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YUANZHANG LEON DENG

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Table of Contents Selected Academic Works UC Berkeley <2010-2012> Arch 100 B Instructor : Rudabeh Pakravan Summer 2011 Project 2

1-6

Project 1

7 - 10

Arch 100 A Instructor: Robert Shepherd Fall 2010 Project 1

11 - 12

Project 2

13 - 16

Project 3

17 - 20

Arch 140 Instructor: Chris Belton Spring 2011 Project 1

21 - 24

Arch 160 Instructor: Dana Buntrock & Gary Black Spring 2012 Project 1 Project 2 Project 3

25 - 32 25 - 32 25 - 32

Design Competitions CTBUH COMPETITION 2012 Mentor: Rene Davids June 2012 to July 2012 Team: Leon Yuanzhang Deng & Ricardo Lei De Sousa Rethinking Tall

25 - 32

Selected Professional Works 2

Kenneth Woo + Associates

3


Instructor: Robert Shepherd Fall 2010 Project 1

11 - 12

Project 2

13 - 16

Project 3

17 - 20

Arch 140 Instructor: Chris Belton Spring 2011 Project 1

21 - 24

Arch 160 Instructor: Dana Buntrock & Gary Black Spring 2012 Project 1 Project 2 Project 3

25 - 32 25 - 32 25 - 32

Design Competitions CTBUH COMPETITION 2012 Mentor: Rene Davids June 2012 to July 2012 Team: Leon Yuanzhang Deng & Ricardo Lei De Sousa Rethinking Tall

25 - 32

Selected Professional Works Kenneth Woo + Associates Role : Project Designer 2009 - 2010

4

1402 Atwell Rd

33 - 36

Golden Hill Shopping Cener

37 - 40

5


SELECTED ACADEMIC WORKS

6

7


So

ut

hV an

Ne ss

Arch 100B Studio II Project II <Urban Activities Center>

Market Street

Site

So

ut h

Va n

Ne s

s

Market Street

Density Study 100%

500FT AND ABOVE

90%

499 FT - 450 FT

80%

449 FT - 390 FT

70%

389 FT - 330 FT

60%

329 FT - 270 FT

50%

269 FT - 210 FT

40%

209 FT - 150 FT

30%

149 FT - 90 FT

20%

89 FT - 50 FT

10%

49 FT AND BELOW OPEN SPACES

8

9


South Van Ness

#rd Floor Plan

n

sio

Mis

@nd Floor Plan

The project calls for a space for urban activity center that houses a full size swimming pool and a basket ball court as well as many other sport and gym programs. In addition to providing spaces for required programs, I added a urban open space as a mean of social intervention. My process began by investigating market street. Density is the main subject of this investigation. The dual system grid of project I is also employed in this project as a major form generation methodology where the internal programs spaces are organized based on a voronoi grid and the exterior building envelope conform withe regid grid of the city.

1st Floor Plan

Max Bldg Envelope

10

Program Massing

Centroids of Program Massing

Extract Centroids

Create Voronoi Cells From Centroids

Subtracting Cells to Create Open Spaces

11


34000 SF

34000 SF

34000 SF

34000 SF

34000 SF

Flexible Storage - 3% Equipment Storage - 1% Multi-use Court - 20%

Multi-use Court - 20%

Multi-use Court - 20%

Locker rooms - 6%

Seating - 6%

Althletics/Recreation - 68%

Seating - 6%

Flexible Storage - 3% Equipment Storage - 1%

Flexible Storage - 3% Equipment Storage - 1%

Weight & Exercise equipment area - 4%

Weight & Exercise equipment area - 4%

Indoor Excercise space - 6%

Indoor Excercise space - 6%

community Pool - 12%

community Pool - 12%

Circulation - 7%

Seating - 6% Recreational/athletics - 55%

Weight & Exercise equipment area - 4% Indoor Excercise space - 6% Pre-pool showers - 0.4% Pool equipment room - 1% community Pool - 12%

Pre-pool showers - 0.4% Pool equipment room - 1%

Parking - 9%

Yoga classrooms - 7%

Community Kitchen & Food Storage - 1.5% Outdoor activity are & Sundeck - 3% Common Garden and landscape area - 3% Storage & Support for garden & outdoor area - 0.6% Public lobby - 2% Public restroom - 3% Snack bar & soft lounge - 3% staff office - 1.5% General building storage - 2% Janitorial, garbage room - 1%

Community Kitchen & Food Storage - 1.5%

Outdoor activity area & Sundeck - 3% Common Garden and landscape area - 3%

Other - 45% (Service)

