelling (p 33-35) PCCs: l, m, p, r, s, s/z/, t, oo/oo/, er, th, ve Advanced PCCs: e (Burnt out e), o/oo/, ch/k/, wh/h/ Words: tool, school, smooth, rooster, move, lose, loose, tooth • Two children hold the oo/oo/ PCC together and the same two hold the o/oo/ PCC. The class helps decide which PCC is needed in each word. When the o/oo/ is needed, one ‘twin’ hides behind the other.

Word Detectives (p 35-36) • Read the sentences to and with the children and then guide them in quick coding. The Boot Twin sound is marked with a boot whether spelled with one o or two.

      Children build words (p 36-37)

DAY 4 Whole Class • Quick Dash, p 32, 45 • Reading Race, p 45 • Play the Splash game, p 60 Small Group • Share sentences, p 45-46 • Reread Unit 16 Story, p 46 • Spelling Sort, p 46 • Dictate Sentences, p 46 Independent / Partner • Practice Test, p 47 • Fluency Practice, p 47 • Quick code Review Sentences, p 47 Homework • Practice Test, p 52

DAY 5 • Spelling and Fluency

Checks and more, p 47-49



Letters: a, b, c, c, e, h, l, l, m, n, o, o, r, s, v, w, z Words: who, whose, lose, loose, move, zoom, bloom, balloon, raccoon Tricky Words (p 37) Read Review Sentences (p 38)

Days 3 to 5 Day 3 to Day 5 plans are outlined in the margin and on Daily Activity Cards.

Day 3: Unit Story (p 41-42) Before reading The Cuckoo School tell children this is a poem about an imaginary school where children ‘rule.’ They need to listen for all the things the children do at the Cuckoo School. (The color words in the left margin are to help you divide the poem for Readers Theater. You could assign the colors to individuals or small groups when it is time for the children to read it.) After reading the story Ask children to recount as many things about the Cuckoo School as they can. You might use the Story Stone activity on page 53. You might also, ask small groups of children to make lists of as many oo/oo/ and o/oo/ words as they can find. Then compare lists and let children add more.



 






Unit 17I

Ew, ue, and oo in foot Unit Focus

blew

true

woods

jewel

clue

football

knew

argue

understood

few

blueberry bookshelf

In this Unit children will learn about three new Vowel Teams. You will be teaching them that ew can stand for two related sounds. Eddy Elephant is ready for Walter Walrus, who usually spashes the vowels next to him with cold, salty water. Instead, Eddy squirts Walter with water from his trunk causing the soaked Walrus to say “Oo! You!� That explains the /oo/ sound in blew and grew, as well as the /yoo/ sound in few. The spelling ue stands for the same two sounds, /oo/ in blue and /yoo/ in argue and rescue. This spelling pattern is one of the Vowels Out Walking pairs. Mr. U is saying his name (or just part of it), while Mr. E silently looks for vowel stealing robots. For the oo sound in foot and good, you will be reminding children of the story of the Boot and Foot Twins from Unit 16. Here the Foot Twin, whose boot has been taken, steps in a puddle with his bare foot and says, “OO /oo/, look at my foot!�

      shoes

through

List A woods blew

Picture Code Cards for Review (PCCs) 54 er Ernest Er 55 ew Eddy & Walter 64 oo/oo/ Boot Twin 65 oo/oo/ Foot Twin 69 ow/Ĺ?/ Oscar & Walter/Ĺ?/ 73 th Voiced th 74 th Unvoiced th 75 ue Mr. U & Mr. E

Advanced PCCs (APCCs) 1 6 11 13 21 51

a/Ĺ­/ o/oo/ y/Ä“/ all ea/Ä•/ wh/h/

Parachute a/Ĺ­/ Hidden Twin Yo-yo Man /Ä“/ Giant All Eddy ea Silent Walter /h/

true clue

understood blueberry

knew jewel

football bookshelf

argue few

Diagnostic Words: chew, shook, overdue, flew

List B hoof flew

argue blew

newspaper rescue cookbook threw

overdue footprint

shook clue

dewdrop blueberry

true rescue

Diagnostic Words: true, knew, few, football

List C stood untrue

chewy flew

bookshelf knew footprint woods

Diagnostic Words: blew, argue, cookbook, understood



Tricky Words Story Words

Review Words

shoes

library

laughter

loose

lose

through

magic recipe excited

digital camera mystery bouncing

who school early

worry carrot other

  

New Spelling Sentences We could see the footprints of our shoes in the snow. The big bird flew through the woods at top speed. Optional activity: Make a ‘water wand,’ as shown left, for Eddy Elephant to wave at Walter Walrus in ew words.



