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In his own way, Rayber is every bit as extreme as Mason. Even so, neither of the two men is caricatured by the author. Mason’s religious beliefs have been subjected to a number of severe trials; and though his zeal never wanes, he is greatly humbled as a result. Rayber is himself innately religious, in spite of his secular values; he is, at least potentially, a mystic like Francis of Assisi or Alexey Karamazov. But as a result of various pains and disappointments, he kills off each and every religious impulse that springs up within his mind or heart. His life is, ironically, an upside-down form of religious commitment. Other important characters should be mentioned. Buford Munson, the old man’s African-American neighbor, is a stern moral presence. Another important character is Tarwater’s mysterious “friend”, who shows up shortly after the death of the great uncle. This sinister figure that keeps close to Tarwater and seems to be concerned with his welfare and happiness is actually the devil. At least that was what the author intended.

What’s the Story?TM Share it! Page 7

The Violent Bear It Away” is, for me, a less successful novel than “Wise Blood”, O’Connor’s first novel. There is too much flashback, too much family history; and the conclusion, though certainly not bad, has always struck me as somewhat muddled or imprecise. The author herself had serious doubts about the worth of “The Violent Bear It Away”. Still, its strengths exceed by far its weaknesses. In fact, second only to “Wise Blood”, it is my favorite novel. It is harrowing, humorous, fierce and vivid; and the conflicts it deals with are especially relevant today. John Loranger was born in Butte, Montana in 1961 but has spent most of his life in Nevada. He served in the United States Navy from 1983 to 1987, then worked for the telephone company before retiring in 2011. He has always enjoyed reading fiction and has published two novels of his own: "The Odyssey of Art O'Hara" and "Lions and Souls: the Story of St. Mary of Egypt". His approach to fiction is best summed up by a quote from Walker Percy: "The first rule of thumb, of course, is pleasure. A good book gives the reader pleasure, the sort of deep, abiding pleasure he likes to come back to."

Copyright, 2015-2018, LeRue Press, LLC. No part of this publication may be copied or reprinted without permission from LeRue Press, LLC .

What's the story mar 2018 final  

This month’s issue has some interesting articles and a great interview with entertainer Sheilah Smiley by Brian T. Shirley of the BTS Enter...

What's the story mar 2018 final  

This month’s issue has some interesting articles and a great interview with entertainer Sheilah Smiley by Brian T. Shirley of the BTS Enter...

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