Storage & Support for garden & outdoor area - 0.6% Public lobby - 2% Public restroom - 3% Snack bar & soft lounge - 3% staff office - 1.5% General building storage - 2% Janitorial, garbage room - 1% Parking - 9%

Parking - 9%

Original configuration

Common Garden and landscape area - 3%

Circulation - 7%

Yoga classrooms - 7% Community/Hybrid - 15%

Community/Genneral - 8%

Outdoor activity are & Sundeck - 3%

Locker rooms - 6%

Circulation - 7%

Community Kitchen & Food Storage - 1.5% Storage & Support for garden & outdoor area - 0.6% Public lobby - 2% Public restroom - 3% Snack bar & soft lounge - 3% staff office - 1.5% General building storage - 2% Janitorial, garbage room - 1%

Yoga classrooms - 7%

Pre-pool showers - 0.4% Pool equipment room - 1%

Locker rooms - 6%

Collapes the Categories

Major Programmatic components

Re-categorization of programs

Re-consideration of programs

Program Study

Multi-use Court Community Pool

Exercise Room

Circulation

Community Pool Excersise Rooms

Service Stacks

Multi-use Court with seatings

Circulation Grid

Conceptual sectional diagram

Multi-use Court Community Pool

Exercise Room

Circulation

Community Pool Excersise Rooms

Service Stacks

Multi-use Court with seatings

Circulation Grid

Massing Study

12

13


14

15


1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

Arch 100B Studio II Project I <Double Negative> PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

3D View 1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT Given Image This image of bubbles is given as a source from which a formal system can be derived. In my investigation of the image, the size of the bubbles is exploited.

16

Step 1 This hypothetical system is perceived to begin with a field of bubbles laid down on a regular grid. And the size of the bubbles are exactly identical.

Step 2 Then a imaginative curve path is perceived to pass through the grid which causes the bubbles to change their size according to the distance between the centers of the bubbles to their closest corresponding points on the curve path. The smaller the distance, the larger the bubble. subsequently, the regularity of the grid is then affected by the change of the bubbles size and change its spacing to respond to the change of bubble sizes.

Step 3 The parametric relationships between the bubbles and the path as well as the grid are repeated in the vertical direction. Then another distance test is run to check the distance between two adjacent bubbles that are equal to or greater than the preset radius threshold. When the distance is greater a certain percentage of the radius of the bubble, the two adjacent bubbles will start to merge together to form a single volume.

Resulted Volume to be Subtracted Finally, this resulted volume is subtracted from a cube form by a stack of rectangular bar based on three dimensional Cartesian grid.

17


18

19


Arch 100A Studio I Project I <Double Negative>

The production of architecture has often vacillated between privileging the design of external form at the expense of interior space, or vice versa. The semester by resisting either approach, and positing another approach whereby the design of space and form will be thought of together as a complementary and subtractive process. The project calls for a three dimensional spatial construct, a Double Negative, created by at least two subtractive volumes or voids that intersect to produce a third condition. This process began by creating a montage where the two volumes were derived from. One of these negative volumes runs through the perimeter of the given box volumes while the other run through the center of it. The result is a continuous space takes the form of a three dimensional mobeus.

Montage

Derived Volume 1

Derived Volume 2

-

20

-

=

21


Arch 100A Studio I Project II <Movement-Sequence>

sequence <> circulation as public space YUANZAHNG (LEON) DENG

18th St

11 105 0

25

50

11 5

70

12

MISSOURI

ARKANSAS

55

CAROLINA

0

45 85

65

CONNECTICUT

40

20

30 40 35

90

18th St

60

10

5

19th St

19th St 75

80

95 100

175

MISSOURI

CONNECTICUT

5

ARKANSAS

16

WISCONSIN

CAROLINA

155

20th St 20th St

175

180

5

120 125

185

210

MISSOURI

CONNECTICUT

225

220

205

190

200

215

230

ARKANSAS

235

WISCONSIN

CAROLINA

22

23


+

+

+

Glazing Skin

Square Frames

Beams

+ Hand Rail

+

Steps

+ Main Bottom Cord

=

Bracing

Whole

24

25


B

A

A

B

Floor Plan

26

27


Section B-B

Section A-A

28

29


Arch 100A Studio I Project III <Potrero Hill Branch Library>

The Site of Potrero Hill has unique topography and therefore unique view to the city which resulted with a great numbers of view platforms added to the existing houses. As a result of this, the real estate value goes up very quickly in these area and then there are more and more viewing platform constructed, represented by the magenta dots. This resulted a gentrification of the area represented by the privatization of view. The project seeks to re-publicizes the view through the form of public viewing platforms as a social intervention. Also, by integrating this social program into the traditional library programs, the project also tries to seek out need definition of library for the twenty first century.