 

 




DAY 1

Day 1

You will need • PCCs for Review plus b, d,

Ä•, f, g, h, j, k, l, n, Ĺ?, r, s, s/z/, t, ĹŤ, v, w, er, sh, th • Word Cards for Unit 17, List A, B, or C on the pocket chart • Student List for Unit 17

  Phonic concept review (p 25) Display the two PCCs at the right. Ask children to retell the story logic and the sound for each card.

Introduce concepts on the pocket chart (p 25)

b l ew

PCCs: b, d, d, f, g, l, n, r, s, t, Ĺ­, ar, er, ew, oo/oo/, oo /oo/, ue Advanced PCC: all

b l ar

Words: blew, few, true, argue, foot, football, stood, understood

g ue g

More Resources Beyond ABC (see Appendix, p 176)

• Display the picture sides of the three PCCs, ue, ew, oo. We have these three Vowel Teams in our words this week. • Point to the ew PCC. Eddy Elephant knows that Walter likes to splash vowels with cold, salty water, but Eddy has something that no other vowel has. He has a trunk (turn to the picture side) and before Walter gets a chance to splash, Eddy soaks him with his own spray of water. Walter is so upset, he says, “Ew, you!â€? • Let’s say what Walter says, “Ew, you!â€? That reminds us (turn to the plain letter side) that these two letters sometimes say /oo/ and sometimes say /yoo/. So when I show you these letters, you say /oo/ /yoo/. Push the PCC forward a few times as children say, “/oo/ /yoo/.â€? • Make blew with the plain letters. Which letters make a Vowel Team in blew? “E-w.â€? Yes, and what are the two sounds they could stand for? “/oo/, /yoo/.â€? Turn to the picture side. Let’s finger-sound first with /oo/, “/b/ /l/ /oo/, blew.â€? Yes, like the wolf blew down the little pig’s house. It’s not spelled the same as the color blue, is it? Make the word few. Follow the Steps from your Guide Cards. Let’s fingersound first with the /oo/ sound (“/f/ /oo/, fooâ€?). Since that didn’t make a real word, let’s try the /yoo/ sound (“/f/ /yoo/, fewâ€?). Few is a word, isn’t it? “I have a few pencils on my desk.â€?

      

    

More Day 1 Activities Independent/Partner • Write words, p 31 Homework • Read words and sentences two times, p 51

• Point to the picture side of the ue PCC and explain that these are two more Vowel Men who like to go out walking. Elicit from the children that like the other Vowel Men Out Walking, Mr. U is waving and saying his name while Mr. E silently looks out for robots. Point out that in some words this pair sounds like /yoo/ (Mr. U’s name) and sometimes like /oo/ (only part of Mr. U’s name). Let a child point out Mr. U and Mr. E on the Vowel Scenes poster. • Turn to the plain letters ue for children to say (as with ew): “/oo/ /yoo/â€? each time you push the card forward. • Build the word true and then argue (ar-gue) and follow the Steps having children trying both the /oo/ and /yoo/ sounds to end up with a real word. • Show the picture side of the Boot Twin PCC (#64, oo /oo/). Ask children to recall that the Boot Twin snatches his brother’s boots and says, “Oo, I have your boots!â€? Then show the picture side of the Foot Twin PCC (#65).



 

 




Sometimes the Foot Twin speaks instead. When he steps in a puddle of water without his boots, he says “Oo /oo/, just look at my foot.� Let’s all pretend we just stepped in a cold, muddy puddle and say. “Oo, just look at my foot!�

f oo t t

f f

t b all

f

t b tb

f

• We hear that sound /oo/ in look and foot. Turn to the plain letter side and push the card forward several times as children say “/oo/, /oo/‌â€? • Make the four words with oo/oo/ and follow the Steps. Tell the children, When we don’t know which twin is speaking we may have to try both sounds to make a real word. • Review all three featured PCCs: ew, ue, and oo/oo/.

