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18 April 2011

Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: ... as (if Huddersfield is anything to go by) students on computing courses often don't (or rarely) use the library #jiscad #lidp

RT @daveyp: ... whereas the males have a stronger eresource usage & grade correlation than the females #jiscad #lidp

APR 16, 2011 01:39P.M.

APR 16, 2011 01:38P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: Seems fairly common for computing courses not to have a library usage & grade correlation — need to check actual usage levels #jiscad #lidp

RT @daveyp: Hmm — found a slight gender difference in one of the #jiscad #lidp sets: females have a stronger book & grade correlation than males ... APR 16, 2011 01:38P.M.

APR 16, 2011 01:39P.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

... as (if Huddersfield is anything to go by) students on computing courses often don't (or rarely) use the library #jiscad #lidp

RT @daveyp: Hmm — found a slight gender difference in one of the #jiscad #lidp sets: females have a stronger book & grade correlation than males ...

APR 16, 2011 12:16P.M.

APR 16, 2011 11:16A.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Seems fairly common for computing courses not to have a library usage & grade correlation — need to check actual usage levels #jiscad #lidp

... whereas the males have a stronger e-resource usage & grade correlation than the females #jiscad #lidp APR 16, 2011 11:14A.M.

APR 16, 2011 12:15P.M. JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Hmm — found a slight gender difference in one of the #jiscad #lidp sets: females have a stronger book & grade correlation than males ...

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: ... whereas the males have a stronger eresource usage & grade correlation than the females #jiscad #lidp

APR 16, 2011 11:14A.M.

APR 16, 2011 11:16A.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Getting my head round Pearson & Spearman Correlations and playing with the #jiscad #lidp data

RT @daveyp: Of interest to #jiscad ? Sounds like library usage data and targeted suggestions/recommendations are being discussed at #nfais

APR 16, 2011 09:15A.M.

APR 15, 2011 03:53P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Looking at R http://bit.ly/8tUTI after @psychemedia talked about it in the pub last night. Will have a play around with it for #jiscad #lipd

SALT - SURFACING THE ACADEMIC LONG TAIL

janinerigby APR 15, 2011 03:14P.M. I’m currently project managing, SALT, but my own area of interest is evaluation and user behaviour – So I’m going to be taking on an active role in putting what we develop in front of the right users (we’re thinking academics here at the University) to see what their reactions might be. As I think this over, a number of questions and issues come to mind. Are we more likely to look on things favourably if they are recommended by a friend? If we think about what music we listen to, films we go and see, TV we watch and books we read, are we far more likely to do any of those things should we receive a recommendation from someone we trust, or someone we know likes the same things that we like? If you think the answer to this is yes, then is there any reason that we wouldn’t do the same thing should a colleague or peer recommend a book to us that would help us in our research? In fact more so? Going to see a film that a friend recommends that is, well average, it has far less lasting consequences then completing a dissertation that fails to acknowledge some key texts. As a researcher would you value a service which could suggest to you other books which relate to the books you’ve just searched for in your library?

APR 15, 2011 08:51P.M.

SALT - SURFACING THE ACADEMIC LONG TAIL

janinerigby APR 15, 2011 05:36P.M. The SALT project plan is now available The SALT Project Plan

We know library users very rarely take out one book. Researchers borrowing library books tend to search for them centrifugally, one book leads to another, as they dig deeper into the subject area, finding rarer items and more niche materials. So if those materials have been of use to them, could they not also be of use to other people researching in the same area? The University of Manchester’s library is stocked with rare and niche collections, but are they turning up within traditional searching, or are they hidden down at that long end of the tail? By recommending books to humanities researchers that other humanities researchers have borrowed from the library I’m really hoping we can help improve the quality of research – we know that solid research means going beyond the prescribed reading list, and discussing new or different works. Maybe a recommender function can support this (even if it potentially undermines the authority of the supervisor prescribed list – as one academic has recently suggested to us: “isn’t this the role of the

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

supervisor?”).

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: Of interest to #jiscad ? Sounds like library usage data and targeted suggestions/recommendations are being discussed at #nfais

Here’s how I’m thinking we’ll run our evaluation: Once the recommender tool is ready, we’ll ask a number of subject librarians to do the first test the tool to see if it recommends what they would expect to see linked to their original search. They will be asked to search the library catalogue for something they know well, when the catalogue returns their search does the recommender tool suggest further reading which seems like a good choice to them? As they choose more unusual books, does the recommender then start suggesting things, which are logically linked, but also more underused materials? Does it start to suggest collections which are rarely used, but never the less just as valuable? Or does it just recommend randomly unrelated items? And can some of the randomness support serendipity?

APR 15, 2011 03:00P.M.