Conceptual Site Map

B

B

A

A

VITREOUS CHINA HIGHCLIFF C_TOILETS K-4368

K-4368 VITREOUS CHINA HIGHCLIFF C_TOILETS KOHLER FIRECLAY K-2314 PURIST LAVATORY

K-4368 VITREOUS CHINA HIGHCLIFF C_TOILETS KOHLER FIRECLAY K-2314 PURIST LAVATORY

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

B

B

A

A

B

B

A A

B

A A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

B

A

A

B

A

VITREOUS CHINA HIGHCLIFF C_TOILETS K-4368

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

B

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

D

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

30

B

A

2nd Floor Plan

B

A

B

A

B

Ground Floor Plan

A

B

A

K-4368 HIGHCLIFFCHINA C_TOILETS VITREOUS

3 4 K S IE L8 L C6 IH O T C ANIHCF SFTU O E RG T_I-IH V

B

A

KOHLER K-2314 LAVATORY FIRECLAY PURIST K-4368 HIGHCLIFFCHINA C_TOILETS VITREOUS

IE L8 C6 3 4 K ANIHCF S SFTU O L E IH O RG T T_I-IH C V

B

1st Basement Floor Plan

A

B

A

K-4368 HIGHCLIFF VITREOUS CHINA C_TOILETS

K-4368 HIGHCLIFFCHINA C_TOILETS VITREOUS

3 4 K S IE L8 L C6 IH O T C ANIHCF SFTU O E RG T_I-IH V

IE L8 C6 3 4 K ANIHCFS SFTU O L E IH O RG T T_I-IH C V

B

2nd Basement Floor Plan

A

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

3rd Floor Plan

A

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 TL T 1 C I3 E R V2 R U A-IK P K L F

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 TL T 1 C I3 E R V2 R U A-IK P K L F

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

RO ES LA H O YYRA 4 T 1 V2 A-IK K L TL C I3 E R R U P F

3 4 K S IE L8 L C6 IH O T C ANIHCF SFTU O E RG T_I-IH V

3 4 K S IE L8 L C6 IH O T C ANIHCF SFTU O E RG T_I-IH V

B

KOHLER K-2314 LAVATORY FIRECLAY PURIST

D

KOHLER FIRECLAY K-2314 PURIST LAVATORY

D

KOHLER K-2314 LAVATORY FIRECLAY PURIST

D

KOHLER FIRECLAY K-2314 PURIST LAVATORY

D

KOHLER K-2314 LAVATORY FIRECLAY PURIST

D

K-4368 HIGHCLIFFCHINA C_TOILETS VITREOUS

K-4368 HIGHCLIFF VITREOUS CHINA C_TOILETS

B

A

B

A

3rd Basement Floor Plan

31


6 pt

Formal Operation Diagram

Additive and subtractive methods are both employed as a formal strategy to generate library spaces. This operation assumes an initial volume as a solid book stacks and each non-book related programs such as meeting rooms are considered negative volumes which is subtracted from the initial stack and then added back to the volume at other location in order to ensure the required volume of spaces is maintained. Max Building Envelope

32

Final Massing

33


Max. Envelope Study

Height by zoning

st.

st.

Rear setback - 5'

st.

st. allowed projection

st.

st.

Viewing angles

SighTLine From

Neighbor

st.

st.

Jun 21

Jun 21

Jun

21

21

Jun 21

Jun

Jun 21

Sun Angle

st.

st.

st.

Max. envelope

r

East Elevation

Jun 21

SightLines from Neighbor

North Elevation

West Elevation

st.

Site Boundaries

st.

Site Boundaries

Site Boundaries

allowable projection

rear setback 5'

Site Boundaries

Min. Clearance

allowable projection

Site Boundaries

SightLines from Neighbor

Site Boundaries

Site Boundaries Reat Setback 5'

Allowable Projection

Site Boundaries

Allowable Projection

st.

