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Your organization needs to ensure it has appropriately skilled BAs possessing the capabilities needed to successfully deliver complex new business solutions that meet 21st century business needs. Your challenge is to close the gap in your BA capabilities to meet the needs of your organization. What will it take? Are you up to the task? It’s not just about competency (what you think you can do or your score on a multiple-choice knowledge assessment); it’s ALL about capability: examining your competency level against your current and future work assignments and the performance and project outcomes you achieve within your organizational context. To determine the characteristics of your BA capabilities, identify your capability gaps, and put a plan in place to close the gaps, read this new white paper that explains the groundbreaking approach to examining if your BA capabilities are enough.

Planting the Seeds to Grow a Complex Project Management Practice

This new white paper is a must read for anyone involved in improving Project Management practices

21st Century Projects

What have we learned about 21st century IT projects? Demand is outpacing our ability to deliver. Our customers need us to be much more agile. Virtually all organizations of any size are investing in large-scale, important transformation initiatives of one kind or another. As a result, projects are too big, too long, and too complex. Complexity poses barriers to change, complexity in both our legacy business processes and the information systems that support them. Too often, we take the “big bang” approach to projects instead of risk-reducing iterative models. Conventional plan-driven project management practices have higher failure rates than adaptive, incremental approaches. We are learning that requirements must evolve as we learn more about the business problem and solution. This paper presents the case for diagnosing project complexity using a new award-winning model and then making managerial decisions to use adaptive techniques to complement conventional project management approaches.


Kathleen hass associates widely read white papers on critical business practices