Live Reading (p 27-28) PCCs: b, c, d, Ä›, f, g, j, k, l, r, s, s/z/, w, ew, sh, oo/oo/, ue



Words: rescue, clue, flew, jewel, woods, bookshelf • Let pairs of children share in holding each of the Vowel Team PCCs ue, ew, and oo/oo/ cards. When they are in a word have them dramatize the story logic before the class finger-sounds the word. Separate the syllables for rescue (res-cue), jewel (jew-el), and bookshelf. (book-shelf).

Read the new words (p 28-29) The children may be familiar with this Letterlander from the previous level. Giant All is so tall that all we see are his two long legs. He loves apples and grabs all the apples he can. When we see his long legs (two l’s) after an a, don’t expect to hear that talking apple saying /ă/. Instead you’ll hear Giant All roaring his name, “All !�

Tricky Words

shoes throu

• Read the List A, B, or C words in columns and Tricky Words on the pocket chart with the class using the Tractors, Trains, and Planes activity.

     Teacher builds words for reading (p 29-30) PCCs: d, f, h, k, n, Ĺ?, r, v, er, ew, oo/oo/, sh, th, ue Advanced PCC: kn Words: new, knew, threw, due, overdue, shook, hoof • New Tricky Words Write the Tricky Words as shown. Practice one or two words with the 3-by-3 Strategy (p 30). • Read the Student List (p 31).

Day 2

   Quick Dash with Picture Code Cards for Review (p 32).

DAY 2 You will need • PCCs for Review plus d, f, g, h, ĭ, l, n, p, r, s/z/, t, t, ŭ, w • Letterland Word Builders or other letter sets • Word Detectives • Student List

Live Spelling (p 33-35) PCCs: d, f, ĭ, l, n, p, r, s/z/, t, t, ŭ, w, y/ē/, ar, ch, ew, oo/oo/, ue Words: true, untrue, flew, chewy, woods, footprint • After saying each multi-syllable word for children, repeat the word with a pause between syllables: untrue (un-true), chewy (chew-y), and footprint (foot-print).



 






Unit 18l

Eddy Elephant Does the Talking Unit Focus    

   

head

feather

bread

heavy

spread

weather

breath

meadow

sweat

instead ready     

Children have learned the most common sound of ea previously, along with other Vowels Out Walking. Mr. E usually does the talking while Mr. A silently looks out for trouble-making Robots. By contrast, in the words in this Unit Eddy Elephant goes out walking with Mr. E and A, and Eddy does the talking. So we hear him instead in words like bread, head, and weather. Syllables that include ea with the /Ä•/ sound are all Vowel Team Syllables because together they make one sound.

List A head ready

bread weather

feather breath

heavy instead

spread sweat

breakfast meadow

Diagnostic Words: dead, steady, deaf, leather

breakfast

List B care

enough

steady head

dead healthy

ahead lead

instead weather

deaf ready

pleasant thread

Diagnostic Words: feather, spread, breath, heavy

Picture Code Cards for Review 43 y/Ä“/ Yo-yo Man /Ä“/ 54 er Ernest Er 55 ew Eddy & Walter 64 oo/oo/ Boot Twin 65 oo/oo/ Foot Twin 69 ow/Ĺ?/ Oscar&Walter/Ĺ?/ Voiced th 73 th 74 th Unvoiced th 75 ue Mr. U & Mr. E

List C deaf heavy

meant spread

feather ahead

a/Ĺ­/ o/oo/ all ea/Ä•/ wh/h/

Parachuted a/Ĺ­/ Hidden Twin Giant All Eddy talks /Ä•/ Silent Walter /h/

breath read

meadow pleasant

Diagnostic Words: steady, head, bread, weather

Tricky Words

Story Words

Review Words

enough

care

table

slices









argue knew choose hurry

Advanced PCCs (APCCs) 1 6 13 21 51

breakfast healthy

understood whose marry bother

New Spelling Sentences We walk home when the weather is nice enough. Take care not to hit your head.