Neighbor

Allowable Height By Zoning

sightline from neighbo

SightLines from Neighbor SighTLine From

Jun 21

le Ju Su

nA ng

Jun 21

n 21

le Ju

Jun 21

g An

n2

1

Sun

allowable Height by zoning

allowable Height by zoning

allowable Height by zoning

South Elevation

Maximum envelope of the building is determined by intersecting the extension of surrounding viewing platformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view of sight and the property lines of the site. This ensure the final volume of the building respect its existing surrounding therefore allow the new to fuses with the old. The final building volume also takes into account sun angles as passive solar strategy for the building. Such considerations responds to the programmatic needs of the library to avoid excessive direct sun light into the building while maintaining the level of daylighting necessary for the users of the library.

34

35


Section B-B

Section D-D

Section C-C

36

37


Arch 160 Materials And Construction Methods Project I <Wood>

A

B

C

D

38

A

Wood Plankings

B

1/8â&#x20AC;? Dia. Threaded rod

C

Wood Trusses

D

Existing Concrete bench

39


Typical Top Core Detail

3

2

Typical Truss 1 1

1

4

5

1

Connection Detail

6

3

5

4

2 5

3 40

Connection Detail

1

Top core made by 1/2” x 1/4” soft wood with lag joint cutted out

2

1/8” Dia. Treaded rod

3

1/8” x 1/4” bolt

4

Glue Lam made from 8 peices of 1” x 1/4” soft woods.

5

1/2” x 1/2” Diagonal member

6

Existing Conrete Bench

7

1/4” nut

8

Welding node made by scrap square Tube

9

Pre-assembled Penthogon

41


Arch 160 Materials And Construction Methods Project II <Steel>

7

1 2

9 5 The dome consists 6 pentagons which can be pre-assembled

9

4

6

6

2 9

7 9 5

6

2

3 4

Joint Detail showing the custom made gusset plate that holds the three pentagons together

Typical assemble diagram of pentagons

1 2 0.2kip

1

1” x 1“ x 5/16” Mild Steel Square Tube

32

1-1/2” dia. x 36 “ Copper Pipe

43

Modified 90 angle copper fitting

54

Modified Hose Clamp

6

5 6

Original Shape

42

Structural Analysis

Deformed Shaped

Force Diagram

Gusset Plate made by 3 pieces of 2” x 1/8” Mild Steel Flat Bar welded together

1/4” x 1/2” bolt

77

1/4” nut

88

Welding node made by scrap square Tube

99

Pre-assembled Pentagon

43


Arch 160 Materials And Construction Methods Project II <Steel>

Test Pour #1 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Sand Gravel Reinforcement Weight Volumn Density Strength

40% 1 part 3 parts 3 parts Plastic Mesh 4.9 lbs 40.5 cu. in 1.21 lb/cu. in 48.9 psi

Test Pour #4 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Pony Beads Plastic Lacing Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

10% 2 part 2 parts 1 parts Plastic Mesh 2.1 lbs 36 cu. in 0.058 lb/cu. in 13.3 psi

Test Pour #7

44

Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates

30% 1 part

Perlite Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

4 parts Plastic Mesh 1.6 lbs 30 cu. in 0.053 lb/cu. in 16 psi

Test Pour #2 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Pony Beads Reinforcement Weight Volumn Density Strength

10% 2 part 2 parts Plastic Mesh 2.1 lbs 36 cu. in 0.058 lb/cu. in 13.3 psi

Test Pour #5 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Pony Beads Small Beads Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

10% 2 part 2 parts 1 part Plastic Mesh 2.3 lbs 36 cu. in 0.064 lb/cu. in 13.3 psi

Test Pour #8 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Perlite Plastic Lacing Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

30% 2 part 4 parts 0.5 Part Plastic Mesh 2.1 lbs 36 cu. in 0.058 lb/cu. in 15 psi

Test Pour #3 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Pony Beads Rigid Foam Reinforcement Weight Volumn Density Strength

10% 2 part 2 parts 3 parts Plastic Mesh 2.7 lbs 45 cu. in 0.06 lb/cu. in 21.3 psi

Test Pour #6 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Pony Beads Foam Sand Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

10% 1 part 2 parts 2 parts 1 Part Plastic Mesh 3.1 lbs 72 cu. in 0.043 lb/cu. in 10 psi

Test Pour #9 Water/cement ratio Cement Aggregates Perlite Pumice Rocks Sand Reinforcement Weight Volume Density Strength

30% 1 part 1 parts 2 parts 2 Parts Plastic Mesh 4.9 lbs 40.5 cu. in 1.21 lb/cu. in 48.9 psi