We’ll then run the same test with humanities researcher (it’ll be interesting to see if librarians and academics have similar responses. As testing facilitators, we’ll also be gauging people’s reactions to the way in which their activity data is used. The question is, do users see this as an invasion of their privacy, or a good way to use the data? Do the benefits of the recommender tool outweigh the concerns over privacy?

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

@daveyp thanks for the heads up about #nfais, definitely looks useful for #jiscad

The testing of the hypothesis will be crucial indicator as to the legitimacy of the project. Positive results from the user testing will (hopefully) take this project on to the next level, and help us move towards some kind of shared service. But we really need to guage of this segment of more ‘advanced’ users can see the benefit, if they believe that the tool has the ability to make a positive impact on their research, then we hope to extend the project and encourage further libraries to participate. With more support from other libraries then hopefully researchers will be one step closer to receiving a library book recommender.

APR 15, 2011 03:00P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Of interest to #jiscad ? Sounds like library usage data and targeted suggestions/recommendations are being discussed at #nfais

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Interesting conference happening in US today which may be of interest to #jiscad: http://bit.ly/eG3wQL Follow #nfais for tweets

APR 15, 2011 02:27P.M.

APR 15, 2011 03:06P.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

SALT - SURFACING THE ACADEMIC LONG TAIL

interesting to see if librarians and academics have similar responses. As testing facilitators, we’ll also be gauging people’s reactions to the way in which their activity data is used. The question is, do users see this as an invasion of their privacy, or a good way to use the data? Do the benefits of the recommender tool outweigh the concerns over privacy?

janinerigby APR 15, 2011 11:50A.M. I’m currently project managing, SALT, but my own area of interest is evaluation and user behaviour – So I’m going to be taking on an active role in putting what we develop in front of the right users (we’re thinking academics here at the University) to see what their reactions might be. As I think this over, a number of questions and issues come to mind. Are we more likely to look on things favourably if they are recommended by a friend? If we think about what music we listen to, films we go and see, TV we watch and books we read, are we far more likely to do any of those things should we receive a recommendation from someone we trust, or someone we know likes the same things that we like? If you think the answer to this is yes, then is there any reason that we wouldn’t do the same thing should a colleague or peer recommend a book to us that would help us in our research? In fact more so? Going to see a film that a friend recommends that is, well average, it has far less lasting consequences then completing a dissertation that fails to acknowledge some key texts. As a researcher would you value a service which could suggest to you other books which relate to the books you’ve just searched for in your library?

The testing of the hypothesis will be crucial indicator as to the legitimacy of the project. Positive results from the user testing will (hopefully) take this project on to the next level, and help us move towards some kind of shared service. But we really need to guage of this segment of more ‘advanced’ users can see the benefit, if they believe that the tool has the ability to make a positive impact on their research, then we hope to extend the project and encourage further libraries to participate. With more support from other libraries then hopefully researchers will be one step closer to receiving a library book recommender.

EXPOSING VLE ACTIVITY DATA

The story so far...

We know library users very rarely take out one book. Researchers borrowing library books tend to search for them centrifugally, one book leads to another, as they dig deeper into the subject area, finding rarer items and more niche materials. So if those materials have been of use to them, could they not also be of use to other people researching in the same area? The University of Manchester’s library is stocked with rare and niche collections, but are they turning up within traditional searching, or are they hidden down at that long end of the tail? By recommending books to humanities researchers that other humanities researchers have borrowed from the library I’m really hoping we can help improve the quality of research – we know that solid research means going beyond the prescribed reading list, and discussing new or different works. Maybe a recommender function can support this (even if it potentially undermines the authority of the supervisor prescribed list – as one academic has recently suggested to us: “isn’t this the role of the supervisor?”).

APR 15, 2011 09:18A.M. Sorry about the quietness here over the past couple of weeks: you must be wondering what we were up to. • We’ve been extracting the data from Sakai, which was more difficult than it sounds. Sakai stores its events in a massive SQL table, one after the other, so that it’s tens of millions of rows long before very long at all. Merging tables, fixing corrupt old data, that kind of thing. Anyway, all done now. • We’re investigating tools to help us analyse the data. Pentaho looks very promising. But all this is just detail (albeit time-consuming, irritating detail) around the core issue of what data have we got and what can we do with it. To that end we’ve had a few internal workshops, sent out a few emails, bent some ears, and so on.

Here’s how I’m thinking we’ll run our evaluation: Once the recommender tool is ready, we’ll ask a number of subject librarians to do the first test the tool to see if it recommends what they would expect to see linked to their original search. They will be asked to search the library catalogue for something they know well, when the catalogue returns their search does the recommender tool suggest further reading which seems like a good choice to them? As they choose more unusual books, does the recommender then start suggesting things, which are logically linked, but also more underused materials? Does it start to suggest collections which are rarely used, but never the less just as valuable? Or does it just recommend randomly unrelated items? And can some of the randomness support serendipity?