 






Assessment

158 Assessments


Levels of Step-by-Step Assessment 1. Placement, Screening and Yearly Evaluation 2. Weekly Spelling and Fluency Checks 3. Tri-Weekly Review

Assessment Letterland Step-by-Step provides assessments for a number of purposes. The chart on the next page lists the Assessments and provides information on each. It is not expected that you will use every assessment with every child. You may have other assessments that you use that will meet some of the needs of your classroom. Some children may not need some of the types of assessment provided. You will need to decide which assessments will provide information that will help you in teaching your children. Each Assessment is described briefly below. Instructions for the assessments follow beginning on page 161. Forms for children to read from, and for you to use for scoring are found on the CD that accompanies this Teacher’s Guide.

Assessments for Placement, Screening and Yearly Evaluation Fluency Screening You may want to use this assessment with all children at the beginning of the school year along with the Spelling Screening to decide if they are ready to begin in the Units of this Teacher’s Guide, and if so which Unit. Each child is assessed individually in a process that will take about 3 to 7 minutes per child. The child reads from a series of up to five brief Word Lists for 20 seconds per list (or at your discretion 30 seconds). Each list includes words from a number of related, sequential Units. Using the Individual Placement Chart will help you decide if a child has enough background word knowledge to flourish in this Grade Two Step-by – Step program. (For those children who are not ready, you are referred to the Grade Once Step-by-Step Teacher’s Guide.) You can use this information to help you decide if your students should start with Unit 1 or whether they could possibly begin with a more advanced Unit. This assessment will also allow you to assess progress at the end of the year by retesting and comparing the child’s ‘pre- and post’ levels of word reading fluency. Spelling Screening Use this assessment along with the Fluency Screening above to decide on initial placement in the Units. You can administer this assessment to the whole class together. There are five lists of ten words each for children to spell. You will probably want to give this assessment in two or three sessions with other activities intervening. Using Assessments for Initial Placement and Grouping After assessing each child with the Fluency and Spelling Screenings, compile this data on the Individual Placement Chart. After assessing everyone, you will want to compile the data from these two assessments on the Class Summary and Placement Chart as shown on page 166.

159 Assessments


Step-by-Step Assessments For Placement, Diagnosis and Yearly Evaluation Assessment

Purpose

Individual or Group

When / How Often

Time

Instruction pages

Fluency Screening

Placement in Units along with the Spelling Screening

Individual

Beginning of Year

3-7 minutes

161-162

10-50 minutes

162-164

Evaluation of yearly progress Spelling Screening

Placement in Units along with the Fluency Screening

End of Year Group

Beginning of Year End of Year

Evaluation of Yearly Progress

Weekly Spelling and Fluency Checks Unit Fluency Check

Determining mastery and whether to advance to next Unit

Individual

Weekly

3-5 minutes

48

Unit Spelling Test

Determining mastery and whether to advance to next Unit

Group

Weekly

20-25 minutes

47-48

Tri-weekly Review Assessments Review Assessment of Fluency

Progress monitoring

Individual

Every third week

3 minutes

167

Review Assessment of Spelling

Progress monitoring

Group

Every third week

10-20 minutes

167

160


Weekly Spelling and Fluency Checks At the end of the Five Day Plan for each Step-by Step Unit, you will assess your students with the Fluency Check and Spelling Test. This is a very important part of the instructional program. These assessments allow you to see if children have mastered the phonic skills and the set of words taught in the Unit. If they score at or above mastery level, you can feel confident in continuing to the next Unit. If children have not mastered the Unit, you may want to repeat the Unit for another five days using alternative Lists B or C. Full details for administering these assessments and making decisions about pacing your children are found in the Five Day Instruction Plan on pages 47-49.

Tri-weekly Review Assessments The Fluency and Spelling Reviews are both based on the same lists, one for every three Units. These tri-weekly lists include both decodable words and Tricky Words from previous Units. The assessments are given anytime during the week after the third Unit in the set has been completed. Children should not practice on the list prior to being assessed. These are important assessments because they show if the children are retaining the skills and information from several Units. If children are not meeting the criteria both for reading and spelling, further review is called for within the three previous Units. Fluency Review Children read the list for one minute. The number of words correct per minute is compared to mastery criterion printed on the page. Spelling Review Children are tested as a group spelling 20 words including decodable words and Tricky Words. The goal is to spell 80% or more or the words correctly without additional study of the words.