45


Arch 160 Materials And Construction Methods Project III <Concrete>

9

12

5

10

1

11

4

6

7 7 4 6 2

5

8

4 1

4 2 3 B

3 B

Framework assembly of a typical arm of the structure

46

Typical section B-B

1

Wood “V”bracket to hold concrete formwork

8

1/4” dia. Hole

2

2x4 Wood stud to hold the bracket in position

9

3

2x4 Wood base

Flat headed #10 bolt and nut to hold the corner bead flashed with formwork

4

Wood screw

10

Concrete (see test pour #9 for mix formula)

5

1/8” plywood concrete formwork

11

6

Drywall corner bead

# 10 bolt and nut to tire the corner bead to the concrete and its reinforcement

7

1/2” square wire mesh

12

Zip tire to form a chain to act as a tensile member underneath the structure

47


Arch 140 Energy and Environment Louisiana Museum Addition

7am 8am 9am

9am

Dec 21

6am

June 21

10am

10am

8am 9am 10am 11am

11am 12pm

12pm

11am

12pm

12pm

12pm 8am

6am 12pm 6am

8am

SITE INFORMATION: Location: Detroit, MI Latitude: 42 N Orientation: 75° E of S

D

CLIMATIC CONDITIONS: • Distinct winter and summer • Average winter temperature is about 15 °F • Snowfall averages 43.3 inches per year • Summer is usually hot and humid with a high of 85 °F • Spring and fall are damp and chilly • Strong, windy storms • Mainly heating dominated

C

April 29, 2011 - Area A

11.1

10.6

12.4

8.8

A

MOUNTED WORKS 16'-0"

1.9 1

2

1.4

3

4

2.7 5

6

7

PROGRAM ACCOMMODATION: • 5 free-standing sculptures (20-100 fc) • 25 linear feet of wall for light-sensitive drawings (below 15 fc) • 45-50 additional linear feet for wall-mounted work • A traveling exhibit • Seating to accommodate 6 people

B

MOUNTED WORKS 35'-8"

SENSITIVE WORK 16'-0"

April 29, -2011 Area B Series1

8

8

7

8.2

SENSITIVE WORK 16'-0"

B

Psychrometric Chart

1

2

1.8

1.6

1.6

3

4

5

6

7

AH

Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa

30

passive solar heating passive solar heating passive solar heating

2'-4"

MOUNTED WORKS 16'-0"

A

25

20

Heating cooling

7.1

8k

15

6k 20

4k

10

C

B

4.4

A

2.7

C

10

6.9

4.6 1.6

1.5

2k

0

1

2

3

4

5

Minimum Average Temperature

6

7

8

Maximum Average Temperature

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE

Minimum Relative Humidity

Maximum Relative Humidity

RELATIVE HUMIDITY

0k

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

5

D

Comfort

DEGREE HOURS DBT(C)

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

Floor Plan

Daylighting Level Results

Section A-A

Section D-D

50

DESIGN STATEMENT In Detroit, there is never a season where the daily range in temperature and relative humidity does not dip below the comfort zone and require some form of heating. Although heating may not be necessary throughout the entire day during the summer, heating is the primary concern for our museum’s design after providing adequate daylighting. In general, our main goal is to maximize the amount of solar heat gain while moderating the amount of natural light that enters the space so as to provide adequate, controlled amounts of light for viewing art. In addition to its physical connection with the rest of the museum, we would also like to visually connect the space with the rest of the museum by providing views into the courtyard. For the interior, we hope to create a kind of spatial experience that is differentiated by gradual change of light. The orientation allows for a prominent southern facade in which we have constructed a horizontal shading device to allow for greater solar penetration during the winter months when the sun’s path is lower in the sky and less solar penetration in the summer when the sun’s path is higher. The western facade is essentially opaque while the eastern facade makes use of the vertical, structural ribs to block out the direct rising sun in the morning. The northern facade allows a moderate amount of indirect sunlight. Finally, the interior walls are laid out in order to shield light sensitive works from direct exposure. 48

49


South Facade Shading Masks

Thermal Performance in Summer

East Facade Shading Masks

North Facade Shading Masks

Thermal Performance in Winter

Wh/m 2

100000

Solar Qi

5

8 3

2

1

11

12

9

10

SEP

Energy (BTU)

4

OCT

December

5

Solar

0

5

4 2

1

12

11

10

50000

JUL

AUG

4

8 3

2

9

1

11

12

10

9 SEP

SEP

OCT

Shade Required

SOUTH

Qi -150000 Losses 150000 50000 12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm Losses Time (Hour of day)

0%

Shade Provided

MAY 5

APR

4 1

12

11

10

JAN DEC

4

1000000 -100000

Solar

12

11

10

4 2

Energy (BTU)