Though none of this should be treated as doctrine, and we’re still definitely open to ideas, we thought it was time to do some initial data investigations, now that we have it. The key structuring concept for me is:

Who will be interested in our data, and what would they like to know? An easy to imagine, but not entirely encompassing imaginary situations are these.

We’ll then run the same test with humanities researcher (it’ll be

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

• If someone else were running the VLE, what would we want to know about it?

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: Exciting stuff! The 2 sets of #jiscad #lidp data we received yesterday have correlations for final grade / book loans & e-resource usage :-)

• If we could get secret, spy-style access to our deadliest rival institution (identity an exercise for the reader) what would we want to find out to make our VLE more awe-inspiring than theirs? • If a charismatic leader were to rouse academics or students to come to our door bearing pitchforks and burning torches, demanding VLE data, what would be the rhetoric — what would they be demanding? If we bear these (and similar) questions in mind when we are steering, we shouldn’t go far wrong. Let’s not get caught producing a series of odd, disconnected charts, they need to inspire thought and change. We need charts, data and stats that connect with the machinery of change.

APR 15, 2011 09:07A.M.

In terms of the data, what we have is: JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH who does what

RT @daveyp: Exciting stuff! The 2 sets of #jiscad #lidp data we received yesterday have correlations for final grade / book loans & e-resource usage :-)

So to do a meaningful analysis we have two axes: Who and What. While we’ll give away as much raw data as is possible, we need to provide supporting mappings. Who is dps1001? What is site 85? We also need to make sure, when we anonymise that we don’t lose those aspects that enable external people to ask questions. We’re working out how we should take a first stab at Who and What, and are looking at finding sources. I imagine that when we’ve done this first round of analysis we’ll discover the world doesn’t divide up how we imagine. That seems to be the near universal experience of user experience analysis, certainly we learnt in our JISC Academic Networking project that the world of networking isn’t divided up in quite the way we imagined. As we discover this from the activity data, we will iterate around, trying again and again.

APR 15, 2011 09:00A.M.

It might even be worth applying Bayesian Clustering or Entropy-Based Tree Building to see how a machine would cluster behaviour. All very exciting (to me, anyway!). See pages 15-21 of this powerpoint by Allan Neymark at SJSU to see all this simply explained in terms of Simpsons characters.

ACTIVITY DATA TO ENHANCE & INCREASE OPEN-ACCESS USAGE

Hypothesis APR 15, 2011 08:44A.M. We hypothesise that “The provision of a shared recommendation service will increase the visibility and usage of Welsh research outputs“.

Exciting times. At the same time, extremely tedious for the guys doing the database extraction and normalisation. Personally, I seem to have escaped that bit for this project. Phew!

This will be demonstrated through quantitative and qualitative assessments: 1. By a [significant] increase in attention and usage data for items held within the six core institutional repositories 2. By establishing a user focus group to explore the potential of the recommendation service and its impact on repository users

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Exciting stuff! The 2 sets of #jiscad #lidp data we received yesterday have correlations for final grade / book loans & eresource usage :-)

First full set of data through for #jiscad #lidp :-)

APR 15, 2011 08:28A.M.

Technical blog post update for Open University RISE project http://tinyurl.com/6l6a2pc #ourise #jiscad

APR 14, 2011 11:31A.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Second set of data through for #jiscad #lidp :-)

APR 14, 2011 10:46A.M.

APR 14, 2011 03:18P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @andy_land: More data on its way to MIMAS for recommender service prep - this is all suspiciously straightforward so far! #jiscad #jiscsalt

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

1st set of data merged for #lidp, with a few glitches and lessons learned. Just waiting for Shibboleth data now...#jiscad APR 14, 2011 02:53P.M.

APR 13, 2011 11:22A.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp

MT @daveyp some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp // look! awesome data! APR 12, 2011 10:52P.M.

APR 13, 2011 10:46A.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp

LIBRARY IMPACT DATA PROJECT

Beginning the data capture APR 13, 2011 09:05A.M. Further to Dave’s post about grabbing the data, we’ve also had successful sample data from Teesside and De Montfort. Check out Fulup’s blog about Stitching together library data with Excel for more details on DMU’s experience.

APR 12, 2011 10:44P.M. JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp -fun stuff!

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

@daveyp interesting, I'm working on #jiscad at the moment too - starting to pull together some information for the #inf11 evaluation

APR 13, 2011 12:34A.M.