Administering Assessments for Placement and Evaluation You have a choice of using the Fluency and Spelling Screenings in two different ways. • Screen for children who may not be ready for this level of Letterland Stepby-Step: Give only Section R (Readiness) of each assessment. Children who score at the Instructional Level or At Risk level on these Grade One words may need to be assessed further with the assessments from Letterland Stepby-Step Grade One Teacher’s Guide. These children may need to work in Units from Grade One in Intervention Groups as described in that volume until they progress enough to be taught the Grade Two Units. • Placement If you want to consider grouping your children and beginning each group at the optimal level in these Units, give the children all the five levels of these assessments (Sections R, A, B, C, and D). Administering the Fluency Screening 1. Point to the first row of words and then the second and tell the child, Read the words going from left to right as quick as you can without missing words. Keep going until I tell you to stop. If you do not know a word you can skip it. Say ‘skip’ so I will know you are going on to the next word. If you get stuck on a word for more than five seconds, I will tell you to go on to the next word.

161


2. Ready? Begin. Time the child for 20 seconds. (You may choose to use a 30 second time limit if you prefer. This would be appropriate especially at the beginning of the school year. In this case mark through ‘20’ seconds on the score sheet and write in ‘30.’ The criteria for Mastery, Borderline, etc. are the same with either time limit.) 3. As the child reads, follow along on the score sheet. If a word is read correctly, make no mark. If the child misreads a word or skips a word make a slash mark through it. If a child skips a whole row of words call their attention to it and have them read the row. 4. Say, Stop, at the end of 20 seconds (or 30 seconds—see # 2 above). Draw a bracket after the last word read within the time limit. 5. Count the number of words read correctly within in the time limit. Enter this number in the score box. As shown on the score sheet, continue to the next section if the child reads eight (8) or more words within the time limit. Stop the testing if the child reads seven (7) or less words. 6. If the child is unable to read any of the words or only one or two, you may stop before the time is up on any section. 7. Enter scores from this assessment on the Individual Placement Chart. Administering the Spelling Screening Here are two ways you could choose to use this assessment to help you in planning for your students • Only Section R You can give just the first 10 words (Section R) of the screening to decide if your students have enough word knowledge to be ready for Grade Two Letterland instruction. Children who achieve at or above the Borderline Score of 7 words correct and score Borderline or above on the Fluency Screening should benefit from this level of teaching. For children scoring below the Borderline on either assessment, see page 166. • All five Sections You can begin with Section R and administer all 5 list (R and A-D). If you do so you will probably want to break the testing into two or three sessions. All the Sections could be completed during one or two days with less taxing activities intervening between sessions. You may choose this option if you would like to retest at the end of the year to show the progress of each child. You may also use this full assessment if you would like to see if some, or all, of your students may be able to skip part of the early Units and begin in a more advanced Unit. Some teachers may plan to break the class into two or three groups and begin each group at the optimal level for their learning. Giving the full Spelling Assessment along with the Fluency Assessment will help you decide where each group might begin (see page 166). Use the steps below for each of the five Sections of the Spelling Screening: 1. Use the Spelling Screening Blank from the TG CD or have children use the writing paper usually used in your classroom. 2. Ask children to try writing each word even if they are unsure of the spelling. 3. Read the word, the sentence, and then say the word again as shown on the next page. Repeat any words as requested by the children. 4. If testing children individually, stop at the level where the child spells three (3) words or less correctly out of ten (10). Scoring the Spelling Screening Count each word spelled correctly in the section and enter this in the box just below the section on the child’s paper. Enter these scores on the Individual Placement Chart.

162


Words and Sentences for Spelling Screening Section R (Previous Level) 1.

pick

2.

shop

3.

net

4.

hugs I gave my mother lots of hugs. hugs

5.

thank

6.

grape This grape juice is delicious.

7.

team

He is on my team.

8.

float

Can you float on your back?

9.

played

10.

Please pick up your toys.

pick

We need to shop for some groceries. I caught the butterfly in a net.

net

Thank you for the lovely flowers.

thank

grape

team float

We played until it was too dark.

start

shop

Start the car and let’s go!

played

start

Section A (Units 1-8) 1.

neck

2.

spin

3.

glass

4.

blame

They did not blame me for the mess. blame

5.

drove

We drove the car to the shore.

6.

edge

7.

smiled

8.

catch

9.

music We listened to some soft music after lunch.

10.