1

12

11

10

9

Nov

Losses Solar

Dec

Qi Losses Losses Solar

Losses -150000 50000 February Losses -100000 12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm Time (Hour of day)

SOUTH SOUTH

Solar

0 -100000

Oct

Losses

Qi

February

Time (Hour of day)

Design A Loads Chart 0

-100000 100000 -50000

DEC

Sep

Qi

7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

DEC

Losses

Losses

0 50000

-50000 150000

FEB

FEB

JAN

Jul

Aug

Solar

8 3

9

12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

South_WINTER

MAR

JAN

Losses

Losses

SOUTH

1

Qi

Qi

50000 -50000 -150000

2

APR

7

5

8 3

Solar

5 6

6

MAR

7

5

FEB

7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

APR

6

6

9

Energy (BTU)

2

51-75%

7

MAY

150000 50000 -50000

8 3

Design A Loads Chart

-150000 January 50000 12am 1am 2am 3am 9pm 10pm11pm Losses4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 100000 Time (Hour of day)

76-100%

MAY

5

May

Jun

Losses

51-75%

7

Apr

Qi

Shade Provided Shade Provided

Losses

3640

Losses 0

Solar

150000

0%

0%

Losses

Design A Loads Chart

Design A Loads Chart

-100000 100000

1-25%

1-25%

Qi

MAR

7

5

NORTH_SUMMER

76-100%

6

6

East_SUMMER

Solar

100000 0

Qi

-50000 150000

NORTH_WINTER

East_WINTER

Qi

Energy (BTU)

7

Energy (BTU)

51-75%

26-50%

January

76-100%

Solar 5460

7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

26-50%

51-75%

SOUTH

Design A Loads Chart

1-25%

Mar

51-75%

76-100%

Solar

26-50%

9100

Losses1820

Energy (BTU)

51-75%

SOUTH

South_SUMMER

76-100%

Feb

10920

0

NOV

Shade Required

7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm -100000 100000

12740

7280

Energy (BTU)

76-100%

02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 Hr Jan

14560

Losses

OCT

NOV Shade Required

16380

December

AUG

7

8 3

Losses

18200

Qi

6

6 5

7

5

Losses

Design A Loads Chart

7

JUL

6

6

Qi

-50000 150000

NOV

7

Solar Losses

JUN

JUN

Losses AUG

7

5

Losses

JUL

6

6

Energy (BTU)

50000

JUN 7

West Facade Solar Radiation Availability

Losses Losses -50000 -150000

Solar

0 -150000

Qi 12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am11am12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

Time (Hour of day)

12am 1am 2am 3am 4am 5am 6am 7am 8am 9am 10am11am12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm11pm

Losses Losses

Time (Hour of day)

C

A

D

B

D

B

C

A

352'8&('%<$1$872'(6.678'(17352'8&7

East Facade Elevation 352'8&('%<$1$872'(6.678'(17352'8&7

The section shows louver system at south facade allow direct sun to penetrate into the space in winter time as a source of passive heating. The louver system blocks out the summer sun while let in indirect light.

Section C-C

1

3d axonometric view - east

North Facade Elevation

West Facade Elevation

Section B-B The section shows the trombe wall on the west side of the building.

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51

352'8&('%<$1$872'(6.678'(17352'8&7

352'8&('%<$1$872'(6.678'(17352'8&7

South Facade Elevation


DESIGN COMPETITIONS

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2012 CTBUH International Student Tall Building Design Competition Rethinking Tall: Considering Context, Sustainability and Efficiency

The Proposal

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ELEMNETRAY SCHOOL

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SEMI-PUBLIC LANE (LI) SEMI-PRIVATE LANE (LONG) LONG GATE COMPLEX HOUSING SHOPHOUSES New SHOPHOUSES