APR 12, 2011 10:39P.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

LIBRARY IMPACT DATA PROJECT

RT @daveyp: A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp

5 years of book loans and grades at Huddersfield APR 12, 2011 10:35P.M. I’m just starting to pull our data out for the JISC Library Impact Data Project and I thought it might be interesting to look at 5 years of grades and book loans. Unfortunately, our e-resource usage data and our library visits data only goes back as far as 2005, but our book loan data goes back to the mid 1990s, so we can look at a full 3 years of loans for each graduating students.

APR 12, 2011 10:39P.M.

The following graph shows the average number of books borrowed by undergrad students who graduated with an specific honour (1, 2:1, 2:2 or 3) in that particular academic year…

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp APR 12, 2011 10:38P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

A bit too tired to be blogging, but here's some book usage & final grade graphs http://bit.ly/gxyPC6 #jiscad #lidp

…and, to try and tease out any trends, here’s a line graph version….

APR 12, 2011 10:37P.M.

Just a couple of general comments: • the usage & grade correlation (see original blog post) for books

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

seems to be fairly consistent over the last 5 years, although there is a widening between usage by the lowest & highest grades

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

More data on its way to MIMAS for recommender service prep this is all suspiciously straightforward so far! #jiscad #jiscsalt

• the usage by 2:2 and 3 students seems to be in gradual decline, whilst usage by those who gain the highest grade (1) seems to on the increase

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Data quality from the partners samples looking good #lidp #jiscad #doesthatsoundfunny?

APR 12, 2011 12:15P.M.

APR 12, 2011 03:17P.M. JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

in the latest of my #jiscad blogposts I appear to have invented a new phrase: http://bit.ly/hcRsVx #hidetheriskstick

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

@librarygirlknit and I are putting together a blog post about legal stuff and the #lidp project #jiscad

APR 12, 2011 11:53A.M.

APR 12, 2011 02:48P.M.

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

RT @daveyp: RT @Fulup: Blogged about 'Stitching together library data with Excel' http://bit.ly/gn0rhN #lidp #jiscad

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Talking to the University of Wollongong Library, Australia about the #lidp project #jiscad APR 12, 2011 02:03P.M.

APR 12, 2011 11:20A.M.

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Today’s Tabbloid PERSONAL NEWS FOR helen.harrop@sero.co.uk

18 April 2011

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

- The Leeds Met STAR-trak team have been blogging with vim and alacrity this past week. A gem of insight stood out to me in their post about users:

RT @Fulup: Blogged about 'Stitching together library data with Excel' http://bit.ly/gn0rhN #lidp #jiscad

We are in the fortunate position of already having a proof of concept application. Having something to look at makes it far easier for end users to grasp the potential uses for the application and thus come up with requirements.

APR 12, 2011 11:16A.M. - There was also a whir of synthesis team activity - namely, running the first ‘virtual event’ which I then blogged about, and also Tom Franklin released his guide to writing a robust business case. - The focus on costs vs. benefits within Tom’s guide links nicely to a point noted by Martin Turner on the AGtivity blog relating to questions about “finding and defining the usage and benefit access gives the user” which emerged from last week’s #INF11 Programme Meeting in Birmingham. Will we get further down the road on the Activity Data donkey if we focus on finding tastier carrots and do what we can to hide the ‘risk stick’ out of view (albeit not out of mind)?

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

'the Netflix effect' - US colleges using 'course recommender' software to help students choose: http://bit.ly/gyK7N9 #jiscad

JISCAD - TWITTER SEARCH

Tabbloid #5: 11 April 2011

RT @joypalmer: guys are getting the data flowing for the #jiscsalt project. smoother sailing than we thought http://bit.ly/f2rBE9 #jiscad

APR 12, 2011 04:44A.M.

APR 11, 2011 11:16A.M.

APR 12, 2011 09:28A.M.

ACTIVITY DATA

Open publication - Free publishing

This week’s Tabbloid is a bit of a bumper edition. The highlights for me are: - The RISE project have shared a demo of their MyRecommendations prototype and reported a positive reaction from their first Project Board meeting which I noticed was attended by a representative of their ‘Improving the Student Experience’ programme. Some of their discussions were (perhaps inevitably) around privacy issues which (unsurprisingly) looks set to emerge as one of the overarching themes of this programme. - LJMU reported on some of the initial hurdles they’ve faced in trying to extract the desired data from their systems and in their efforts to herd students into a focus group - suffice to say that the Royal Wedding is not really helping matters. The ‘what would we do differently’ angle they’ve added to the post is very useful and highlights the difficulty of gauging how much detail is needed in early discussions with internal stakeholders.

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JISC AD Tabbloid: 18 Apr 2011  
JISC AD Tabbloid: 18 Apr 2011  

JISC Activity Data project blogs and #jiscad tweets

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