A mosquito bit my neck.

neck

You can spin the wheel next.

spin

Will you have a glass of juice?

glass

drove

Stay away from the edge of the cliff. She smiled at the baby. Can you catch this ball?

edge

smiled catch music

opened Alex opened the door. opened

Section B (Units 9-21) 1.

speak

I was so surprised that I couldn’t speak.

2.

freeze

If you leave that water outside it will freeze.

3.

alarm

The alarm went off at six.

4.

earth

The earth goes around the sun.

earth

5.

hurried

He hurried to the classroom.

hurried

6.

prove

7.

another

8.

group

9.

weather

10.

author

speak freeze

alarm

We can prove which rock weighs more with this scale. I saw another shooting star.

another

The group of children left an hour ago.

group

The weather was fine on Saturday. weather Who is the author of this book?

163

author

prove


Individual Placement Chart (TG CD) Use this chart to help decide if a child is ready for this level of phonics and word structure teaching. You can also use the chart to help decide whether a child needs to begin with Unit 1 or perhaps a more advanced Unit. 1. Fill in the child’s percent correct score from each section of the Reading and Spelling Screenings given. 2. Based on these scores, check the boxes below labeled Mastery (M), Borderline (B), Instructional (I), or At Risk (AR) for each Section. 3. In the next to last column, circle the two letter combination that represents the child’s performance in Reading and Spelling in that section. 4. Check the box in the final column that corresponds to the circled two-letter code to the right.

Example of the “Individual Placement Chart” filled in after a child has completed the Fluency and Spelling Screenings

A

90



95



70



 50



 80

40





 In the example above, the first section that the child had a Combined Teaching Level below ‘Mastery’ was Section A. Therefore, the best Unit for this child to begin in would be Unit 1 (the first Unit listed for Section A).

If this child was to be grouped with other children with a Preferred Teaching Level of B, it would be best to teach all the children beginning with Section A. The first child would not miss out on critical learning and the other children could consolidate their learning and build even more fluency and would soon be moving on to Section B with the first child.

165


Appendix

168 Appendix


The Sounds Trick Aaaannnieee Aaaapllle

Child Strategies These Child Strategies are taught at all levels of Letterland. Children who have been taught with Letterland in previous years will be familiar with them. Children learn to use these ‘tricks’ independently to aid in their reading and spelling. They are focused on basic skills for the most part, but suggestions for possible use at this advanced level are provided with each strategy.

The Sounds Trick Objective To discover and remember a-z letter sounds using character names.

ăăă

The TRICK Children say the Letterlanders name and then start to say it again but only say the first sound. Examples “Munching Mike, mmm.” “Eddy Elephant, ěěě.”

Children use word-stretching along with the Sounds Trick to discover or recall a letter sound.

Use at this level Most children at this level will not need this strategy for consonant sounds, but it may be helpful at the beginning of the year with the often confused short vowel sounds of Annie Apple, Eddy Elephant, Impy Ink, Oscar Orange, Uppy Umbrella. The Sounds Trick is taught as a part of Unit A Getting to Know the Letterlanders (page 63-64). There is also a related activity called ‘Who’s that Vowel’ in Unit A (page 66). Even if you elected to skip Unit A, you may want to try this with children who are struggling with spelling short vowel words correctly.

The Character Names Trick Objectives • Make use of the repeated capital letter in each Letterlander’s name to trigger rapid identification of all 26 Letterland character names as ‘sight’ words. • Use the basic words in some Letterlander names to learn the words by sight and to read rhyming words by analogy. The TRICK Children look for the two capital letters, one beginning the first name and the other the second name, as their trick for recognizing all names, even more challenging Letterland names such as Quarrelsome Queen and Vickie Violet. Examples The two capitals: Bouncy Ben, Firefighter Fred, Uppy Umbrella. Basic words: Harry Hat Man, Golden Girl, Jumping Jim. Rhyming words: Kicking King (ticking, picking, wing, thing), Use at this level Many of the Readers Theater Plays that go with each Unit involve the Letterlanders, whose names children can quickly recognize with this trick.