ho

HIG

Lu

高架 南北

ha

Z Xin

新闸

Jia

Cr ee k

B ei

州路 苏 南

大田

Gao

S u L uzh ou u

苏州河

Nai

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an

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ELEMNETRAY SCHOOL

光复路 d uR

n Tia Da

Nai

Therefore, our project rethinks the design and planning of high rise; instead of being a fix system, we image our project to be a growing urban village that re-adopt the Lilong (the alley ways) and the Lilong house typology into its design and planning and transpose this horizontal planning strategy of the city into a vertical strategy for the building. In this way, we argue that the design and planning of the high rise building shall adopt city planning strategy. Also, we rethink the role of the courtyards in modern living and re-image the courtyard to be a flexible space that adapt various urban programs such as natural spaces, farmlands and parks etc. Then these public courtyards connects various programmed spaces which are mixed and distributed throughout the building based on their programmatic needs in order to promote a more mixed and vibrant vertical living experience. In doing so, we not only hope to provide a better physical living environment, but also a neighborhood which has a strong sense of community that simulate the existing Lilong living experience at the ground level. In addition, the proposed vertical village is connected to the village at ground level over which the proposal is built. In this way, we re -imagine the relationship between the new and the old, the future and the past, and adopt the idea of urban preservation in the design and planning of the high rise as well as the idea of recycling at an urban scale. By doing so, we not only can preserve existing housing stock, but are also able to add to housing stock in order to address the population issue in a much more quicker and sensible pace. Formally, we derived the strategy of stacking from the study of historic development of Lilong house 光复路 typology. This strategy allows the building to grow in respond to population increases and is flexible enough d 苏州河 R to form differential spaces for various programs. Such stacking strategy also allowsgfuus to image the structural n ua the unit below to support its of the building be derived from the traditional Dong Gong brackets which rely Gon 州路 苏 own weight as well as the weight above. Therefore, structurally, each individual houses will be designed as a 南 beam and supported by the columns that populated within the site. In order to minimize the negative impact on the existing site, several tests are run to find out the final layout the columns within the site. This simply strategy of stacking together with post and beam system ensure the building’s potential to grow. uz

nS

Na

HIG

大田

AY HW

Lu

Xin

高架

n Tia

南北

Da

In essence, the project is about the rethinking the role and possibility of the high rise building to 新闸路 adopt to existing urban fabric so that we not only can better transition from a horizontal living into the ineviu aL table vertical living, but also, more importantly, ensure the coexistence of the two. Zh

Urbanized Areas Corplands and natural lands Population Growth Projected Population Growth Added Volumes

Courtyard House Pre-Modern

Lilong House 1930s

Kitchen Convertion 1960s

Shop Convertion 1990s

Modern Housing 2000s

Proposed Formal Strategy

Proposed 2012

Future 2030

Future 2050

The Site Our building site, Si-Wen Li, is chosen because it contains physical traces of Shanghai’s housing development over the years and Shanghai’s urban strategies, both formally and informally, responding to the change of its urban population. It’s located at the urban center of Shanghai, and is a neighborhood developed in the 1800s based on the Lilong house units. We investigate the history and evolution of these Lilong houses in relation to the urban conditions of their time. These Lilong houses, as a building typology, were based upon the traditional southern Chinese courtyard houses which have one story and two courtyards. Upon adapting the courtyard houses typology, the horizontal planning strategy of the western row houses were also adopted into the Lilong development. Alley ways were created between the Lilong houses as a form of public space called Li-Long where Li being the semi-public lanes and Long being the semi-private lanes. This created a very dynamic relationship between the private courtyards and the public alley ways. As population increased, more and more stories are added to the house and the courtyards were gradually disappearing in respond to the lack of spaces within the Lilong development to accommodate merging needs of the residents. For instance, the rear yards were converted into kitchens, and front yards were converted into commercial spaces such as an eatery. We also see the later development of Lilong typology that adopted the modern high rise approach, but completely abandon the essence of the traditional courtyard houses and remove the courtyard in its design and planning completely. The result is a monoexperience of the residents segregated by monolithic floor plates which contrast with the rather vibrant experience at ground where human interaction and socialization 54 take place in the alley ways, or the Li and Long of the neighborhood.

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BATH

BATH UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

BATH

BATH

STORAGE

AGE STOR-

STORAGE

UP

UP

UP

BATH BATH BATH BATH

UP

UP

STORAGE

UP

UP

BATH

56

STORAGE

SHOP

SHOP

BATH

UP

STORAGE

UP

BATH

UP

SHOP

SHOP

BATH

57


Program Diagram Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Offices Offices Offices Offices Commercial Commerical

Residential

Natural Lands Residential

Residential

Commerical Commerical

Commerical Residential

Natural Lands

Offices Commerical Residential Offices Residential Commerical

Residential

Offices Natural Lands Commerical Residential Offices Residential Natural Lands Commerical

Natural Lands

Farm Lands

Residential Farm Lands Offices

Residential

Residential

Commerical

Natural Lands

Farm Lands

Residential

Natural Lands

Natural Lands Natural Lands

Natural Lands

Residential

Commerical

Offices

Offices

Residential

Residential

Current urban programs organization of Shanghai

Natural Lands

Offices

Residential

Commerical Commerical

Residential

Residential

Traditional building programs organization

Residential

Natural Lands

Offices

Offices

Farm Lands

Offices

Offices

Offices Residential

Transposing horizontal programmatic relationship of the city into vertical relationship of a highrise

Final building porgrams organization

Structural Diagram

Structural Stacking

Structural System of Traditional Donggong

A Beam as a House

Post and Beam System

Circulation Diagram

Traditional Lilong (Alley) of the Site

Pulling the Lilong vertically

Various plafroms are connected by this vertical Lilong

Adding elevator cores

Piles Pattern Study

Wh 2420+ 221 0 2000 1 790 1 580 1 370 1 1 60 950 740

N

N

A

B

C

N

D

N

E

530

N

320

F

N

G

N

H

Legends

58

Existing buildings

Columns to be culled

Existing building boudary

Proposed building

Resulted column pattern

Grids

A

Existing Grid of Lilong development

B

Based on the width of the existing Lilong houses a 40 feet by 40 feet grid is laid on the site and become the organizing mechanism for the potential columns layout.

C

A building obstruction test is run to ensure columns do not overlap with the existing building fabrics. Any columns overlap with the existing buildings are culled.

D

Result of obstruction test indicates all the potential columns can be constructed at site without obstructing the existing building fabrics.

E

A map of existing solar radiation is produced to indicate the existing “solar zones”. Then the previous columns pattern is tested against these “solar zones” to ensure columns do not overlap with these zones. Any columns inside these zones are culled.

F G

Solar zone obstruction result with all the columns inside the zones are culled.

H

The proposed building footprint is compared against with the solar zones test result to find out the columns pattern for the first phrase of the proposed building. The red, which are culled at this process, indicate all the potential columns can be erected at site to support future structure. Final proposed columns layout for the first phrase of the proposed building footprint.

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SELECTED PROFESSIONAL WORKS

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Kenneth Woo + Associations Oughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Residence

This project calls for a second store addition to the existing Eichler Style house

and a conversion of the existing car port into a garage. The addition consists of two bedroom for the growing up youths and a bathroom. The major focus of the project has centered in creating spaces that blend with the existing architecture of the house.

I was involved in this project as the project design at Kenneth Woo + Associates.

I was in charge of documenting the existing conditions of the house and work closely with the principal architect, Ken Woo, on the schematic design. During this design phase, I was in charge to create a digital model to explore the design in detail. Interior spatial quality was also explored and presented to the clients. I was also assist the principle architect in coordinating with both the clients and the engineers as well as in preparing submittal for both and Planning and building permits. Lastly, plumbing information was also modelled and compared with architectural information to check for conflict. A single line plumbing model was done for these reasons.

Proposed South East Perspective

Proposed Site Plan

Existing East Elevation

Existing North Elevation

Existing West Elevation

Proposed South Elevation

Proposed East Elevation

Proposed North Elevation

Proposed West Elevation

1402 Atwell Road

Existing South Elevation

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Typical Eave Detail Proposed 1st Floor Plan

Proposed Plumbing Isometric

Proposed Laditudinal Section

Pent Roof Cricket Flashing Detail

Proposed 2nd Floor Plan

Vertical Mulling Detail

Proposed Wall Section

66

Proposed Roof Plan

Proposed Longitudinal Section

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Kenneth Woo + Associates Golden Hill Shopping Center

1

3

5

7

M

Existing South Elevation

G

A

UP

Existing East Elevation Existing Floor Plan

Proposed South Elevation

Proposed Floor Plan

This was a landlord improvement project , the majority of which tasks involve renovating the facades of this CMU shell mall built in the 60s. A new tenant was moving in into one of the three portions of the building. Therefore, coordination between our office and the tenantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architects was needed to insure the coherence of the design and new corporate identity that the new tenant wants to put onto the building facades. I was involved in this project as the project designer at Kenneth Woo + Associates. I was in charge of documenting the 68

Proposed East Elevation

existing conditions and prepare for demolition documents for the out-of-date canopies. I also work closely with the principal architect on the facades design, in which process a digital model as created to visualized the various schemes for the facades and the new sign tower on the east end of the south facade. In additional to elevations studies, I also assisted in the wall sections studies of various schemes. Finally, renderings and photomontages were produced to explore the various finishes options.

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Sign Tower Specs

Sign Tower Perspective 1

Sign Tower Perspective 2

Facade design study

Facade design study 2

`ii ] VIEW 2

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Exterior Finishes Study

72

Wall Sections Studies

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME

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Leon Deng's Portfolio