169 Appendix


The Actions Trick Objective • To help children connect letters and sounds and to actively involve the senses. The TRICK For each Letterlander a-z, there is an Action that relates to their name and/or sound. Children make the sound as they do the action often in response to the plain letter side of the Picture Code Card. Examples For f, children aim an imaginary fire hose toward a fire as they pretend to fight the fire with foam saying ‘fff’ as they spray the flames. Use at this level For children new to Letterland, the Actions are a fun way to learn and practice the letter sounds. They can also be helpful for practicing vowel sounds for children who need still need to master them. Activities with the Actions • Quick dash with Actions Have children respond to the plain letters with the sound and action. Challenge the children (and make it fun) by going through the plain letters a few times a bit faster with each repetition as they say the sounds and do the actions. • One child silently makes an action the rest of the class says the sound. • One child makes a sound the rest of the class repeats the sound with the action. • One child spells a word using actions only. The other children convert the actions into sounds to build the word.

170 Appendix


The Capital Letter Trick Objective • To learn capital shapes and when to use them. The TRICK Each Letterlander has a special way of turning their letter into a capital. They are so proud at being given the important job of beginning someone’s name or a sentence that they do their Capital Letter Trick. Use at this level These will come in handy for any children unsure of a capital shape, and can also be a gentle reminder to use the capitals (e.g. Now, what does Harry Hat Man do when he starts an important word?)

172 Appendix


More Information for Teachers Helping children pronounce letter sounds Most children in your class are likely to have mastered basic a-z sounds, but some may need some help pronouncing single letter sounds in isolation. The Problem • Children may add an extra vowel sound when saying a single phoneme. Instead of saying /b/ they may say ‘bah’, or instead of prolonging /l/ they may say ‘luh’. • When they blend the sounds to read a word the extra sounds confuse them (e,g. ‘bah-luh-a-ckuh’ does not sound like black.) • This lack of clearly pronounced phonemes can also lead to spelling inaccuracies, such as suipu for sip. The Letterland Solution

175 Appendix


CD Contents for Grade Two Teacher’s Guide Units 1-20 Activities

Homework

Student Lists Review Sentences Word Detectives Written Word Sort

Letter to Parents Look-Say-Cover-Write-Check

Unit Stories

Daily Guide Cards

Unit Title A Peter Puppy's Vowel Paintings 1 Making a Mystery 2 Robot Day 3 African Elephant Quiz 4 Hide and Seek 5 The Letterland Road Race 6 Firefighter Fred's Fudge 7 A Letterland Mystery 8 Sports with an Optimist 9 Mr. E and Mr. A Out Walking; Mr. E & Mr. E Visit the Queen 10 How to Make Rain 11 Firefighters in the News 12 The Porcupine Report 13 Irving Ir the Ink Stealer, Urgent Ur the Umbrella Stealer 14 Bothersome Baby Brother 15 The Squirrel and the Crow 16 The Cuckoo School 17 Lucy Lamp Light’s Library 18 Eddy Elephant's Excellent Trunk 19 Munching Mike's Math 20 Melvin Mouse Needs a House

Procedure Cards

Posters Syllable Types Poster Quick Coding Poster b d Poster

Letterland Lyrics

Track # on Song CDs

for Units 1-20 Unit 1 2 2 3 4 4 6 9/10 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 16 16/17 18 20 20

Games Golden Girl’s Go-cart Track Letterland Quest Splash! 177 Appendix

Skill sh ............................ 2 th ............................. 3 ch ............................ 4 ng ............................. 1 Magic e ................... 29 ..................1 wr ........................... 13 ................... ge, gi, gy .................... ....................7 Vowels Out Walking 30 .................14 wr (see Unit 4) .............. ...................13 kn .............................. ....................8 ar ............................. 33 or ............................. 34 ur ............................. 39 ir .............................. 40 er ............................. 38 wh/h/ (see Unit 4) ....... 12 oo (boot) ................... 31 ea/ĕ/........................... ...................15 ow /ou/ ..................... 35 ou ............................ 36


Syllable Train Cars for Enlarging Enlarge these train cars with your copier or scanner to match the size of your Picture Code Cards. Then have children build words on them to see how the Letterlanders work together to make the Six Syllable types. Add the Prefix engine and the Suffix caboose to read and spell all kinds of new words!

178 Appendix

Grade 2 Teacher's Guide Vol 1 (U.S. EDITION)  

The new Grade Two program provides fresh support for your children's journey to full literacy.

Grade 2 Teacher's Guide Vol 1 (U.S. EDITION)  

The new Grade Two program provides fresh support for your children's journey to full literacy.

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